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Title: History Class 6 Mackintosh / Glasgow School; Adler and Sullivan; Chicago School; Frank Lloyd Wright. Part 1


1
History Class 6 Mackintosh / Glasgow
School Adler and Sullivan Chicago School Frank
Lloyd Wright. Part 1
2
Class Logistics
Midterm in 2 weeks Lecture Week 6
3
Charles Rennie Mackintosh
4
House for an Art Lover (1901)
5
House for an Art Lover. (1901) built 1996
6
Hill House (1903)
7
Hill House Interior
8
Daily Record Building. Glasgow (1901)
9
Mackintosh Chair (1904)
10
Glasgow School of Art. Model (1909)
11
Glasgow School of Art. Library
12
Glasgow School of Art (1909)
13
Glasgow School of Art. 1909
14
Mackintosh Illustration Work
15
Macintosh Jewelry
16
Three Studios in Chelsea. (1920)
17
William Le Baron Jenney
Chicago establishment architect. Pioneer of
steel frame construction in his Fair Store of
1892.
18
William Lebaron Jenney. First Leiter Building.
Chicago. 1879
19
William Lebaron Jenney. Home Insurance Building.
1883
20
The Rookery. 1886. Chicago. John Wellborn Root.
(Burnham and Root)
A transitional structure in the evolution of
modern architecture, the Rookery Building employs
both masonry wall-bearing and skeletal frame
construction techniques. It takes its name from a
temporary City Hall and water tank that stood on
the site following the Fire of 1871. A favorite
roost for pigeons, these structures were referred
to as "the rookery."
21
The Rookery. 1886. Chicago. John Wellborn Root.
Interior
22
William Lebaron Jenney. Manhattan Building.
Chicago. 1891
23
Fair Building. 1891. William Lebaron Jenney
24
Fair Building. 1891. Structural Systems
25
Otis Elevator. 1853
26
Louis Sullivan
27
Louis Sullivan
I should say that it would bee greatly for our
aesthetic good if we should refrain entirely from
the use of ornament for a period of years in
order that our thought might concentrate acutely
upon the production of buildings well formed and
comely in the nude. We should thus perforce
eschew many undesirable things, and learn by
contrast how effective it is to think in a
natural, favorous and wholesome way. We shall
have learned however, that ornament is mentally a
luxury, not a necessity, for we shall have
discerned the limitations as well as the great
value of unadorned masses. We have in us
romanticism, and feel a craving to express it.
We feel intuitively that our strong, athletic,
and simple forms will carry with natural ease the
raiment of which we dream - Louis Sullivan.
Ornament in Architecture. 1892
28
Chicago Fire, etc.
Chicago downtown destroyed by fire in 1871.
Olearys cow. Adler and Sullivan preoccupied
with rebuilding chicago.
29
Babson House (1907)
30
Chicago Auditorium 1887-89
31
Chicago Auditorium. Adler and Sullivan.
32
Floating Foundation System
33
Walt Whitman
34
Bradley House
35
Wainwright Mausoleum. 1892.
36
Wainwright Building. 1891. St. Louis.
37
Wainwright Building (Detail)
38
Wainwright Building - Detail
39
Guaranty Building. 1895
40
Carson Pirie Scott Building. 1889-94
41
Carson Pirie Scott Building
42
Columbian Exposition Burnham and Root. 1893.
43
Columbian Exposition
44
Columbian Exposition
45
Daniel Burnham. Proposed Civic Center.
46
Flatiron Building. NY. Daniel Burnham. 1902
47
Monadnock Building. 1884-92. Chicago. Burnham
and Root
48
Ansonia Hotel. New York. 1904. Graves and Doboy.
49
Old Colony Building. 1893-94. Holabird and Roche
50
Old Colony Building. 1893-94. Holabird and Roche
51
Marquette Building. 1894. Holabird and Roche
52
Reliance Building. 1894. Chicago
53
Reliance Building. 1894. Chicago
54
Union Station. Washington DC. Burnham. 1903-07
55
Frank Lloyd Wright Part 1
When in early years I looked south from the
massive stone tower of the Auditorium Building, a
pencil in the hand of a master, the red glare of
the Bessemer steel converters to the south of
Chicago would thrill me as pages of the Arabian
Nights used to with a sense of terror and
romance.
