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CHURCH SECURITY SEMINAR

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Title: CHURCH SECURITY SEMINAR


1
CHURCH SECURITY SEMINAR
  • Is it true that the Lord has an open door policy?
  • Does the Lord have rules that He expects to be
    observed?
  • It is my belief that the Bible makes it clear
    that certain behavior in His house is not
    acceptable.

2
What did Jesus Do?
  • 1. At the beginning of His ministry John 213
  • 2. At the close of His ministry. Mark 1115ff
  • 3. In His sermons. Matt. 2212 Marriage Feast
    Friend how did you get in here without a wedding
    garment?
  • 4. hired hand flees because he is a hired hand,
    and doesnt care for the sheep. (John 107-15)
  • .

3
Concept of Watchmen and Gatekeepers
  • Gatekeepers I Chronicles 921ff
  • Watchmen Ezekiel 33
  • A fox is not to be invited among Gods people to
    maim and destroy.
  • John 10 the hirelingflees because he cares
    nothing for the sheep.

4
RESPONSIBILITIES
  • Greeters
  • Ushers
  • You are the outpost, the watchman to warn of
    impending threats.
  • You stand at the door of the Lords house to turn
    aside the wolves, and other predators.
  • What Predators you may ask?

5
WHY DO WE NEED WATCHMEN?
  • Gunman, victim killed in Colo. church attack
  • Police Four others wounded, linked to earlier
    Colorado shooting
  • Law enforcement officials swarm New Life
    Church Sunday in Colorado Springs, Colo., after a
    gunman kills one and wounds four others.

6
FT. WORTH, TEXAS Sept. 15, 1999
  • Wedgewood Baptist Church - 7 killed along
    with the shooter
  • Larry Gene Ashbrook shot dead seven people and
    injured a further seven at a concert before
    killing himself

7
Brookfield, Wis. March 12, 2005
  • - It was just another weekend service for
    churchgoers in this Milwaukee suburb when,
    without warning, they began to be gunned down by
    one of their own.
  • Living Church of God - 7 killed shooter - Terry
    Ratzmann opened fire on the congregation, killing
    seven and wounding four before taking his own
    life.

8
SASH, TEXAS ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH
  •   A GUNMAN KILLED FOUR PEOPLE THEN KILLED HIMSELF
  • CRENSHAW SHOT BROWN, 61, AT CLOSE RANGE, AND
    THEN SHOT THE PASTOR, JAMES ARMSTRONG 42,
    CRENSHAW THEN DROVE TO AN INTERSECTION, WHERE HE
    SHOT AT A TRUCK TOWING A HORSE TRAILER AND THEN
    KILLED THE TWO WOMEN IN THE TRUCK AFTER THEY
    TRIED TO FLEE. WITNESSES SAID THEY COULD HEAR THE
    WOMEN SCREAMING,".

9
Neosho, Missouri- Aug. 12, 2007
First Congregational Church - 3 killed Eiken
Elam Saimon shot and killed the pastor and two
deacons and wounded five others.
10
Atlanta, Georgia Oct. 5, 2003
  • Turner Monumental AME Church - 2 killed
  • The shooter - Shelia Wilson walked into the
    church while preparations are being made for
    service and shot the pastor, her mother and then
    herself.

11
Hopkinsville, Kentucky May 18, 2001 -
  • - Greater Oak Missionary Baptist Church
  • Frederick Radford stood up in the middle of a
    revival service and began shooting at his
    estranged wife, Nicole Radford, killing her and a
    woman trying to help her.

12
Salt Lake City, Utah April 15, 1999
  • LDS Church Family History Library - 2 killed
    shooter - Sergei Babarin, 70, with a history of
    mental illness, entered the library, killed two
    people and wounded four others before he was
    gunned down by police.

13
Watchmen are to Detect Three Types of Potential
Problems
  • THE MENTALLY ILL- Who need immediate help and
    direction.
  • The SUBSTANCE ABUSER who is intoxicate and has no
    business in Gods house.
  • The WOLVES who come to maim and destroy

14
WHAT IS EXPECTED?
  • Primary duty is
  • Detect
  • Warn others
  • Call for necessary help (Minister or Police
    officer)
  • If necessary give up ones life to carry out
    responsibilities.

