MEETING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN THE RESIDENCE HALLS: GUIDING OUR PRACTICE WITH UNIVERSAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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MEETING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN THE RESIDENCE HALLS: GUIDING OUR PRACTICE WITH UNIVERSAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN

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Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990/ Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008. Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: MEETING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN THE RESIDENCE HALLS: GUIDING OUR PRACTICE WITH UNIVERSAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN


1
MEETING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
IN THE RESIDENCE HALLS GUIDING OUR PRACTICE
WITH UNIVERSAL INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN
  • Megan Hawley, Andrew McGeehan and Paige Gardner
    Seattle University

2
Background Knowledge
3
Empowering our students
  • In 2008, 11 of all postsecondary students
    reported having a disability.
  • From 2000-2008, reports of ADD increased from
    7-19 percent.
  • Twenty-four percent of students with disabilities
    reported having mental, emotional or psychiatric
    conditions.
  • The average age of students with disabilities has
    become more consistent with the average age of
    students without disabilities.
  • Students without disabilities average age 25
    (2000-2008).
  • Students with disabilities average age 30
    (2000).
  • Students with disabilities average age 26
    (2008).

Information gathered from the 2009 GAO report to
the Chairman, Committee on Education and Labor,
House of Representatives. Higher Education and
Disability Education Needs a Coordinated
Approach to Improve Its Assistance to schools in
Supporting Students.
4
Common Issues
  • Unaware of their rights and responsibilities.
  • School faculty and staff lack awareness of
    support needed for students with disabilities.
  • School faculty and staff lack education on the
    legal requirements for students with
    disabilities.
  • Students with disabilities tend to attend
    community colleges and two year colleges
    possibly due to smaller class sizes, personalized
    attention, and specialized services.

5
Legal Basics
  • Higher Education Act of 1965/ Higher Education
    Opportunity Act.
  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
  • Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990/
    Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of
    2008.
  • Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of
    2008.
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

6
Universal Instructional Design
  • UID began as an architectural philosophy, a way
    of addressing the societal demands to improve
    accessibility to those with disabilities.
  • UID demands that when designing, the creator will
    consider the needs of all potential users.
  • Often referred to as creating curb cuts, UID
    hopes to make education more accessible to all
    students not just those with disabilities.
  • UID does not emphasize one size fits all but
    instead seeks to provide access to all people.

7
Universal Instructional Design
  • Guiding Principles
  • Create welcoming atmosphere
  • Determine essential components
  • Communicate clear expectations
  • Provide constructive feedback
  • Explore the use of natural supports for learning
  • Design methods that consider diverse styles, ways
    of knowing and abilities.
  • Allow for multiple ways of demonstrating
    knowledge
  • Promote interaction between students, faculty and
    staff

8
UD and UID
  • Concepts/ models that developed to address the
    needs of students with disabilities.
  • Closely related and supportive of each other.
  • Readings
  • Universal Design for Learning (UDL Center for
    Applied Special Technology, n.d. Rose, 2001
    Rose Meyer, 2000).
  • Universal Design for Instruction (UDI Scott,
    McGuire Shaw, 2001, 2003).
  • Universal Instructional Design (UID Silver,
    Bourke Strehorn, 1998).

9
Best Practices
10
Accommodation Approach
  • Access is a problem for the individual and should
    be addressed by that person and the disability
    service program.
  • Access is achieved through accommodations and/or
    retrofitting existing requirements.
  • Access is retroactive.
  • Access is often provided in a separate location
    or through special treatment.
  • Access must be reconsidered each time a new
    individual uses the system, i.e. is consumable.

11
Universal Design Approach
  • Access issues stem from an inaccessible, poorly
    designed environments and should be addressed by
    the designer.
  • The system/environment is designed, to the
    greatest extent possible, to be usable by all.
  • Access is proactive.
  • Access is inclusive.
  • Access, as part of the environmental design, is
    sustainable.

12
PASS IT Program
  • University of Minnesota
  • Pedagogy and Student Services for Institutional
    Transformation Project.
  • Funded by the US Department of Education.
  • Seeks to provide professional development for
    faculty, staff and administrators, particularly
    those not directly involved in disability
    services.
  • Using a Train the Trainer format, facilitators
    work to increase knowledge and materials related
    to UID/ UD.

13
Unlimited Time and Funding
  • New Construction
  • Wide hallways
  • Accessible restrooms/ showers
  • Adjustable furniture
  • Bedroom Areas

14
Limited Time and Funding
  • Front Loading washers
  • Learning Community development
  • Entry areas/ doors
  • Training for RA and professional staff
  • Audio/ Visual fire alarm boxes

15
Immediate Action
  • Website font size/ auditory option
  • Information in multiple formats (Braille,
    aurally, other languages)
  • Assistive listening devices
  • Provide programming assistance (location, time,
    interpreters)

16
Discussion
17
Group Discussions
  • Table groups.
  • Create an ideal campus.
  • Where do students with disabilities fit in?
  • When you get back to your campus, how can you
    incorporate Universal Design?
  • What does Universal Design mean to you? How would
    your campus react to implementing UID?
  • Has your campus been implementing UID
    inadvertently?

18
Resources
  • Dion, B. (2006). International best practices in
    universal design A global review. Canadian Human
    Rights Commission. Ottawa Government of Canada.
  • United States Government Accountability Office.
    (2009).Higher Education and Disability Education
    Needs a Coordinated Approach to Improve its
    Assistance to Schools in Supporting Students.
    (GAO-10-33). Washington, DC U.S.
  • Higbee, Jeanne L., Goff, Emily (Eds.). (2008).
    Pedagogy and Student Services for Institutional
    Transformation Implementing Universal Design in
    Higher Education. Minneapolis, MN University of
    Minnesota, Center for Research on Developmental
    Education and Urban Literacy.

19
Questions?
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