High-Impact Practices: Implementing Essential Learning Outcomes in an Engaged University Utah Valley University March 2009 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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High-Impact Practices: Implementing Essential Learning Outcomes in an Engaged University Utah Valley University March 2009

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Title: High-Impact Practices: Implementing Essential Learning Outcomes in an Engaged University Utah Valley University March 2009


1
High-Impact Practices Implementing Essential
Learning Outcomes in an Engaged UniversityUtah
Valley UniversityMarch 2009
2
What is LEAP?
  • (LEAP) is an initiative that champions the value
    of a liberal education and focuses campus
    practice on fostering essential learning outcomes
    for all students, whatever their chosen field of
    study. LEAP seeks to engage the public with core
    questions about what really matters in college,
    to give students a compass to guide their
    learning, and to make a set of essential learning
    outcomes the preferred framework for educational
    excellence, assessment of learning, and new
    alignments between school and college.

3
www.aacu.org Association of American Colleges
and Universities
4
Narrow Learning is Not EnoughThe Essential
Learning Outcomes
  • Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical
    and Natural World
  • Focused by engagement with enduring and
    contemporary big questions
  • Intellectual and Practical Skills
  • Practiced extensively across the curriculum, in
    the context of progressively more challenging
    problems, projects, and standards for
    performance
  • Personal and Social Responsibility
  • Anchored through active involvement with diverse
    communities and real-world challenges
  • Integrative and Applied Learning
  • Demonstrated through the application of
    knowledge, skills,
  • and responsibilities to new settings and complex
    problems

5
Utah Valley Outcomes
  • Engaged, integrated, and applied learning
  • Intellectual and practical skills
  • People of integrity
  • Professional competency
  • Stewards of place
  • Knowledge foundation

6
My Outline
  • Why Focus on These Outcomes?
  • Why Focus on These Practices?
  • What Are We Actually Focused On? Where? For Whom?
  • How Are We Doing? How Do We Know? How Do Students
    Know?
  • Can We Do This In Both Gen Ed and the Major?

7
Why These Outcomes?The World is Demanding More
  • Changes in the balance of economic and political
    powerthe Rise of the Rest
  • Global economy in which innovation is key to
    growth and prosperity
  • Rapid change and innovation as new realities in
    workplace, economy, communities
  • Global interdependence and increasingly complex
    cross-cultural interactions
  • The need to renew democratic institutions and
    civic values, and build more inclusive communities

8
Emerging Consensus on Essential Outcomes
  • Educators
  • Accreditors
  • Civic and Philanthropic Leaders
  • Business Leaders
  • Notestudents dont know about this consensuswe
    need to communicate this clearly to them.

9
Employers Also Endorse the Essential Learning
Outcomes
  • Liberal Education has always been valued for
    its role in preparing students for democratic
    participation and personal fulfillment. But in
    todays knowledge economy, it has also become the
    must-have for economic opportunity and
    professional success.
  • Carol Geary Schneider
  • President, AACU

10
Employers ViewsPercentage of Employers Who
Want Colleges to Place more Emphasis on
Essential Learning Outcomes
  • Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and
    Natural World
  • Science and Technology 82
  • Global Issues 72
  • The role of the US in the world 60
  • Cultural values and traditions (U.S./global) 53
  • Intellectual and Practical Skills
  • Teamwork skills in diverse groups 76
  • Critical thinking and analytic reasoning 73
  • Written and oral communication 73
  • Information literacy 70
  • Creativity and innovation 70
  • Complex problem solving 64
  • Quantitative reasoning 60

11
Employers ViewsPercentage of Employers Who
Want Colleges to Place more Emphasis on
Essential Learning Outcomes
  • Personal and Social Responsibility
  • Intercultural competence (teamwork in diverse
    groups) 76
  • Intercultural knowledge 72
  • Ethics and values 56
  • Cultural values and traditions (U.S./global) 53
  • Integrative and Applied Learning
  • Applied knowledge in real-world settings 73