15
OUR CLASS TEACHES
  • What to look for in determining mental illness.
  • How to recognize signs of Intoxication
  • Crimes against children
  • Indicators of impending attack

16
BACKGROUND IFORMATION
  • What is mental illness?
  • Types of mental health problems
  • One Minute Assessment that helps determines
    mental illness severe enough to warrant
    intervention.

17
Mental Illness
  • Illness, disease or condition that either
    substantially impacts a persons thought,
    perception of reality, emotional process,
    judgment, or grossly impairs a persons behavior,
    as manifested by recent disturbance behavior.

18
Professional definition of Mental Illness
  • Mental Illness is diagnosed based on behaviors
    and thinking as evaluated by a Psychiatrist,
    Psychologist, Licensed Professional counselor,
    Licensed Social Worker, or other qualified
    professionals using a tool known as the
    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
    Disorders, Fourth Edition DSM-IV.

19
Basic Facts
  • There are two distinct types of mental illnesses
  • Serious to persistent mental illnesses which are
    caused by psychological, biological, genetic, or
    environmental conditions
  • Situational mental illnesses due to severe stress
    which may be only temporary

20
Basic Facts
  • Anyone can have a mental illness, regardless of
    age, gender, race or socio-economic level.
  • Mental illnesses are more common than cancer,
    diabetes, heart disease or AIDS.
  • Mental illness can occur at any age.

21
Basic Facts
  • 20 - 25 of individuals may be affected by mental
    illness.
  • 7.5 million Children are affected by mental,
    developmental or behavioral disorders.

22
Basic Facts
  • Nearly two-thirds of all people with a
    diagnosable mental disorder do not seek
    treatment.

23
Basic Facts
  • With proper treatment, many people affected with
    mental illness can return to normal, productive
    lives.

Basic Facts About Mental Illness NAMI Texas
24
Categories of Mental Illness
  • Personality Disorders
  • Mood Disorders
  • Psychosis
  • Developmental Disorders

25
Schizophrenia

26
Schizophrenia
  • Group of psychotic disorders characterized by
    changes in perception.
  • Affects a persons ability to think clearly,
    manage his or her emotions, make decisions,
    relate to others, and distinguish fact from
    fiction.

27
Distorted thinking
  • Results in
  • Hallucinations and delusions
  • Poor processing of information/Attention deficit
  • Illogical thinking that can result in
    disorganized and rambling speech and delusions.

28
Results continued
  • May overreact to situation.
  • Have flat effect (Decreased emotional
    expressiveness, diminished facial expression and
    apathetic appearance).

29
Hallucinations and delusions
  • Hallucination Distortion in the
    senses.experiencing auditory or visual feedback
    that is not there.
  • Delusion False beliefs not based on factual
    information.

30
Changes in Emotions
  • Lacking pleasure or interest in activities that
    were once enjoyable.
  • Withdrawn Media tends to portray as violent
    which is very rare.

31
Causes of Schizophrenia
  • Like many other medical illnesses, schizophrenia
    appears to be caused by genetic vulnerability and
    environmental factors that occur during a
    persons prenatal development.

32
Schizophrenia Facts
  • It affects approximately 2.2 million individuals
    in the U.S. age 18 and older in a given year.
  • Ranks among the top 10 causes of disability in
    developed countries worldwide.
  • Higher risk of suicide. Approximately 10 to 15
    of people with schizophrenia commit suicide.

33
Symptoms of Schizophrenia
  • Hallucinations and delusions
  • Poor processing of information/Attention deficit
  • Illogical thinking that can result in
    disorganized and rambling speech and delusions.
  • May overreact to situation.
  • Have flat effect (Decreased emotional
    expressiveness, diminished facial expression and
    apathetic appearance).
  • Hallucination Distortion in the
    senses.experiencing auditory or visual feedback
    that is not there.
  • Delusion False beliefs not based on information.

