ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY OF GAZA FACULTY OF NURSING MASTER OF COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH NURSING STANDARD OUTLINE FOR COURSE SYLLABUS Course title: Contemporary mental health nursing Course Instructor: Dr. Ashraf El-Jedi, RN, BSN, MSN, DrPH. Term: First - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY OF GAZA FACULTY OF NURSING MASTER OF COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH NURSING STANDARD OUTLINE FOR COURSE SYLLABUS Course title: Contemporary mental health nursing Course Instructor: Dr. Ashraf El-Jedi, RN, BSN, MSN, DrPH. Term: First

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Title: ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY OF GAZA FACULTY OF NURSING MASTER OF COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH NURSING STANDARD OUTLINE FOR COURSE SYLLABUS Course title: Contemporary mental health nursing Course Instructor: Dr. Ashraf El-Jedi, RN, BSN, MSN, DrPH. Term: First


1
ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY OF GAZAFACULTY OF
NURSINGMASTER OF COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH
NURSINGSTANDARD OUTLINE FOR COURSE
SYLLABUSCourse title Contemporary mental
health nursingCourse Instructor Dr. Ashraf
El-Jedi, RN, BSN, MSN, DrPH.Term First
semester 2009/2010
2
Course description
  • This course allows students to study current
    issues impacting upon the development and
    application of mental health nursing principles.
    It focuses on two central themes 1)
    evidence-based nursing practice and 2) global
    mental health. It provides students with the most
    current, culturally competent, authoritative, and
    comprehensive resource available.

3
Learning objectives
  • At the end of this course the participant will be
    able to
  • Identify different global issues in mental health
    nursing.
  • Be Familiar with trends in provision of care in
    mental health settings.
  • Recognize the most recent Issues relating to
    policy, planning, and clinical nursing practice.
  • Consider ethical issues when practicing mental
    health nursing.
  • Be Familiar with Human rights regarding mental
    health/illness.
  • Identify the most current, culturally competent,
    authoritative, and comprehensive international
    and local resource available.
  • Demonstrate understanding to the most up-to-date,
    evidence-based, culturally competent, practice.

4
Course content schedule
5
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6
Teaching Methods
  • Lectures
  • Discussion
  • Demonstration
  • Audiovisual aids
  • Work group

7
Evaluation
  • Mid term exam 30
  • Assignment and project 20
  • Final exam 50
  • Total 100

8
Course Policies-
  • 1- Students are expected to prepare for lectures
    by reading the assigned material and reviewing
    relevant literature.
  • 2- Attendance of lecture is a requirement. (See
    the university policies regarding absence)
  • 3- Students are expected to attend the exams. Any
    missed exam will result in a grade of zero (0)
    for that exam.

9
References
  • Gail Wiscarz Stuart (2009). Principles and
    Practice of Psychiatric Nursing. 9th Edition
  • Stickley T Basset T (2008). Learning about
    mental health practice. Jone Wiley Sons Inc.
    England

10
Principles of Psychiatric Nursing Care
11
  • You are about to begin a voyage to places you
    have never been before the world of psychiatric
    and mental health nursing, students learned about
    pieces of people-and infected toe, a congested
    lung, a troubling twitch, or maybe even a broken
    heart-but pieces nonetheless.

12
  • Today, students learn about the wholeness of
    people a physically ill child struggling to find
    safety in an abusive family, an adolescent coping
    with eating problems and self-esteem, a young
    adult grieving over the diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, or
    an elder, living alone, feeling confused and
    going to a nursing home.

13
  • This is the exciting world of today's psychiatric
    nurse. It integrates the biological,
    psychological, sociocultural, environmental,
    legal, and ethical realities of life and weaves
    them together in a rich tapestry called
    Psychiatric-mental health nursing practice.

14
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16
Role Emergence
  • The role of psychiatric nursing began to emerge
    in the early 1950s.
  • An article by Bennett and Eaton in the American
    Journal of Psychiatry in 1951 identified the
    following problems affecting psychiatric nurses
  • Scarcity of qualified psychiatric nurses.
  • Underused of their abilities
  • The fact that "very little real psychiatric
    nursing is carried out in otherwise good
    psychiatric hospitals and units".

17
Evolving Functions
  • In 1958 the following function of psychiatric
    nurses were described (Hays, 1975)
  • Dealing with patients' problems of attitude,
    mood, and interpretation of reality.
  • Exploring disturbing and conflicting thoughts
    and feelings.
  • Using the patient's positive feelings toward the
    therapist to bring about psycho physiological
    homeostasis.
  • Counseling patients in emergencies, including
    panic and fear
  • Strengthening the well part of patients.

18
  • The 1970s gave rise to the further development of
    the specialty. Psychiatric nurses became the
    pacesetters in specialty nursing practice. They
    were the first to do the following
  • Develop standards and statements on scope of
    practice.
  • Establish generalist and specialist
    certification.

19
  • The 1980s were years of exciting scientific
    growth in the area of psychobiology. New focus
    was placed on the following
  • Brain-imaging techniques
  • Neurotransmitters and neuronal receptors
  • Psychobiology of emotions
  • Understanding the brain
  • Molecular genetics related to psychobiology.

20
Psychiatric nurses thus entered the 1990s faced
with the challenge of integrating the expanding
bases of neuroscience into the caring and
holistic biopsychosocial practice of psychiatric
nursing.
21
  • By 2000 psychiatric nurses agreed that the
    knowledge base of the specialty is based on the
    integration of the biological, spiritual, social,
    and environmental realms of the human experience
    (Raingruber, 2003 Silverstein, 2006).

