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Georgia Competent Applicator of Pesticides Program (GCAPP)

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Title: Georgia Competent Applicator of Pesticides Program (GCAPP)


1
Georgia Competent Applicator of
PesticidesProgram (GCAPP)
Georgia Department of Agriculture
  • Frank Hancock, Henry Co. Agriculture Natural
    Resource Agent
  • Paul Guillebeau, Professor, Department of
    Entomology
  • Doug Jones, Georgia Department of Agriculture

2
The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension
and the Georgia Department of Agriculture
developed the GCAPP program to protect human
health and the environment by providing training
for pesticide applicators who are not required to
have an applicators license. Instructors may
adapt specific information (e.g. pesticide
products) to better fit their audience. Product
names do not imply endorsement or criticism by
the University of Georgia or the Georgia
Department of Agriculture.
3
What is a Pesticide?
  • -cide to kill
  • Pesticides - designed to control populations of
    organisms causing problems for humans.
  • Pesticide is a broad term including
  • Herbicides Rodenticides
  • Fungicides Nematicides
  • Bactericides Insecticides etc.

4
What is a Pest?
  • Pests compete with humans, domestic animals, and
    desirable plants for nutrients and water.
  • Pests may injure humans, domestic animals,
    desirable plants, and structures.
  • Some pests spread disease.
  • Some pests annoy humans or domestic animals.
  • A pest can be any organism that is not wanted or
    is in the wrong place at the wrong time.

5
Advantages of Modern Pesticides
  • Save human lives by controlling pests that spread
    diseases like malaria or encephalitis.
  • Increase food supplies and reduce food costs.
  • Increase profit for farmers.
  • Control pests quickly. Pesticides may be the only
    rapid solution to uncontrolled pest populations.

6
Disadvantages of Modern Pesticides
  • May be toxic to humans.
  • May harm the environment.
  • May kill non-target arthropods (e.g., insects,
    spiders) that help control pest populations.
  • Many applications do not reach the target.
  • Less than 2 of insecticides applied reach target
    insect
  • 5 reaches target plantthe rest goes into the
    environment
  • Pests may develop genetic resistance to
    pesticides.

7
Labeling
  • Labeling includes the product label and all the
    other information referenced on the label.
  • You must read and follow the label and any
    supplemental labeling information.

8
Pesticide Classification
  • The EPA classifies pesticides as unclassified or
    Restricted Use.
  • An unclassified pesticide may be purchased or
    used by any adult.
  • Restricted Use Pesticides must be purchased by a
    licensed applicator and applied under their
    supervision.
  • Georgia and some other states require a license
    for any commercial application of pesticides.

9
Restricted Use Pesticides (RUP)
  • A box on the front panel identifies RUP.
  • RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDE
  • For retail sale to and use only by certified
  • applicators, or persons under their
    direct
  • supervision and only for the uses covered
    by
  • the certified applicators certification.

10
Pesticide Label Information
  • Brand name
  • Ingredients
  • Formulation
  • Signal word DANGER, WARNING, CAUTION
  • Directions for use
  • Hazards to humans, animals, and the environment
  • Personal Protective Equipment Requirements
  • First Aid
  • Registration number, manufacturer name/address
  • Net contents

11
Pesticide Ingredients
  • The active ingredients are specified on the
    label.
  • This information can help you compare different
    pesticide products.
  • Inert ingredients are not identified.

12
Signal words
  • DANGER pesticides are extremely dangerous
  • A very small amount of a DANGER-POISON pesticide
    will kill a human or pet
  • DANGER pesticides can cause severe eye/skin
    injury
  • WARNING larger amounts will injure humans
  • CAUTION pesticides are the least dangerous but
    can still cause injury

13
Statements of Practical Treatment
  • Hazards to humans
  • Hazards to domestic animals
  • Acute effects statement (happen within 24 hours)
  • Delayed or chronic effects statement (happen over
    time such as cancer)
  • Your risk hazard from pesticide depends on the
    toxicity of the pesticide and your exposure to it

14
Hazard Statements
  • Hazards to Humans
  • Eye, skin, inhalation, ingestion, etc.
  • Environmental Hazards
  • Birds, bees, groundwater, etc.
  • Consider the hazards before you buy a pesticide.

15
First Aid (Statements of Practical Treatment)
  • Call 911 for life-threatening injuries.
  • Call Poison Control for less serious injuries.
  • 800-222-1222 from anywhere in the U.S.
  • Use First Aid on the label if help is delayed.

