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A Native American Approach

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Title: A Native American Approach


1
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2
It is time to speak your truth, create your
community and do not look outside yourself for
the leader. We are the ones weve been waiting
for.

Hopi Elders
3
A Native American Approach
By Gary B. Neumann Salish/Pend Orielle
Presented at 2006 IHS / SAMHSA Behavioral
Health Conference June 6, 2006 - Town and
Country Resort San Diego, CA
4
M E D I C I N E W H E E L
FOUR DIRECTIONS
5
North
East
South
West
6
North
East
Emotional
Spiritual
Mental
Physical
South
West
7
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8
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9
  • All Native Cultures believe
  • in a Supreme Being.
  • We believe our traditional
  • ways are knowledgeable
  • about the Natural Order.

North
East
  • We believe that the Elders
  • are a guiding force.
  • Inside of every being
  • is the innate knowledge
  • of Well Being.
  • We believe that all tribal
  • Nations are different from
  • each other.
  • We believe alcohol
  • and drugs are destroying
  • us and we want to recover.

South
West
  • This difference is our strength.
  • We believe that there is a
  • Natural Order running
  • the Universe.

10
A Mohawk Elder, explains
  • The difference that exists is that white
  • doctors medicines tend to be very mechanical.
  • The person is repaired but he is not better than
    he
  • was before.
  • Western Medicine is more focused on symptom
  • suppression.

11
Culturally Sensitive Approach
  • Identifying Strength
  • Observing Nature
  • Uniqueness of all Things
  • Adapt as needed
  • Harmony and balance
  • Teachings and spirituality

Concept Of Well Being Is Understood Differently.
12
Cultural Sensitivity
  • Demonstrates the beliefs, values, and
    assumptions of community.
  • Enables community members to become the owners
    of the process or product
  • Is recognizable to the community as having a
    good fit

What works for the people of the buffalo, may
not work for the people of the whale.
13
Areas for Cultural Sensitivity
  • Definitions and meanings
  • Symbols
  • Language
  • Core Values
  • Assumptions behind processes content
  • Leadership of local community
  • Life ways and Thought ways

14
Cultural Competency
  • To conduct professional work in ways that the
    members of a cultural group recognize as
    appropriate among themselves
  • Engage with community and accept cultural
    differences in an open and genuine manner.

The honor of one is the honor of ALL
15
North
East
Baby
Elder
Spring
Winter
Summer
Fall
Youth
Adult
South
West
16
The Seven Directions Of Knowledge
Spring
Its not to help keep our kids alive Its
to help bury them
tribal member
1. Community Organization
2. Community Assessment
Summer
3. Issues Problems Analysis
4. Strategic Planning
17
The Seven Directions Of Knowledge
Spring
In time, you will smile again and truly feel it
and your laughter will be genuine. But until your
pain has gone away, and your sadness
disappeared, Dont feel like you have to be
strong. What youre feeling is real. Dont feel
like your wrong if you want to cry. There are
some roads in life we must travel alone, Even
though we may be surrounded by people whom we
love. Some things in life, such as what you are
feeling now, Cant be felt by anyone but you But
just remember, you are not alone at all Everyone
who loves you is walking with you in spirit And
will be there with you Youll find a new
strength A new piece A new happiness It just
takes a little time You Are Not Alone
WE MUST CHANGE THIS COMMUNITY NORM

1. Community Organization
2. Community Assessment
Summer
3. Issues Problems Analysis
4. Strategic Planning
18
The Seven Directions Of Knowledge
gt When you Change the Way You Look at Things
The Things you Look At Change gt We move towards
and become like that which you think about gt To
persist until you succeed gt The Creator Elders
Nature will be our teachers gt When the
Community Leads the Leaders will follow gtThe
Creator only made one race Red Yellow Black
White gtWe need each other to Heal
Spring
1. Community Organization
2. Community Assessment
Summer
3. Issues Problems Analysis
4. Strategic Planning
19
The Four Laws Of Change
  • Change is from within.
  • You must create a healing forest.
  • Individual must heal.
  • Nations can heal.
  • Changing in the Spiritual
  • World manifests itself in
  • the Physical World.
  • The whole community
  • must become part of the
  • self development self
  • determination process.

Spring
Winter
  • In order for development
  • to occur it must be
  • preceded by vision.
  • A Great Learning
  • must occur.