22
Contemporary Practice
  • Psychiatric-mental health nursing is an
    interpersonal process that promotes and maintains
    patient behavior that contributes to integrated
    functioning. The patient may be an individual,
    family, group, organization, or community.

23
  • The American Nurses Association's
    Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Scope and
    Standards of Practice (2007) defines
    psychiatric-mental health nursing as "a
    specialized area of nursing practice committed to
    promoting mental health through the assessment,
    diagnoses, and treatment of human responses to
    mental health problems and psychiatric
    disorders. It employs a purposeful use of self
    as its art and a wide range of nursing
    psychosocial and neurobiological theories and
    research evidence as its science."

24
  • The Center for Mental Health Services officially
    recognizes psychiatric nursing as one of the five
    core mental health disciplines.
  • The other four disciplines are marriage and
    family therapy, psychiatry, psychology, and
    social work.

25
Nurse-Patient Partnership
  • The contemporary practice of psychiatric-mental
    health nursing occurs within a social and
    environmental context. Thus the "nurse-patient
    relationship" has evolved into a "nurse-patient
    partnership" that expands the dimensions of the
    professional psychiatric nursing role. These
    elements include clinical competence,
    consumer-family advocacy, mutual responsibility,
    interprofessional collaboration, social
    accountability, and legal-ethical parameters.
    (Figure).

26
Figurer Elements of the Psychiatric-mental
health nursing role.
27
Competent Caring
  • The three domains of contemporary
    psychiatric-mental health nursing practice are
    direct care, communication, and management.
    Within these overlapping domains of practice, the
    teaching, coordinating, delegating, and
    collaborating functions of the nursing role are
    expressed (Figure ).

28
Figurer Psychiatric-mental health nursing
practice.
29
Psychiatric-mental health nurses are able to do
the following
  • Make culturally sensitive biopsychosocial health
    assessments.
  • Design and implement treatment plans for patients
    and families with complex health problems and co
    morbid conditions.
  • Engage in care management activities, such as
    organizing, assessing, negotiating, coordinating,
    and integrating services and benefits for
    individual and families.

30
  • Provide a " health care map" for individuals,
    families, and groups to guide them to community
    resources for mental health, including the most
    appropriate providers, agencies, technologies,
    and social systems.
  • Promote and maintain mental health and manage the
    effects of mental illness through reaching and
    counseling.
  • Provide care for physically ill people with
    psychological problems and psychiatrically ill
    people with physical problems.
  • Manage and coordinate systems of care integration
    the needs of patients, families, staff , and
    regulators

31
Domains of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing
Practice
32
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33
  • Levels of performance
  • Four major factors _ laws, qualifications,
    practice setting, and personal initiative _ play
    a part in determining the roles engaged in by
    each nurse.
  • Laws
  • Nurse practice acts also address aspects of
    advanced practice, including prescriptive
    authority (Staten et al, 2006). Nurses must be
    familiar with the nursing practice act of their
    state and define and limit their practice
    accordingly.

34
  • Qualifications
  • Psychiatric_ mental health registered nurse (RN-
    PMH).
  • Psychiatric _ mental health advanced practice
    Registered nurse (APRN PMH) An advanced
    practice nurse may be either a clinical nurse
    specialist (CNS) or a nurse practitioner (NP).

35
Practice setting
  • Settings for psychiatric- mental health nurses
    include psychiatric facilities, community mental
    health centers, psychiatric units in general
    hospital, residential facilities, and private
    practice. Many psychiatric hospitals have become
    integrated clinical systems that provide
    inpatient care, partial hospitalization or day
    treatment, residential care, home care, and
    outpatient or ambulatory care.
  • Community based treatment setting have expanded
    to include primary care clinics, schools,
    prisons, industrial settings, managed care
    facilities, health maintenance organizations,
    hospices visiting nurse associations, home health
    agencies, emergency departments nursing homes,
    and shelters.

36
  • Psychiatric- mental health nurses are quickly
    moving into the domain of primary care and
    working with other nurses and physic- cians to
    diagnose and treat psychiatric problems in
    patients with comorbid medical conditions.
  • Treatment in a nonpsychiatric environment may be
    more efficient and more acceptable to patients
    and their families.

37
Personal initiative
  • This is a very important factor

38
Psychiatric nursing agenda
  • Psychiatric- mental health nursing continues to
    grow and evolve.
  • More than 80,000 registered nurses are working in
    mental health organizations in the United States
    half are employed in psychiatric hospitals and
    the other half are community based.

39
  • There are more than 20,000 advanced practice
    psychiatric- mental health nurses with graduate
    degrees.
  • To best meet the challenges of the next decade,
    psychiatric nurses need to focus their energies
    on three areas outcome evaluation, leadership
    skills, and political action.

40
Outcome evaluation
  • Psychiatric-mental health nurses must identify,
    describe, measure, and explain the process and
    outcomes of the care they provide to patients,
    families, and communities.
  • "What difference does psychiatric nurse caring
    make?

41
Leadership skills
  • Psychiatric-mental health nurses need knowledge
    and strategies that enable them to exercise
    leadership and management in their work. Such
    leadership has a direct impact on the care
    patients receive. It also strengthens and expands
    the contribution of psychiatric nursing to the
    larger health care system Psychiatric-mental
    health nurses need knowledge and strategies that
    enable them to exercise leadership and management
    in their work. Such leadership has a direct
    impact on the care patients receive. It also
    strengthens and expands the contribution of
    psychiatric nursing to the larger health care
    system

42
Political Action
  • Increasing psychiatric nurses' political
    awareness and skills is necessary to bring about
    needed changes in the mental health care delivery
    system.
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