16
Directions for Use
  • Use sites - only use a pesticide on sites
    indicated in the labeling. Application to other
    sites is illegal and may be dangerous.
  • Use rates exceeding labeling rates or frequency
    is dangerous and illegal.
  • You may use below the labeled use rate.
  • Pests you may not use a pesticide against pests
    not listed in the labeling.
  • The pesticide may not be effective against other
    pests

17
Other Labeling Information
  • Pests controlled
  • Equipment any application equipment may be used
    unless prohibited by the labeling.
  • Mixing directions
  • Other pesticides that can be applied in
    combination
  • Potential injury or stains to plants, animals, or
    surfaces

18
The labeling directions are not advice, they are
requirements
  • It is illegal and dangerous to use a pesticide in
    any way not permitted by the labeling.

19
Weeds
20
Drift
21
Which way did he go?
22
Roundup Damage
23
Too much
24
Spill
25
Wrong Stuff
  • MSMA on Centipede

26
Where Kids Play
27
MOWER DAMAGE HEALING
28
Where were you standing?
29
Non Target Damage
30
INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (IPM)
  • IPM combines multiple pest control tactics into a
    single plan to manage pest populations and
    minimize risks to human health and the
    environment.
  • Relying on pesticides alone increases risks to
    humans/environment and the likelihood of pest
    resistance.

31
PEST IDENTIFICATION
  • The first step in pest management is correct
    identification of the pest.
  • Physical features
  • Characteristics of damage
  • Life cycle
  • Consult your local Extension office for help with
    pest identification.

32
PEST MANAGEMENT
  • Evaluate the damage or expected damage.
  • Use a control strategy that will reduce pest
    populations or damage to acceptable levels.
  • Minimize human/environmental risks.

33
MANAGEMENT GOALS
  • Prevention
  • Suppression
  • Eradication

34
MONITORING
  • What pests are present?
  • What beneficials are present?
  • Is action warranted?
  • When is the right time to begin control?
  • Were control tactics successful?

35
Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
  • Monitor pest populations/injury and determine if
    action is warranted.
  • Understand pest biology and ecology.
  • Determine pest control goals.
  • Know what control tactics are available.
  • Evaluate the benefits and risk of each tactic.
  • Choose a strategy that will be the effective and
    minimize risks.

36
PEST CONTROL FAILURES
  • Incorrect pest identification
  • Wrong pesticide
  • Incorrect timing of application
  • Incorrect placement of application
  • Pest resistance
  • New infestation

37
ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS
  • PROTECTING GROUND WATER AND ENDANGERED SPECIES

38
GROUND WATER
  • Water beneath the earths surface
  • Aquifers supply water to wells/springs
  • Pesticide contamination of aquifers is a major
    concern.

39
GROUNDWATER SOURCES
  • RAIN
  • SNOW
  • LAKES
  • STREAMS
  • IRRIGATION

40
WATER MOVEMENT
  • EVAPORATION/TRANSPIRATION
  • SURFACE RUNOFF
  • DOWNWARD INFILTRATION

41
Ground Water
Fig. 15-3 p. 308
42
No New Water
  • Existing water is the same as we have always had.
  • 97 of the earths water is salty.
  • 2 is frozen in polar caps.
  • 1 is all we have to use.
  • U.S. water systems pump 185 gallons/person per
    day.

43
Point and Non-point Sources
Fig. 22-4 p. 494
44
FACTORS DETERMINING IF PESTICIDE REACHES GROUND
WATER
  • Application practices
  • Presence of water at surface
  • Chemical characteristics of pesticide
  • Soil type
  • Geology/Location of ground water

45
APPLICATION PRACTICES
  • Never exceed labeling rates.
  • Use proper application methods.
  • Prevent back siphoning.
  • Locate storage and mix/load sites at least 100
    from surface water or links to groundwater.
  • Dispose of pesticides properly.

46
WATER PRESENT AT SURFACE
  • Rain
  • Irrigation
  • Saturated soil
  • Water and pesticides may move through the soil to
    groundwater.

47
PESTICIDE CHARACTERISTICS
  • Water solubility
  • Persistence
  • Affinity for soil particles/organic matter
  • Refer to pesticide labeling and the Material
    Safety Data Sheet for the pesticide.

48
SOIL FACTORS
  • Soil texture
  • Soil permeability
  • Soil organic mater

49
GEOLOGY
  • Distance from soil surface to water
  • Sink holes
  • Permeability

50
SOURCES OF CONTAMINATION
  • Spills
  • Improper disposal
  • Improper cleanup
  • Exceeding labeling rates

51
THINGS TO CONSIDER
  • Will the applicator understand and follow the
    pesticide labeling?
  • Are there adequate buffer zones for sensitive
    areas, crops, and other nontargets?
  • Are water sources at risk?