56
Wrights Vision the transformation of
industrial technique through art.
Throughout his career , he OSCILLATED between
the AUTHORITY of Classical order and the VITALITY
of asymmetrical form. Frampton For Sullivan
and Wright, the young egalitarian culture of the
New World could not be based on something so
ponderous and conventionally Catholic as
Richardsons Romanesque. Owen Jones Grammar of
Ornament. 1856. Examples were Indian, Chinese,
Egyptian, Celtic.
57
Frank Lloyd Wright Wrights House. Oak Park.
1889
58
Froebel Blocks
59
Wright. Winslow House. 1893
60
Wright. Winslow House. 1893
Insert house plan here
61
Wright. Rollin Furbeck House. 1897
62
Influence of japanese architecture on Wright.
Wright was influenced by japanese architecture
since 1890. He would have seen the
reconstruction of the ho-o-den temple exhibited
at the Chicago Columbian Exhibition of 1893.
63
Translation of tokonama into hearth
Defined as the use of a permanent element in the
home as a focus for contemplation and ceremony,
tokonama can be seen in Wright's use of the
hearth as the vertical axis from which the
horizontal floors radiate.
64
Wright Lecture of 1901
The Art and Craft of the Machine Lecture
given in 1901 at Jane Addamss Hull House in
Chicago. Wright stated that the machine could
be intelligently used, in accordance with its own
laws, as an agent for abstraction and
purification processes by which architecture
may be redeemed from the ravages of
industrialization
65
Victorian Houses of the Time
66
Frank Lloyd Wright Willits House. 1901
67
Wright. Willits House. 1901
68
Wright. Willits House. 1901
69
Wright. Willits House. 1901
70
Wright. Prairie House. Ladies Home Journal. 1901
71
Frank Lloyd Wright Brigham House. 1915
72
Dana House. 1902
73
Frank Lloyd Wright Fricke House. 1902
74
Wright. Heurtley House. 1902
75
Wright. Martin House. 1904
76
Frank Lloyd Wright Unity Temple
77
Wright. Unity Temple. 1904
78
Wright. Unity Temple. 1904
79
Wright. Unity Temple. 1904
80
Wright. Unity Temple. 1904
81
Wright. Robie House. 1904
82
Wright. Robie House. 1904
83
Frank Lloyd Wright E.Z. Polish Factory. 1905
84
Thomas Hardy House. 1905
85
Larkin Building. Exterior. 1904.
86
Larkin Building. Plan
87
Larkin Building.
88
Richard Bock Sculpture Larkin Building.
89
Larkin Sidechair
90
Wright Atelier
In these fertile years, Wright carefully
assembled an atelier of technicians and
artist-craftsmen to design and realize his vision
of a Gestamkunstwerk a TOTAL WORK OFART. This
team included engineer Paul Mueller, the
landscape architect Wilhelm Miller, the
cabinetmaker George Niedecken, the mosaic
designer Catherine Ostertag, the sculptors
Richard Bock and Alfonso Ianelli, and Orlando
Giannini, who served as Wrights fabricator of
glass and textiles from 1892.
91
Wright. Taliesin. Wisconsin. 1911-1938
92
Wright. Taliesin. Wisconsin.
93
Wright. Fricke House. 1908
94
Wright. H. Adams. 1913
95
Wright. Imperial Hotel. Tokyo. 1916
96
Wright. Imperial Hotel. Tokyo.
97
Wright. Imperial Hotel. Tokyo. 1916
98
Wright. Imperial Hotel. Tokyo. 1916-23
99
Wright. Imperial Hotel. Tokyo. 1916-23
100
Wright. Imperial Hotel. Tokyo. 1916-23
101
The End
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