Note These findings are taken from a survey of
employers commissioned by AACU and conducted by
Peter D. Hart Associates in November and December
2006. For a full report on the survey and its
complete findings, see www.aacu.org/leap
12
What Business Leaders Say
  • We need the flexible intellectual tools to be
    problem solvers, to be able to continue learning
    over time. In such periods of change, its not
    simply what you know that counts but the ability
    to use what you know.
  • David Kearns, Xerox Corporation

13
What Business Leaders Say
  • I look for people to take accountability,
    responsibility, and are good team people over
    anything else. I can teach the technical.
  • Business Executive, Milwaukee, WI

14
High-Impact Educational Practices What They Are,
Who Has Access to them, and Why They Matterby
George D. Kuh(AACU, 2008)
15
Outcomes of High Impact Practices for Underserved
Students A Review of the Literatureby Lynn
Swaner and Jayne Brownell(2009 Draft online at
www.aacu.org)
16
The Crucial Role of High-Impact Educational
Practices
  • First-Year Seminars and Experiences 
  • Common Intellectual Experiences
  • Learning Communities
  • Writing-Intensive Courses
  • Collaborative Assignments and Projects
  • Undergraduate Research
  • Diversity/Global Learning
  • Service Learning, Community-Based Learning
  • Internships
  • Capstone Courses and Projects

17
Why Focus on High-Impact Educational Practices?
  • Require deeper engagementwith faculty, with
    peers, with material, with community, with
    knowledge in action
  • Impact for all students greater impact for less
    well-prepared and students of color
  • Connect organically to essential outcomes

18
High-Impact Practices Why Do They Work?
Engagement
  • Increase meaningful interaction with faculty and
    peers
  • Increase time spent on writing, research,
    analytic thinking
  • Increase hands-on and collaborative learning

19
High-Impact Practices
  • Correlated with levels of academic challenge,
    active and collaborative learning,
    student-faculty interaction
  • Correlated with higher GPA, higher retention
    rates, greater satisfaction rates

20
Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts
Educationwww.liberalarts.wabash.edu
21
Wabash Findings
  • Good Teaching and High-Quality Interactions with
    Faculty
  • Academic Challenge and High Expectations
  • Diversity Experiences

22
Good Teaching and High-Quality Interactions with
Faculty
  • Academic motivation
  • Critical Thinking
  • Diversity and challenge
  • Leadership
  • Moral reasoning
  • Need for Cognition
  • Political and Social Involvement
  • Positive Attitude Toward Literacy
  • Well-Being

23
Academic Challenge and High Expectations
  • Academic Motivation
  • Desire for professional success
  • Diversity and challenge
  • Leadership
  • Moral reasoning
  • Need for cognition
  • Political and social involvement
  • Positive attitude toward literacy
  • Well-Being

24
Diversity Experiences
  • Critical Thinking
  • Desire to contribute to the arts
  • Diversity and challenge
  • Leadership
  • Need for cognition
  • Political and social involvement
  • Positive attitude toward literacy

25
The Bad NewsNot Enough Students Get These
Practices
  • Learning communities17
  • Undergraduate research19
  • Service learning36 first year 46 seniors
  • Senior experience32
  • Sources High-Impact Educational Practices
    (AACU, 2008)

26
Wabash Study FindingsHow many students report
getting these experiences?
  • Good Teaching/High-Quality Interactions (28
    larger institutions 44 smaller institutions)
  • Academic Challenge/High Expectations (18 larger
    institutions 26 smaller institutions)
  • Diversity Experiences (3 larger institutions 5
    smaller institutions)

27
Who Takes Which Courses?
  • First-generation students take fewer courses than
    others in
  • mathematics
  • science
  • social studies
  • humanities
  • history
  • foreign languages
  • computer science
  • Source National Center for Education Statistics,
    First-Generation Students in Postsecondary
    Education (2005)

28
Questions for Utah Valley State
  • Do you have these practices? On which ones do you
    want to focus?
  • How many students participate? Which ones?
  • Underrepresented studentswhich majors, honors,
    course-taking patterns, extracurricular
    activities
  • Are high-impact practices required or optional?
  • Are they in both gen ed and majors? Just some
    majors?