Summer
Fall
  • Families can begin healing.
  • Communities Heal.
  • If the community starts thinking
  • about something together - thats
  • what the community moves towards
  • In order for the youth to get
  • well - the community must
  • Simultaneously work on its
  • own wellness.

20
The Seven Directions Of Knowledge
A Healing Forest Seed Root Stem Leaves Bulb Flo
wer Nurturing MUST happen at each level for it to
thrive
Spring
1. Community Organization
2. Community Assessment
21
The Seven Directions Of Knowledge
Spring
1. Community Organization
2. Community Assessment
Summer
Fall
3. Issues Problems Analysis
5. Community Action Intervention
4. Strategic Planning
6. Evaluation of Initiative
22
SAMHSA SPF
23
The Seven Directions Of Knowledge
Spring
Winter
1. Community Organization
7. Promoting Sustaining the Effort
2. Community Assessment
Summer
Fall
3. Issues Problems Analysis
5. Community Action Intervention
4. Strategic Planning
6. Evaluation of Initiative
24
The Seven Directions of Knowledge
75 of Time to Prepare - Build Foundation
Spring
Winter
1. Community Readiness Assessment
2. GONA Training
Summer
Fall
3. WELLBRIETY Trainings
5. Vision Book
4. Coalition Building
6. Community Visioning Process.
7. Planning Implementation
25
Finding The Elders Wisdom
Finding Creator
Finding Your Relationships
Finding Yourself
26
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27
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28
Underage Drinking(Including Binge Drinking)What
Can We Do?The St. Helena Case Study
  • Presentation to
  • IHS / SAMHSA Behavioral Health Conference
  • San Diego, CA
  • Presented by
  • Gary B. Neumann
  • Community Prevention Institute (CPI)
  • 771 Oak Ave. Parkway, Suite 2, Folsom, California
    95630
  • June 6, 2006

29
Overview
  • Getting Started
  • Leadership
  • Getting the facts
  • Dimensions of the problem
  • Resources
  • Developing the plan
  • Forming a team
  • Planning for meetings
  • Action plan (resources/timelines)
  • Case study St. Helena
  • Other considerations

30
Why The Concern?
  • Nine teens die every day from alcohol related
    incidents. (S.D. Youth council, 2004)
  • Alcohol kills far more teens than all other drugs
    combined (S.D. Youth Council)
  • Three leading causes of death for 15 to 24 year
    olds are automobile crashes, homicides and
    suicidesalcohol is the leading factor in all
    three (NIAAA 2003)
  • It has been estimated that over three million
    teenagers are alcoholics. Several million more
    have a serious drinking problem they cannot
    manage on their own (NIAAA 2003)

31
Getting Started
Who needs to (can) be involved?
  • Planning Models
  • Coordinator led
  • Team (school based)
  • Partnership (school/community)

32
Advantages/Disadvantages
Advantages Disadvantages
Coordinator led Control Buy-in Understand school environment More Work! More Work! More Work!
Team (school based) Coordinator Teacher Students Spread work Understand school environment Youth participation Logistics, getting team together Competing Time Commitment
Community Partnership Coordinator Teachers Students Community Spread work (delegate) Task completion more likely Ownership Spread Organizational logistics
33
Start-Up Issues
  • Leadership
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Recruitment
  • Depends on Planning Model
  • Resources
  • Assistance
  • Funding
  • Timeline 1 year effort minimum

34
Getting the Facts 1Dimensions of the Problem
  • SOURCES
  • Survey Data
  • National Data (Household survey, MTF)
  • CSS (State)
  • CHKS District/school specific
  • CHP
  • Drinking/driving accidents
  • Drinking/driving arrests
  • DOJ
  • Adolescent arrests
  • Compile information in easy to understand
    graphics they are one of your marking tools.
    Profile your community.
  • Present community data by demographics (age,
    gender, ethnicity)
  • Compile information in easy to understand
    graphics they are one of your marking tools.

35
Getting the Facts 1Dimensions of the Problem
  • SOURCES continued
  • Profile your community
  • Present community data by demographics (age,
    gender, ethnicity)
  • Compile information in easy to understand
    graphics - they are one of your marking tools.