34
Mood Disorders
35
Mood Disorders
  • Mental Illness demonstrated by disturbances in
    emotional reactions and feelings.
  • Recognizable behaviors could include
  • Lack of interest and pleasure in activities
  • Extreme and rapid mood swings

36
Recognizable Behaviors continued
  • Impaired judgment
  • Explosive temper
  • Increased spending
  • Delusions

37
Causes of Mood Disorders
  • Researchers believe that a complex imbalance in
    the brains chemical activity plays a prominent
    role in selectivity. (Substance Abuse and Mental
    Health Assoc.)
  • Environmental factors can trigger or buffer
    against the onset.

38
Two most common Mood Disorders
  • Depression
  • Bipolar Disorder

39
Depression
  • Depression is a natural reaction to trauma, loss,
    death or change.

40
Major Depression
  • Unlike normal emotional experiences of sadness,
    loss, or passing mood states, major depression is
    persistent and can significantly interfere with
    an individuals thoughts, behavior, mood,
    activity, and physical health.

41
Major Depression
  • A major depressive syndrome is defined as a
    depressed mood or loss of interest at least two
    weeks in duration

42
Symptoms of Major Depression
  • Lack of interest and pleasure in activities
    Extreme and rapid mood swings
  • Impaired judgment Increased spending
  • Delusions Explosive temper

43
Symptoms continued
  • Physical slowing or agitation
  • Loss of interest in usual activities
  • Feelings of hopelessness or excessive guilt
  • Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide

44
Symptoms continued
  • Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond
    to treatment, such as headaches, digestive
    disorders, and chronic pain.

45
Causes
  • There is no one single cause of major depression.
    Psychological, biological, genetic, and
    environmental factors may all contribute to its
    development.

46
Major Depression Facts
  • Affects approximately 9.9 million American
    adults, or about 5.0 percent of the U.S.
    population age 18 and older in a given year.

47
Major Depression Facts
  • Nearly twice as many women as men suffer from
    major depression
  • While major depressive disorder can develop at
    any age, the average age at onset is the
    mid-twenties.

48
Bipolar Disorder
  • Mental Illness involving mania (an intense
    enthusiasm) and depression (as discussed
    previously).
  • Bipolar disorder causes extreme shifts in mood,
    energy, and functioning.
  • Chronic disease affecting more than two million
    individuals in the U.S.

49
Symptoms of Mania
  • Elated, happy mood or irritable, angry,
    unpleasant mood
  • Increased activity or energy
  • Inflated self-esteem
  • Decreased need for sleep

50
Symptomscontinued
  • Streaming ideas or feeling of thoughts racing
  • More talkative than usual
  • Excessive risk-taking
  • Ambitious often grandiose plans
  • Increased sexual interest and activity

51
Causes
  • While the exact cause of bipolar disorder is not
    known, researchers believe it is the result of a
    chemical imbalance of the brain. Scientists have
    found evidence of a genetic predisposition to the
    illness.

52
Causes continued
  • Sometimes serious life events such as a serious
    loss, chronic illness, or financial problem, may
    trigger an episode in individuals with a
    predisposition to the disorder.

53
Bipolar Disorder Facts
  • Affects approximately 2.3 million American
    adults, or about 1.2 percent of the U.S.
    population age 18 and older in a given year.

54
Bipolar Disorder Facts
  • The average age at onset for a first manic
    episode is the early twenties.
  • Men and women are equally likely to develop
    bipolar disorder.

55
Psychosis
  • Psychosis may be experienced by someone who has
    schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or even severe
    depression. It may also be drug induced.

56
Definition
  • A group of serious and often debilitating mental
    disorders that may be of organic or psychological
    origin and are characterized by some or all of
    the following symptoms
  • Impaired thinking and reasoning ability
  • Perceptual distortions
  • Inappropriate emotional responses

57
Definition continued
  • Inappropriate affect
  • Regressive behavior
  • Reduced impulse control and
  • Impaired reasoning of reality.

Social Work Dictionary, 2nd Edition, by Robert
L. Baker
58
Continued
  • A distortion of reality that may be accompanied
    by delusions and hallucinations.

59
Psychotic Episode
  • Simply defined, a person experiencing psychosis
    has a distortion of reality caused by delusions
    and/or hallucinations. The person may be hearing
    voices, he may look at a person and see a demon,
    he may think people are after him, he may think
    he is Jesus Christ. To the person, these
    hallucinations and delusions are REAL.