29
AACU Member Survey Selected Findings on Use of
High-Impact Practices
  • 19 require all students to do capstone work in
    general education 10 offer capstones, but do
    not require them
  • 78 placing more emphasis in last 5 years on
    undergraduate research
  • 68 placing more emphasis on service learning
  • 54 placing more emphasis on first-year seminars
  • 52 placing more emphasis on learning communities

30
How Are We Doing?How Do We Know?How Do Students
Know?
  • Accounting of practices
  • Assessing learning outcomes
  • across the institution
  • for each individual student (transcripts,
    e-portfolios, supplemental transcripts)

31
How Should Colleges Assess and Improve Student
Learning?
  • Key findings from survey among 305 business
    leaders and 510 recent college graduates
    conducted November 8 December 12, 2007 for
  • The Association of American
    Colleges and Universities

32
Employers Evaluate College Graduates Preparedness
Very well prepared(8-10 ratings) 39 38 38 35
32 30 28 24 22 26 23 18
Not well prepared(1-5 ratings) 17 19
19 21 23 23 26 30 31 37
42 46
Meanrating 7.0 6.9 6.9 6.7 6.7 6.6 6.5 6.3 6.3 6
.1 5.9 5.7
Teamwork Ethical judgment Intercultural
skills Social responsibility Quantitative
reasoning Oral communication Self-knowledge Adapta
bility Critical thinking Writing Self-direction Gl
obal knowledge
ratings on 10-point scale 10 recent college
graduates are extremely well prepared on each
quality (How Should Colleges Assess and Improve
Student Learning? AACU/Peter D. Hart, 2008)
33
Employers Find College Transcripts Of Limited Use
In Evaluating Potential
How useful do you find the college transcript in
helping you evaluate job applicants potential to
succeed at your company?
Not sure
Very useful
Fairly useful
Not useful
Just somewhat useful
34
Assessments Usefulness In Helping Employers
Evaluate College Graduates Potential
Faculty supervisors assessment of applicants
student internship/ community-based project
applying college learning in real-world setting
67
Sample of applicants student senior project and
overview of faculty assessment of the project
61
Electronic portfolio of applicants college work,
including accomplishments in key skill areas and
faculty assessments
56
Applicants score on essay test to evaluate level
of problem-solving, writing, and
analytical-thinking skills
54
Applicant colleges score showing how the college
compares to others in advancing students
critical-thinking skills
36
Applicants score on multiple-choice test of
general content knowledge
29
35
VALUEValid Assessment of Learning in
Undergraduate Education
  • Work with campuses that have experience with
    electronic portfolios
  • Create rubrics and scoring guides for each
    outcome to evaluate levels of achievement using
    student work in portfolios
  • Funded by FIPSE and State Farm Insurance

36
Teagle Foundation Project on Disciplines and
Undergraduate Liberal Education
  • Religion, Economics, Biochemistry and Molecular
    Biology, History, and English and Foreign
    Languages (MLA)
  • Reports online at www.teaglefoundation.org
  • Summaries forthcoming in Liberal Education
    (spring 2009)

37
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology
  • Compared ASBMB Outcomes to LEAP Outcomes
  • Surveyed institutions on outcomes and practices

38
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology Survey Findings
  • About half followed recommended curriculum most
    included elements
  • BMB major strong on intellectual/practical
    skills, lacking in skills for personal and social
    responsibility
  • Integrative and critical thinking valued, but
    appears mainly at advanced levels
  • Typical pedagogy not reflective of latest
    research on learning (80 lecture format)
  • Undergraduate research valued, but only at
    advanced levels and limited to some students

39
Principles of Excellence
  • Principle OneAim Highand Make Excellence
    Inclusive
  • Principle TwoGive Students a Compass
  • Principle ThreeTeach the Arts of Inquiry and
    Innovation
  • Principle Four Engage the Big Questions
  • Principle FiveConnect Knowledge with Choices
    and Action
  • Principle SixFoster Civic, Intercultural, and
    Ethical Learning
  • Principle SevenAssess Students Ability to
    Apply Learning to complex Problems

40
For full LEAP Report and poll data www.aacu.org/l
eap humphreys_at_aacu.org
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