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Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement; Towards a Livable Community

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Title: Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement; Towards a Livable Community


1
Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement Towards a
Livable Community
  • Adewale Troutman,M.D., M.A., M.P.H.
  • Director
  • Louisville Metro Health Department

2
Epidemiology
3
Local Picture
4
Leading Causes of Death Louisville Metro, 2002
5
Leading Causes of Death in Louisville Metro by
Race, 2001
Caucasians African Americans
6
Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates Diseases of the
Heart, 2002
7
Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates Stroke, 2002
8
Percent Who Engaged in Any Leisure-time Physical
Activity During Past Month, 2004
HP 2010 Goal 80
9
Percent Who Report Eating Five or More Servings
Per Day of Fruits and/or Vegetables
10
Percent Obese, 2004 BRFSS
HP 2010 Goal 15
11
Percent Normal Weight, 2004 BRFSS
12
Percent Overweight or Obese Louisville Metro, 2004
13
Racial and Ethnic Health Inequities
14
Health Inequities in LM
  • Infant mortality rate for AAs is more than double
    the rate for Whites
  • Age-adjusted overall death rate for AAs is almost
    30 higher than Whites
  • Death rate from stroke is 44 higher for AAs than
    for Whites
  • Death rate from diseases of the heart for AAs is
    32 higher than Whites

15
Health Disparities in LM
  • AA Report having Diabetes 14
  • The incidence of new cases of AIDS reported is
    over 3 times higher for AAs
  • Homicide mortality rate is 6 times higher for AAs

16
Health Inequities Risk Factors in Louisville Metro
  • African American females had the lowest percent
    engaging in any physical activity (64)
  • African American females had the highest percent
    who were overweight or obese (74)
  • African American males had the lowest percent of
    eating 5 or more fruits and vegetables per day
    (14)
  • Disproportionate rates of Asthma, Poverty, Home
    ownership, undereducation, various cancers

17
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18
The Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement
19
The Goal of the MHHM is to create a community
wide culture that encourages and supports healthy
lifestyles by promoting increased physical
activity
( 10,000steps/day goal), optimal
nutrition, healthy public policy and increased
access to resources and facilities that bolster
the stated goal
20
Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement Objectives
  • Increase by 15 the people in Louisville Metro
    who engage in 30 minutes of moderate physical
    activity at least 5 days a week.
  • Decrease by 10 the people in Louisville Metro
    who are overweight or obese

21
Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement
  • Establish a baseline of businesses that have a
    measurable worksite wellness program
  • Increase by 15 the people in Louisville Metro
    who eat five or more servings of fruits and
    vegetables per day
  • Special focus on populations with excess
    unfavorable statistics

22
Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement Phase One
  • Move It, Louisville
  • Take Charge Challenge

23
Phase Two
  • Lose it Louisville

24
Components
  • Umbrella Advisory Council
  • Staffing
  • Ongoing BRFSS
  • TCC
  • Minigrant Program
  • Social Marketing
  • Web access
  • Fitness Roundtable

25
Advisory Council
26
Advisory Council
  • Umbrella body to serve as a unifying group
  • Removal of competition
  • Bring together those with initiatives in place or
    being planned
  • Multidisciplinary composition
  • Corporate
  • Education
  • Government
  • NGOs

27
Advisory Council ( cont )
  • U of L
  • JCPS
  • AHA
  • WHAS
  • JCMS
  • GE
  • Ford/UAW
  • Heuser Clinic
  • Metro YMCA
  • Urban League
  • 100 Black Men of Louisville

28
Advisory Council ( cont )
  • Health Promotion Schools of Excellence
  • Bi monthly meeting
  • Evolution into coalition
  • Coordinating council for all physical activity
    events, projects and programs
  • Now over 150 Organizations , Agencies Businesses

29
Worksite Wellness Take Charge Challenge
30
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31
Take Charge Challenge
  • Worksite wellness initiative
  • Low cost
  • Single focus
  • Individual goal setting
  • Activity points 1 point10 minutes
  • Increasing physical activity
  • Stages of Change
  • Teams
  • Coordinators
  • Incentives
  • Kick off
  • Mayor as the leader

32
Take Charge Challenge Stages of Activity (
Readiness for Change )
Stage 1 I dont exercise or walk regularly now,
and I dont plan to start in the near
future Stage 2 I dont exercise or walk
regularly, but Ive been thinking about
starting Stage 3 I am trying to start to
exercise or walk, or I exercise or walk
infrequently Stage 4 Im doing moderate
physical activity fewer than 5 times a week, or
vigorous activity fewer than 3 times a
week Stage 5 Ive been doing 30 minutes of
moderate physical activity 5 or more times a
week, or 20 minutes of vigorous activity at least
3 times a week, for the last 1 to 6 months Stage
6 Ive been doing 30 minutes of moderate
physical activity 5 or more times a week, or 20
minutes of vigorous activity at least 3 times a
week, for 7 months or longer
33
Physical Activity Minigrants
34
Activity Minigrants
  • Involvement of community based organizations
  • 80,000
  • Neighborhood place areas
  • Grants of 2000
  • Programmatic activities designed to increase
    levels pf physical activity at local level