60
Psychotic Episode
  • Hearing voices. Almost always, these are very
    negative, command voices telling the person
    things like Die, die, die. or Kill yourself.
    or You are in my space, MOVE. or Youre no
    good. or Hes going to get you.

61
Psychotic Episode
  • It is not uncommon for a person hearing voices to
    hear two or three voices at one time. To the
    person, these voices are very real. Imagine
    having two or three people talking in your ear
    while an officer is talking to you.

62
Psychotic Episode
  • What are these voices like? Many people think it
    is like when a parent dies and you hear their
    voice in your head. MRI (Magnetic Resonance
    Imaging) has show that the part of brain firing
    in a psychotic episode is the same part of your
    brain you are using to hear me.

63
Psychotic Episode
  • The voices these individuals hear while psychotic
    are as real to them as my voice is to you!

64
Psychotic Episode
  • Their senses are heightened. Sounds are louder,
    lights are brighter. If you approach a person in
    psychosis who is hearing voices and start yelling
    at him you are only adding to his confusion.

65
Psychotic Episode
  • People having delusions/ hallucinations may be
    looking at you, and see a demon! You shouldnt
    assume the person recognizes who you are..

66
Psychotic Episode
  • Feelings of Paranoia Image you are hearing three
    angry violent voices, lights and sounds are over
    stimulating you, and you havent sleep for three
    days.

67
Psychotic Episode
  • Behavioral Cues Inappropriate dress, impulsive
    body movements, causing injury to self.
  • Emotional Cues Lack of emotional response,
    inappropriate emotional reactions.

68
Psychosis Exercise
  • Have one student sit in front of the room. Have
    two students, one on either side, talking in the
    ear of the student who is sitting down. Have one
    more student act as an officer talking to the
    student who is sitting down. The person sitting
    down, who is psychotic, will experience how
    difficult it is to concentrate on the officer.

69
Developmental Disorders
70
Definition
  • A developmental disability is a severe, chronic
    disability of a person five years of age or
    older.
  • Such a disability
  • - Is attributable to a mental or physical
    impairment or combination of the two.

71
Definition Continued
  • Is manifested prior to the age of 22.
  • Is likely to continue indefinitely.
  • Displayed through substantial limitation of three
    or more life activities.

72
Needs
  • For lifelong or extended care, treatment or other
    services which are planned according to persons
    needs.
  • Infants and children with developmental
    disabilities, have substantially delayed
    development, or congenital or acquired conditions
    and are likely to have limited life involvement
    if services are not provided to them.

73
Behaviors
  • May be overwhelmed by others presence
  • May attempt to run out of fear
  • Is a concrete thinker

74
Behaviorscontinued
  • Needs visual cues to assist in understanding
  • May need a more in-depth explanation of events
  • May be sensitive to touch, creating fight or
    flight reaction

75
Developmental Disorders
  • Autism
  • Mental Retardation

76
Autism
  • Affects 1 to 2 in 1,000 Americans.
  • Appears before age 3.
  • Characteristics abnormal speech patterns, lack
    of eye contact, obsessive body movements, social
    isolation, ritualistic or habitual behavior,
    attachment to objects, resistance to change and
    sensory disorders.

77
AutismCommunication Behaviors
  • May be verbally limited
  • Abnormal pitch, rate or volume when speaking
  • Difficulty expressing needs, ideas or abstract
    concepts
  • Reversal of pronouns or other parts of speech

Communication
78
AutismOther Behaviors
  • Matching, pairing and ordering objects
  • Blinking compulsively
  • Switching lights on and off
  • Jumping, rocking, clapping, chin-tapping,
    head-banging, spinning
  • Fascination with colorful and shiny objects

Communication
79
Mental Retardation
  • Refers to a range of substantial limitations in
    mental functioning manifested in persons before
    the age of 18.