36
Getting the Facts 2Identifying Resources
  • WHAT KINDS OF RESOURCES
  • People!
  • What can they contribute?
  • Who can help?
  • Identify all individuals school/community
  • Map the Environment
  • Current programs list out all
    programs/resources that could be involved
  • Outside Support
  • Technical assistance
  • Compile resource Inventory

37
Develop and Implement the Action Plan
  • Form a team
  • Determine type of team
  • Contact members
  • Collect and review Facts
  • Dimensions of the problem
  • Potential resources
  • Conduct Planning meetings
  • Introductory meeting
  • Tasking meeting

38
Develop and Implement the Action Plan continued
  • Conduct additional data collection
  • Example Youth led focus groups
  • Example Social norm survey
  • Present Findings and Recommendations
  • Organize Presentation
  • Implementation
  • Identify work group areas (based on
    recommendations)
  • Solicit additional volunteers
  • Develop process to monitor progress

39
St. Helena Case Study Background Structure
  • Youth Death (DUI)
  • Concerned Parents
  • Supervisor Involvement
  • Called a planning meeting

Meeting Structures (four types) took place over
10 months.
40
Meetings Structure 1 Matchstick Group
  • Membership
  • 5-6 people (met 2x)
  • Purpose
  • Discussed various planning options

41
Meetings Structure 2 Kindling Group
  • Membership
  • 12-15 people (met 5x)
  • Purpose
  • Review/Discussed next steps/stage
  • Set up Process for focus groups

Data Collection Youth Led Focus Groups
DATA Collection Process Youth Led Focus Groups
42
Meetings Structure 3 Bonfire Group
  • Membership
  • Community 60 plus (met once)
  • Purpose
  • Review findings and recommendations
  • Community members joined one of the 6 work groups

43
Meetings Structure 4 Work Groups
  • Membership
  • 4-6 per work group
  • Purpose
  • Implement recommendations

44
Youth Led Focus Groups Process
  • Recruitment ( 14 youths)
  • Training (2 Sessions)
  • Questions Developed by planning group
  • Youth Volunteers paid
  • Role played the questions
  • Focus Groups
  • Five Youth-led Sessions
  • Approximately 60 participants(all paid 10/20)
  • Report Prepared (CPI)
  • Presentation to Bonfire Community Meetings

45
Questions . . . Ten questions in three sets
  • SET 1 How Youth spent their time when not in
    school and percieved opportunities to be
    involved
  • SET 2 Youth perceptions concerning adult
    support for them in their communities (ie, do
    you feel like adults in the community
    encourages value and value you as part
    of the community?)
  • SET 3 Role of alcohol and/or drugs in their life

46
Findings . . . . .
  1. Alcohol use is common
  2. Social acceptance of alcohol use by peers
  3. Availability and access
  4. Reasons to use differentiated by intent
  5. At risk behaviorslack of concern re excessive
    drinking
  6. Adult relationships with teen generally positive

47
Framework for Recommendations
  1. Must address issues raised by teens
  2. Must be based on approaches demonstrating prior
    success
  3. Must be doable (low cost/minimum resources)
  4. Must include community members
  5. Must involve youths and adults

48
Recommendations
  • School Based
  • Risk Management
  • Availability and Access
  • Media
  • Community Development
  • Parent Education and Intervention

49
Risk Management Recommendations
  • SADD
  • Parent/Child Pledges
  • Harm Reduction Information on Alcohol

50
Availability Recommendations
  • Responsible Beverage Service Training
  • Enforcement
  • Compliance Checks
  • Social Host Ordinance

51
Media Recommendations
  • Media Advocacy
  • Awareness Campaigns

52
Community Development and Youth Leadership
  • Youth Advisory Task Force
  • Friday Night Live
  • Community Development Framework

53
Parent Education and Intervention
  • Parent Skills Training
  • Brief Intervention Training

54
Lessons Learned . . . . .
  • Payments important ( minimal)
  • Youth prepared notes were problematic
  • Planning/scheduling is critical
  • Recruitment
  • Diversity (age, student types)
  • Conclusion
  • Youth led Focus Groups can be an important way to
    gather information and involve youth

55
Status
  • 5 of 6 Work Groups meet every month (5-10
    members)
  • Special Projects (recommendations) are being
    pursued
  • Youth media campaign
  • Brief Intervention
  • RBS
  • Place of last drink survey
  • Parents involvementFamily Resource Center
  • Implementation SADD
  • Interest in a SAP