52
THINGS TO CONSIDER
  • Is wind calm enough to prevent drift?
  • Are nozzles, pressure, etc. adjusted to minimize
    drift?
  • Is rain imminent?
  • Do steep slopes/bare terrain increase risk of
    runoff?
  • Does the applicator understand what to do in case
    of spills or other emergencies?
  • Is the application site near a school, hospital,
    or other sensitive area?

53
THINGS TO CONSIDER
  • Are endangered species in the area?
  • Are honey bees, wildlife refuges, or parks in the
    area?
  • Are people living or working in the area?
  • Is it an area where food is processed?
  • Are domestic animals at risk?

54
PESTICIDE MOVEMENT OFF-SITE
  • Air wind, spray pressure, nozzle type
  • Water - runoff, leaching
  • Animals, equipment, clothing, or other objects
    may carry pesticides offsite.

55
PESTICIDE USE EXAMPLE
  • Client reports Fescue in Bermudagrass lawn.
  • A friend gave him some Grazon PD.
  • Client sprayed his lawn with no results.
  • What went wrong?

56
IDENTIFY THE PEST
  • FESCUE in Bermudagrass
  • SO FAR SO GOOD

57
SELECT THE RIGHT PRODUCT
  • Grazon PD is a restricted use pesticide
  • Picloram and 2,4-D
  • Clearly the wrong product for this problem.
  • It was also illegal and dangerous for his friend
    to give him this pesticide for this use.

58
Picloram
  • Controls woody, broadleaf plants
  • Binds poorly to soil.
  • Soluble in water.
  • Persistent.
  • Detected in ground water in 11 states.

59
2,4-D
  • Controls broadleaf weeds in turf
  • Slightly toxic to wildfowl
  • May be toxic to fish
  • May impair honeybee brood production
  • Low soil persistence
  • Detected in ground water in 5 states

60
(No Transcript)
61
ENDANGERED SPECIES
  • Plant or animal in danger of becoming extinct

62
FEDERAL CLASSIFICATIONS
  • Endangered
  • Threatened

63
ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT
  • US Environmental Protection Agency must ensure
    that endangered species are protected from
    pesticides.
  • Look for endangered species restrictions in the
    pesticide labeling.

64
CRITICAL HABITATS
  • Breeding areas
  • Feeding areas
  • Cover
  • Shelter
  • Space for growth

65
PESTICIDE LIMITATIONS
  • Application restricted in critical habitat of
    endangered species
  • Pesticides may harm the endangered species
    directly or indirectly.

66
CERTIFIED APPLICATORS ROLE
  • Protect endangered species.
  • Protect food for endangered species.
  • Prevent pesticide drift, runoff, and leachate
    that can contaminate food/water sources.
  • Pesticides can build up in endangered species
    that feed on plants and animals exposed to
    pesticides.

67
Pesticide Formulations
  • Pesticide active ingredients are often available
    in several different formulations.
  • Before you buy a pesticide, consider which
    formulation is best suited for your needs.

68
Advantages of Emulsifiable Concentrate
  • Easy to transport, handle and store
  • Little agitation required
  • Not abrasive
  • Does not plug screens and nozzles
  • Little visible residue

69
EC disadvantages
  • Easy to under dose or overdose due to calibration
    errors
  • May harm plants
  • Absorbed through skin
  • May deteriorate rubber and plastic
  • May pit painted surfaces
  • May be flammable or corrosive

70
Pesticide Formulated as Solutions
  • Advantages
  • Agitation not required
  • Can be used with nearly any type of sprayer
  • Disadvantages solutions more likely to move
    offsite in water

71
RTU - Ready to use
  • Advantages
  • No mixing required
  • Low concentration of active ingredient reduces
    risks
  • Easy disposal
  • Disadvantage very expensive way to purchase
    pesticide.

72
Dry Formulations
  • Dust
  • Granular
  • Wettable powder
  • Dry flowable
  • Water dispersible granules

73
Dusts
  • ADVANTAGES
  • Ready to use
  • Less likely to damage plants
  • Simple application equipment
  • DISADVANTAGES
  • May move off target
  • Do not stick to surfaces as well as liquids
  • Difficult to distribute evenly
  • May irritate eyes, nose, throat and skin

74
WPWettable Powders
  • DISADVANTAGES
  • Require constant agitation
  • Abrasive to pumps/nozzles
  • May clog nozzles
  • Leave a visible deposit
  • Inhalation risk when mixing
  • ADVANTAGES
  • Less likely to harm plants, animals and surfaces
    than EC
  • Higher concentrations of pesticide and can be
    mixed with water