80
Most common Characteristics
  • Inappropriately dressed for season
  • Unusual physical structure
  • Awkwardness of movement/poor motor skills
  • Difficulty writing
  • Obvious speech defects
  • Limited response or understanding
  • Inattentiveness
  • Difficulty describing facts in detail

81
Degrees of Mental Retardation
  • Mild IQ level 50 - 55 to approximately 70
  • Moderate IQ level 35 - 40 to 50 -55
  • Severe IQ level 20 25 to 35 40
  • Profound IQ level Below 20 or 25
  • Severity Unspecified

82
Methods for Questioning
  • Be patient for a reply
  • Repeat question as needed
  • Ask short, simple questions using simple language
  • Speak slowly

83
Methodscontinued
  • Move to a less disruptive location to assist with
    focusing
  • Be non-threatening, but firm and persistent
  • Be highly aware of questioning techniques

84
Physical Appearance Strategies for Identification
  • Inappropriately dressed for season
  • Unusual physical structure
  • Awkwardness of movement/poor motor skills
  • Difficulty writing

85
Speech/Language Strategies for Identification
  • Obvious speech defects
  • Limited response or understanding
  • Inattentiveness
  • Difficulty describing facts in detail

86
Social Behavior Strategies for Identification
  • Adult associating with children or adolescents
  • Eager to please
  • Non-age appropriate behavior
  • Easily influenced by others

87
Mental Illness (MI) vs. Mental Retardation (MR)
  • American Population Statistics 3 MR, 22.1 MI.
  • MI unrelated to intelligence, while MR is
    below-level intellectual functioning.
  • MI develops at any point in life, MR prior to age
    18.
  • No cure for either however, medications can help
    MI.

  • Reference Special Olympics (http//www.specialoly
    mpics .org)

88
Dementia
89
Alzheimers Disease
  • The most common organic disorder of older people.
  • Affects an estimated 2-3 million Americans with
    over 11,000 dying per year.
  • Duration of illness from onset of symptoms to
    death, averages 8 to 10 years

90
Symptoms of Alzheimers
  • Symptoms of disease are progressive
  • The individual may get lost easily.
  • Memory decreases over time.
  • Becomes easily agitated.
  • Symptoms can be psychotic-like in nature.

91
Alzheimers - Additional Facts
  • Alzheimers is a form of dementia.
  • NOT considered a mental illness and most mental
    health facilities do not accept as patients.
  • Drugs can help the progression of the disease but
    there is no cure.

92
Suicide
93
Common Myths about Suicide
  • People who talk about suicide wont commit
    suicide.
  • People who commit suicide are crazy.
  • Once the person begins to improve, the risk has
    ended.
  • Prior unsuccessful suicide attempts means there
    will never be a successful suicide.

94
Suicide and Mental Illness
  • 90 of suicides are reportedly related to
    untreated or under-treated mental illness
  • The most common mental
  • illness associated with
  • suicide is depression

95
Continued
  • Nearly 20 of people diagnosed with bipolar
    disorder die from suicide
  • Nearly 10 to 15 of people diagnosed with
    Schizophrenia die from suicide

96
Evaluating Level of Suicidal Danger
  • Symptoms?
  • Nature of current stressor?
  • Method and degree?
  • Prior attempt?

97
Levels of dangercontinued
  • Acute vs. chronic?
  • Medical status?
  • Chance of rescue?
  • Social resources?

98
Danger to Self
  • Intent (actions/words)
  • Gross neglect for personal safety
  • Specific plan (action/words)
  • Plans/means available

99
Danger to Others
  • Intent (actions/words)
  • Specific person identified
  • Agitated, angry, explosive
  • Irrational, impulsive, reckless (intent/actual)

100
First Minute Assessment
  • Hope to assess in the first minute If person is
    distressed enough that he would create a
    disturbance in the assembly.

101
First Minute Assessment
  • Elements to be observed before conversation
    begins.
  • APPEARANCE
  • Dress Unkempt or Inappropriately?
  • Face Tense, Angry, Sad, Hyper vigilant?
  • Eyes Avoid contact, Stares into space, Glances
    furtively?