56
Next Steps . . . .
  • CPI will work with up to FIVE School Districts in
    developing / Supporting an Underage Drinking
    Planning Process
  • Evaluate and Monitor Process for Sustainability
    and Enhance as Needed

57
Wolf Project
  • Presentation to
  • IHS / SAMHSA Behavioral Health Conference
  • San Diego, CA
  • Presented by
  • Gary B. Neumann
  • Community Prevention Institute (CPI)
  • 771 Oak Ave. Parkway, Suite 2, Folsom, California
    95630
  • June 6, 2006

58
  • Cherokee Wisdom The Two
    Wolves
  • One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson
    about a battle that goes on inside people.
  • He said, "My son, the battle is between two
    "wolves" inside us all.

59
  • One is Evil.
  • It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret,
    greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment,
    inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and
    ego.

60
  • The other is Good.
  • It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility,
    kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity,
    truth, compassion and faith."

61
  • The grandson thought about it for a minute and
    then asked his grandfather
  • "Which wolf wins?"

62
  • The old Cherokee simply replied,
  • "The one you feed."

63
Wolf Project
Dedicated to the Memory of Michael Wolf and all
other friends, family and community members that
have passed on before their time.
64
Overview
  • Getting Started
  • Leadership
  • Getting the facts
  • Dimensions of the problem
  • Resources
  • Developing the plan
  • Forming a team
  • Planning for meetings
  • Action plan (resources/timelines)
  • Case study St. Helena
  • Other considerations Anderson Valley Model
    Local Video Review
  • Montana Meth Project Case Studies / Flathead
    Reservation Similar Community

65
Why The Concern?
  • Eighth graders in rural areas are 59 percent more
    likely than their counterparts in large cities to
    use methamphetamine.
  • 44 percent of Montana teens report that meth is
    easy to get second only to marijuana. The
    percentage jumps to 66 percent among young adults
    ages 18-24
  • It is estimated that 122 meth labs requiring
    decontamination and sanitation cost over
    1,000,000.
  • On the Wind River Reservation, meth was rarely
    found a mere five years ago and now is described
    as steadily annihilating the reservations
    communities.
  • According to the National Drug Intelligence
    Center 32 of every 100,000 people nationwide
    use meth.

66
Why The Concern?
  • In Round Valley meth was a contributing factor in
    98 of the Child Protective Service placements in
    December.
  • Meth dealers sell it as a diet aide for
    adolescents girls, an energy supplement for
    overworked moms or an escape from everyday
    reality for bored young adults.
  • Many of the chemicals used to make meth are
    common items like lantern fuel, household
    cleaners, nail polish remover, swimming pool
    cleaner and diet and cold pills, and lab
    equipment can be purchased at a drugstore or
    hardware store.
  • On the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana
    meth busts have involved labs packed into duffle
    bags.
  • In Montana alone, meth related admissions to
    state approved chemical dependency treatment
    providers have increased by 70 percent in 5
    years.

67
Why The Concern?
  • A recent article in the Denver Post dubbed Indian
    Country meths new market, as drug gangs from
    other areas move onto reservations, reportedly
    targeting alcoholic Native Americans as potential
    new meth addicts.
  • The close-knit nature of reservations aids in the
    rapid spread of meth use.

68
Why The Concern?
  • Methamphetamine Related Incidents in Round Valley
    2002-17 / 2003 15 / 2004 23 / 2005 51 over
    100 increase from the previous year (source)
  • Bookings with Gang Affiliation Mendo
    County(source)
  • Bookings with Gang Affiliation by year Covelo
    (source) conservative estimate as bookings do not
    get reported as meth specific

69
Current Partners
  • Business Bar Owner / Real Estate Broker
  • Round Valley Health Center
  • State Alcohol and Drug Program
  • School District Superintendent / Board of
    Education / Principal, HS/MS/ES /Nutrition
    Coordinator, Youth
  • Red Road
  • NAIGSO
  • Mental Health Dept / LCSW
  • Mendocino County Supervisor Hal Wagenet
  • Private Citizens Family and Concerned Citizens
  • Domestic Violence Program
  • Juvenile Probation
  • Adult Probation
  • Drug Court
  • Juvenile Justice Commission
  • Recovery Community / NA and AA
  • Yuki Trails Health Center
  • Law Enforcement Tribal Police / MCSO
  • Housing Authority Building Horizons
  • Ranching Community FFA / 4-H / Rodeo