75
Mixing and Loading
  • Always hold the pesticide container below face
    level when pouring
  • Wear goggles or face shield and bib top apron
    when mixing concentrated pesticides
  • Cut paper or cardboard containers open with a
    knife instead of tearing them
  • Mixing and loading operations pose the greatest
    risk of pesticide exposure

76
Empty Containers
  • Rinseable containers should be triple rinsed
  • Let the container drain into the spray tank for
    30 sec
  • Fill the container ¼ full of water
  • Upend, shake and pour rinse into the tank
  • Repeat this process
  • The container can now be disposed of at a land
    fill unless otherwise stated in the labeling

77
Pesticide Exposure
  • Oral
  • Inhalation
  • Ocular
  • Dermal

78
Pesticides in mouth or swallowed
  • Rinse mouth with water.
  • Call 911 for life-threatening conditions.
  • Call Poison Control (800-222-1222).
  • Drink large amounts of milk or water.
  • Do not give drinks to anyone that is not
    conscious
  • Do not induce vomiting unless directed by Poison
    Control or the pesticide label.
  • NEVER put pesticide in any container intended for
    food or drink

79
Inhaled Pesticide
  • Move victim to fresh air
  • Call 911 for life-threatening situations
  • Loosen tight clothing
  • Evacuate area if necessary
  • Seek medical attention

80
Pesticides in eyes
  • Remove contact lenses.
  • Rinse eyes quickly and gently with clean water 15
    minutes or more.
  • Seek medical attention.

81
Pesticide on skin
  • Rinse pesticide from skin as soon as possible
  • Call 911 for life threatening conditions
  • Keep victim warm and dry until ambulance arrives.
  • Remove PPE and wash skin with soap and water.
  • Do not apply ointments to burned areas.
  • Most skin exposures are to the hands and
    forearms. Wear gloves and long sleeve shirts.
    Wash gloves and boots before you take them off.

82
Heat Stress
  • Pesticides dont cause heat stress, but
    protective clothing may cause the body to
    overheat.
  • Heat stress symptoms include
  • Fatigue
  • Exhaustion
  • Headache, nausea
  • Dizziness, fainting
  • Severe thirst
  • Heavy sweating or no sweating
  • Confusion, slurred speech

83
First aid for heat stress
  • Call 911 for life-threatening conditions.
  • Cool victim as rapidly as possible.
  • Move victim into shade.
  • Drench victim with cool water.
  • Remove PPE.
  • Offer cool water or soft drinks.
  • NEVER force liquids on a semi-conscious or
    unconscious victim.

84
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Pesticide labeling may require
  • Long sleeve shirt
  • Long legged pants
  • Coveralls
  • Chemical resistant apron
  • Chemical resistant suit
  • Liquid proof suit
  • Water proof gloves
  • Chemical resistant gloves
  • Shoes
  • Chemical resistant foot ware
  • Chemical resistant boots
  • Chemical resistant hood
  • Wide brimmed hat
  • Protective eye wear
  • Goggles
  • Dust /mist filtering respirator
  • Cartridge respirator
  • Canister respirator
  • Self contained breathing apparatus

85
PPE
  • Water or chemical resistant rubber gloves and
    boots are best
  • Dont use cotton or other absorbent material
    gloves
  • Dont use leather footwear or tennis shoes
  • Follow the label for PPE requirements

86
Considerations
  • Does the applicator understand the pesticide
    labeling?
  • Is the applicator wearing the PPE required by the
    labeling?
  • Is the application equipment ready and safe?
  • Is the applicator prepared for emergencies?
  • Has the supervisor given proper instructions to
    the applicator?

87
Basic spill cleanup kit
  • PPE required by pesticide labeling
  • Broom
  • Shovel
  • Absorbent material e.g., cat litter
  • Buckets or heavy-duty plastic bags

88
Interacting with the Public
  • Applicators are the face of the business or
    agency.
  • Look and act professional.
  • Know the pesticide names and why they are used.
  • Wear PPE according to the labeling.
  • Be prepared for emergencies.
  • Train applicators how to respond.
  • Handouts
  • Refer to supervisor

89
Interacting with the Public
  • Never dismiss concerns.
  • Always tell the truth.
  • Dont get into an argument.
  • We only use pesticides approved for this use by
    the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the
    Georgia Department of Agriculture.
  • We always follow the label.
  • The EPA says that pesticides do not pose
    unreasonable risks if they are applied according
    to the label

90
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is
responsible for federal regulation of
pesticides. The Georgia Department of
Agriculture regulates pesticides in Georgia.
91
UGA Cooperative ExtensionGA CLEAN DAYGeorgia
Dept. of Agriculture
  • Helps farmers dispose of pesticide wastes.
  • Program is free to farmers.
  • More than 1 million pounds have been collected.
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