102
MOTOR BEHAVIOR
  • Tremors
  • Pacing
  • Fidgeting
  • Gait Unsteady
  • Rigid
  • Exceptionally slow

103
GENERAL ATTITUDE
  • Cheerful Shy Withdrawn Anger Irritable
  • Sullen Suspicious Sarcastic Fearful

104
MOOD/AFFECT
  • Depressed Anxious Apathetic Dramatic
  • Fearful Flat Inappropriate Despondent

105
FIRST VERBAL CONTACT
  • SPEECH Loud Soft Slurred
  • RATE Slow Fast Very Fast
  • QUALITY Incoherent Irrelevant
    Evasive

106
Intellectual Functioning
  • Is the person Confused
  • Difficulty in Understanding
  • Stream of Mental Activity
  • Over Productive
  • Delusions/Hallucinations

107
ADDRESSING A PERSON WITH POSSIBLE MENTAL PROBLEMS
  • Do not Crowd the Person
  • Give your name and ask, or use his name

108
LISTEN
  • Pay attention to what the person is saying
  • Note his dress
  • Note his eyes while talking
  • Note his countenance

Communication
109
ASK
  • How are things for you today?
  • How are things for you today?
  • Listen to reply and empathize or ask them to tell
    you more
  • Do you have any special need that I might help
    you with?
  • Keep your language simple
  • Do not give orders
  • Do not argue

110
ASK (continued)
  • Do not Jump to conclusions
  • Reflect back to the person impressions You look
    SadHappyAngry
  • If a person is in a crisis or distressed their
    behavior reflects it.
  • Look for it.
  • Ask if they would like to talk with someone?

111
REMEMBER
  • Your role is one of identification and protection
    your task is to pass them off to someone else you
    have other work do not be deterred.

112
Personality Disorders
113
Antisocial Personality Disorder Traits
  • Sense of entitlement
  • Unremorseful
  • Unconscionable behavior
  • Blameful of others
  • Manipulative and conning
  • Affectively cold

114
Antisocial Personality Traits (Continued)
  • Failure to conform to social norms
  • Deceitfulness
  • Impulsivity
  • Irritability
  • Aggressiveness
  • Reckless disregard for the safety of self or
    others
  • Irresponsibility
  • Lack of remorse

115
WARNING
  • You will meet the antisocial personality most
    often in the form of an alcoholic.
  • An inebriated person should never be allowed in
    the assembly. If intoxication is suspected
    immediately call for a police officer.

116
Indicators of Alcohol Intoxications
  • Confusion
  • Coordination difficulties
  • Expansive mood
  • Impaired memory
  • Poor judgment
  • Sense of well-being
  • Short attention span
  • Slurred speech
  • Talkativeness

117
Sociopathic Traits
  • Egocentricity
  • Impulsivity
  • Conscience defect
  • Exaggerated sexuality
  • Excessive boasting
  • Risk taking
  • Inability to resist temptation
  • Antagonistic

118
Sociopathic Traits (Continued)
  • Weak conscience
  • No sense of shame
  • Take pride in bending or breaking the rules.
  • Cold, callous attitude toward human suffering
  • Lack empathy
  • Feel cheated by society
  • Chronic complainers

119
Sociopath (Continued)
  • You will meet the sociopath personality in the
    form of a chemical abuser. Any individual high on
    drugs regardless the type has no business in the
    assembly. A police officer should be notified
    immediately. They are a danger to themselves and
    others. Symptoms of drug intoxication are simple
    and obvious to the trained eye

120
Indicators of Drug Use
  • Eye Characteristics
  • Cocaine Dilated
  • Ecstasy Dilated
  • Heroin Constricted
  • Crystal Meth Dilated or Constricted

121
Other Indicators of Drug Use
  • Aggressive behavior (Methamphetamine)
  • Acne Sores (Methamphetamine)
  • Delusions (Methamphetamine)
  • Excitation (Methamphetamine)
  • Impaired Speech (Methamphetamine)
  • Irritability (Methamphetamine)
  • Blurred Vision (Ecstasy)
  • Depression (Ecstasy) (Methamphetamine)
  • Confusion (Cocaine)

122
Substance Abuse Cognitive Disorders
123
Other Indicators of Drug Use
Irrational Behavior (Ecstasy) Jaw Clenching
(Ecstasy) Slow gait (Heroin) Slurred speech
(Heroin) Teeth Grinding (Ecstasy) Excessive
Talking (Methamphetamine) Drowsiness (Heroin)
124
Substance Abuse/Cognitive Disorders Relationship
to Psychosis
  • Prolonged use of drugs may cause symptoms of
    psychosis. (To include alcohol, prescriptions or
    street drugs)
  • May cause damage to the central nervous system
  • Could create defects in perception, language,
    memory, and cognition.