70
NEED TO BE Partners
  • Round Valley Health Center RVIHC Employees Need
    to Be Invited
  • State Alcohol and Drug Program
  • School District Parents / School Teachers/Staff
    School Board Members Principal of High School
  • Principal of Middle School / Principal of
    Elementary School / Alternative School
  • Round Valley Tribal Council Members /
    Individually
  • Housing Board Members

71
Getting the Facts (cont)
  • Outside Support
  • Technical assistance Community Prevention
    Institute
  • County Office of Education
  • Grants
  • Foundations
  • White Bison
  • Compile resource Inventory

72
Project Member Tasks
  • Meth related stats for RV DONE
  • School Data CHKSurvey C C to administer in
    Spring 2006
  • Youth Led Focus Groups Initial Meeting Feb 1st
    / Youth Training March 1st / Youth Recruitment
    efforts and Final Focus Group Training late March
    or April 1, 2006
  • Howard Memorial RV Overdose
  • AODP Gene Price / Willits C C
  • Domestic Violence DONE
  • Juvenile Probation DONE

73
TASKS (continued)
  • Probation Dept M H
  • Juvenile Hall C C
  • MH MA / LCSW / MB / AB
  • POMO Court MS LD DR
  • VORP C C / AO
  • DSS / CPS LD
  • Law Enforcement - DONE

74
TASKS (continued)
  • FAITH COMMUNITY - AW
  • Round Valley Health Center Yuki Trails MB /
    AB
  • Fire Dept / EMT LD
  • OTHER SOURCES ICWA/ CAL WORKS
  • OTHER Lions Club / 25,000 Grant from County
    for Skate Rink

75
Develop and Implement the Action Plan (Notice
what has already been accomplished)
  • Form a team
  • Determine type of team
  • Contact members
  • Collect and review Facts
  • Dimensions of the problem
  • Potential resources
  • Conduct Planning meetings
  • Introductory meeting
  • Tasking meeting

76
Develop and Implement the Action Plan continued
  • Conduct additional data collection
  • Example Youth led focus groups
  • Example Social norm survey
  • Example CHKS in April/May
  • Present Findings and Recommendations
  • Wolf Project Team Members to meet 1st Wed / Month
    from 10-1 in Fire Hall
  • Wolf Project Community members agreed to meet 1st
    Wed /Month for Community Report Card
  • Implementation
  • Identify work group areas (based on
    recommendations)
  • Solicit additional volunteers
  • Develop process to monitor progress (Monthly
    Report Card)

77
Meetings Structure Work Groups
  • Membership
  • 4-6 per work group
  • Agreed to have each Meeting or Activity have
    Spiritual / Cultural Opening and Closing in a
    Good Way
  • Purpose
  • Implement recommendations

78
  • Stories can help people feel more connected to
    the place where they live.
  • Feeling more connected to a place gives us a
    better understanding not just a mental
    understanding, but an emotional understanding.
    An emotional understanding and connection helps
    us to feel we are more a part of the things and
    to care for a place. Its easier not to care when
    you dont have a connection to a place.

79
  • In recent centuries our home has become the legal
    possession of strangers. We have been restricted
    from approaching our places of power and spirit.
    We have become mute witnesses while others
    despoil the air, the land, the wildlife, the
    rivers, and the ocean waters. It is said that
    this world was created for original native
    people, not for wanderers. But it is the
    wanderers who have brought a different rule,
    saying that our ancient laws are of no value.

80
  • This may be one of the reasons why we are in a
    spiritual quandary not knowing how to become a
    functioning part of the invading American
    society, not remembering how to sustain a strict
    connection with the knowing that is our origin
    and trembling in the presence of both.

81
  • The Round Valley Community has taken the approach
    to learn who they are and educate themselves
    and their families as to who are their ancestors
    and where do they fit into the community, i.e.,
    land ownership, who lived where, etc. to help
    youth connect and feel a sense of belonging

82
  • To that end they are utilizing a fan of eagle
    feathers or hawk feathers and holding talking
    circle sessions utilizing respect honor
    dignity when someone talks while holding the
    fan others see this as their time and give them
    honor to share from their heart.