35
Social Marketing
36
Social Marketing
  • Culture change
  • Branding, logo and tag line
  • Image placement
  • Media buy in
  • Lets tie it all together

37
Joint GLI and MHHM awards for worksite wellness
initiatives
38
Ongoing Activities
  • Bike Summit
  • Hike and Bike Events
  • Kellogg grant to assist in implementing school
    wellness policies
  • Establishment of speakers bureau
  • Tai Chi program
  • Healthy Hometown Resource Guide
  • Healthy hometown Tip posters
  • Healthy Hometown Eats
  • Faith walk

39
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40
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41
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42
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43
Evaluation
  • Initial evaluation will be conducted through the
    use of the Metro BRFSS which is an ongoing
    community survey designed to look at modifiable
    risk factors .Further, with the assistance of
    council members and academic partners, additional
    evaluative measures will be developed and
    implemented.

44
Youth Physical Activity
45
The Tommie Smith Youth Track Initiative is an
initiative under the
46
The Track Meet More than 300 youth ages 5 to 18
participated
47
OPENING CEREMONies Parade of Athletes
48
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49
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50
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51
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52
Center for Health Equity Mission
  • Recognizing that traditional public health
    practices have value but cannot succeed by
    themselves, the Center for Health Equity (CHE)
    was established to address the social and
    economic conditions that impact the civic
    wellbeing of Louisville residents causing health
    inequities.
  • The Center serves as a catalyst for collaboration
    between public health, communities and
    organizations that work to eliminate the social
    and economic barriers to good health.
  • Through policy change, evidence-based
    interventions, and education the Center builds
    new coalitions that reshape the public health
    landscape to assist communities in addressing
    barriers to health equity based upon social and
    economic conditions.

53
The Center for Health Equity
Civic Capacity The ability of a community or any
system to mobilize both horizontally and
vertically the sectors needed to realize a common
vision using the principles of community
organizing.
Education Training
Structural Determinants
Online Reading Series
Health Equity Hearings
Civic Capacity Building
Framing Research
Community Organizing
Practitioners Training
Kellogg Dialogue
Equity Grants
Socioeconomic Policies
Built Environment
Program Equity Audits
Community Organizing Training
Equity Grants Grants are made available for the
purpose of building civic capacity to engage in
policymaking to impact social and economic issues.
Communication Campaign
Speakers Series
CBPR
Health Impact Assessment
54
The Built Environment
55
ACTIVE Louisville
  • ACTIVE Louisville is a Robert Wood Johnson
    Foundation program designed to establish and
    evaluate innovative approaches that promote
    physical activity and health.
  • The initiative focuses on the Clarksdale HOPE VI
    Revitalization area, Phoenix Hill, Smoketown, and
    Shelby Park neighborhoods.
  • ACTIVE Louisville collaborates with community
    partners to influence community planning, policy
    and physical development.

56
Complete Streets
  • Louisville is developing a comprehensive complete
    streets Policy and Design Manual.
  • The policy will require that, whenever possible,
    all new, resurfaced, and reconstructed roadways
    incorporate facilities for all users including
    pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, and
    people with disabilities.
  • The manual will also include specific design
    guidelines.

57
Center for Health Equity
  • Center for Health Equity has developed the Built
    Environment Assessment Tool (BEAT).
  • BEAT is a community-driven effort to increase
    access to physical activity and healthy foods by
    improving the built environment.
  • The BEAT tool will identify the unique structural
    assets, challenges and opportunities that promote
    or prevent physical activity in communities.

58
Mayors Miles
  • The Mayors Mile Program allows citizens to
    calculate their mileage along Metro Park trails
    by counting the number of green dots 10 dots
    equals one Mile.
  • Streets, city sidewalks, neighborhoods, and
    shopping areas are the most immediately
    accessible recreation facility for most
    Louisvillians.
  • The expanded Mayors Miles program will connect
    destinations Louisvillians frequent in their
    daily routine and help them reach their
    prescribed fitness goals.
  • The goal of the program is to stimulate the
    growth of a network of walkable, connected
    communities across Louisville.

59
Pedestrian Summit Goals
  • Create a master plan for promoting and supporting
    pedestrian activity.
  • Identify barriers to walkability.
  • Promote understanding and educational benefits of
    walkable communities.
  • Integrate pedestrian amenities and improvements
    into existing planning and development efforts.
  • Bring positive energy and motivation to
    neighborhoods as they develop plans.

60
Pedestrian Summit
  • Mark Fenton, national expert and walking
    advocate, will be the keynote speaker
  • The summit will occur in September 2007
  • Partners include the Local Transit Authority,
    Public Works, ACTIVE Louisville (Active Living by
    Design), Planning Design, University of
    Louisville, and Parks

61
Adewale Troutman,M.D., M.A., M.P.H. Director Louis
ville Metro Department of Public Health and
Wellness adewale.troutman_at_louisvilleky.gov
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