125
WARNING
  • Never take a drug addict for granted
  • Never turn your back on them
  • Drug abusers are usually armed or have weapons
    near at hand.
  • Drug abusers are frequently paranoid.

126
Psychopathic Traits
  • Glib and superficial
  • Grandiose self-
  • Arrogant people who believe they are superior
    human beings.
  • Boredom leads to risky
  • Low self-discipline

127
Psychopathic Traits
  • Pathological liar is crafty, cunning, deceitful,
    and dishonest.
  • Manipulativeness- defraud others for personal
    gain callous ruthlessness, lack of concern for
    the feelings and suffering of one's victims.
  • Lack of remorse or guilt
  • Shallow affect -- emotional poverty or a limited
    range or depth of feelings
  • Callousness and lack of empathy -- a lack of
    feelings cold, contemptuous, inconsiderate, and
    tactless.

128
Psychopathic Traits
  • Parasitic lifestyle exploitative financial
    dependence and inability to begin or complete
    responsibilities.
  • Poor behavioral controls -- easily annoyance,
    impatience, verbal abusive
  • Promiscuous sexual behavior -- numerous affairs,
    history of sexually coercing others into sexual
    activity. Early behavior problems lying, theft,
    cheating, vandalism, bullying, sexual activity,
    fire-setting

129
Psychopathic Traits
  • Lack of realistic, long-term goals a nomadic
    existence, aimless, lacking direction
  • Impulsivity -- inability to resist temptation,
    frustrations, foolhardy, rash, unpredictable,
    erratic, reckless.
  • Irresponsibility -- repeated failure to fulfill
    or honor obligations and commitments
  • Failure to accept responsibility for own actions,
    denial of responsibility,
  • Lack of commitment to a long-term relationship,
    undependable, and unreliable commitments in life

130
Psychopathic Traits
  • Juvenile delinquency -- behavior problems between
    the ages of 13-18 mostly behaviors that are
    crimes or clearly involve aspects of antagonism,
    exploitation, aggression, manipulation, or a
    callous, ruthless takes great pride at getting
    away with crime

131
The Pedophile
  • The pedophile is an example of a person with
    psychopathic traits.
  • They present a great danger to churches.
  • One should not assume that the Catholic church is
    the only church with pedophiles.
  • The pedophile is very difficult to detect because
    they are deceitful. Deceitfulness is difficult to
    detect.

132
Four basic principles govern the detection of
lying
  • People tend to think they are good at detecting
    lies
  • Those who think they can or are suppose too often
    do poorly
  • What people believe to be good indicators of
    untruthfulness, are not
  • Indicators of deception are subtle, and rarely
    used

133
Warning symptoms of a predator pedophile at work
  • Person holds a position that allows easy contact
    with children
  • Someone giving small gifts to children
  • Someone who has limited or no contact with adults
  • Someone who tries to see children outside
    ordinary activity
  • Someone usually not suspected of being a
    pedophile.
  • Person taking undue interest in single parent
    children

134
On Killing
  • The 17 rule
  • How did the Lord deal with this problem?
  • The importance of knowing what you will do

135
Types of behavior that serve as a warning of
possible armed conduct
  • Assess the individual for indicators of intent
  • Upon recognition of possible threat
  • Call for aid
  • Observe the individual for potential weapons
  • Jacket or shirt hanging uneven

136
Types of behavior that serve as a warning of
possible armed conduct
  • Clothing inconsistent with the weather
  • Unnatural bulges
  • Person will not look at you
  • Furtive glance
  • 1,000 yard stare

137
Types of behavior that serve as a warning of
possible armed conduct
  • Person will not look at you
  • Adjusting clothing repeatedly
  • Dragging foot when walking
  • Moving only one arm when walking

138
Lessons from the Amish School House Incident
  • Be prepared
  • Do not depend on law enforcement
  • I Cor. 1013
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