83
Youth Led Focus Groups Process
  • Maggie Escobedo-Steele - Consultant
  • Training Session 1
  • A deep inquiry into what is important for the
    community to know that can only come from the
    youth
  • Here are the kind of leaders we want to be
  • Here are the monsters we want to slay
  • WE HAVE K N O W CHOICE
  • N E P I
  • O E T S
  • W D I D
  • L O O
  • E N M
  • D S
  • G
  • E

84
Youth Led Focus Groups Process (continued)
  • Trainers - Maggie Escobedo-Steele / Gary Neumann
    / Anne Oliver / Martin Martinez
  • Following Session 1 Group opted to present at
    evening Report Card Meeting
  • they spoke clearly and honestly, describing the
    real monsters in our community as being
    alcohol, meth and heroin and people forcing
    these drugs on others. Adults need to know
    that were tired of all the drugs and alcohol
    abuse and the bad community it creates we are
    ashamed to say we come from Covelo (quoted from
    local newspaper article)

85
Youth Led Focus Groups Process (continued)
  • Youth learned about Monthly County AOD meeting
    and asked if they could present their issues and
    share their concerns about lack of funding for
    projects in their community Gained commitment
    to present and be trained and prepared.

86
Youth Led Focus Groups Process (continued)
  • Session 2 Focus Group Training (Planned)
  • Questions Developed by planning group
  • Youth Volunteers paid -
  • Role played the questions
  • Focus Groups
  • Five Youth-led Sessions
  • Approximately 60 participants(all paid 10/20)
  • Report Prepared (CPI)

87
Questions . . . Suggestions for Focus Groups
  • How Common is drug use in Round Valley
  • Do you feel Safe in Round Valley
  • What do you know about meth, alcohol and drug use
    in Round Valley
  • Do you feel useful or important in your family
  • Does your family say they love you?

88
FINDINGS
  • Report Focus Group Findings to Larger Community

89
Framework for Recommendations
  1. Must address issues raised by teens
  2. Must be based on approaches demonstrating prior
    success
  3. Must be doable (low cost/minimum resources)
  4. Must include community members
  5. Must involve youths and adults

90
Recommendations FOR EACH RECOMMENDATION WOLF
PROJECT SHOULD MATCH
  • School Based
  • Risk Management
  • Availability and Access
  • Media
  • Community Development
  • Parent Education and Intervention
  • Cultural Aspects / Language / Sweats

91
Risk Management Recommendations Wolf Project
Integrate Other Options -
  • SADD
  • Parent/Child Pledges
  • Harm Reduction Information on Alcohol

92
Availability Recommendations
  • Responsible Beverage Service Training
  • Enforcement
  • Compliance Checks
  • Social Host Ordinance
  • WHAT COULD OTHER OPTIONS BE

93
Media Recommendations
  • Media Advocacy
  • Local regular Newspaper Update
  • Awareness Campaigns
  • OTHER OPTIONS

94
Community Development and Youth Leadership
  • Youth Advisory Task Force-Meet with County and do
    presentation
  • Friday Night Live
  • Community Development Framework 40 Assets
    Training
  • Red Road / White Bison Bring HOOP to Covelo
  • UNITY
  • ACOA Training at Wellness Day June 24th

95
Parent Education and Intervention
  • Parent / Teacher Skills Training
  • Brief Intervention Training
  • Brief Intervention For Parents Training (Being
    Developed)
  • OTHER OPTIONS

96
Lessons Learned . . . . .
  • Payments important ( minimal)
  • Youth prepared notes were problematic
  • Planning/scheduling is critical
  • Recruitment
  • Diversity (age, student types)
  • Conclusion
  • Youth led Focus Groups can be an important way to
    gather information and involve youth

97
Next Steps . . . .
98
Community Red Road Pledge
  • I promise not to teach your family how to get
    high -
  • AND you promise not to teach mine.

99
  • 1 - WOLF PROJECT COMMITTEE
  • 2 - DRUGS/ALCOHOL IN SCHOOLS COMMITTEE
  • 3 - UNDERAGE DRINKING CRISIS COMMITTEE
  • 4 - MEDIA CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE
  • 5 - AWARENESS/TRAINING CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE

100
  • NEXT MEETING
  • Assignments
  • Responsibilities
  • WHAT ARE YOU
  • WILLING TO DO

101
Community Prevention Institutegary_at_emt.orgca-cp
i.org
102
LEM LMTS Thank You in My Salish Language
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