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Active Learning Strategies

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Active Learning Strategies for Large Classrooms 5/06 2 Assumptions about Active Learning Student engagement deepens student understanding. Choice of strategies ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Active Learning Strategies


1
Active Learning Strategies
  • for
  • Large Classrooms
  • 5/06

2
You have been asked to teach a course this fall
with over 80 students. Your philosophy of
teaching supports active learning but how can
this many students actively participate ?
Furthermore, classrooms on campus large enough to
accommodate this many students, have immovable
chairs. How can you foster active
learning among your students with these
constraints?
www.bath.ac.uk/.../ picasso/cubist_charles.jpg
3

4
2 Assumptions about Active Learning
  • Student engagement deepens student understanding.
  • Choice of strategies depends on
  • Course level student learning outcomes
  • Instructor teaching style

5
Preplanning
  • What student learning outcomes do you want to
    achieve?
  • What knowledge or skills will be learned?
  • How much time will you dedicate to this
    strategy?
  • How will you measure its effectiveness?

6
It is tradition, It was part of my training, and
seems like what I should be doing. I feel somehow
guilty when I am not lecturing. (Creed as
cited in Bonwell Eison, 1991 )
7

Continuum of Active Learning Strategies
Cooperative learning groups
Punctuated Lecture
  • Complex Strategies
  • Longer in duration
  • 1

Mid Level Strategies 2
  • Simpler Strategies
  • Short
  • Unstructured
  • 4

Adapted from Sutherland, Bonwell (1996)
8
1. Active Pause in the Lecture
lecture 12-18 min
lecture 12-18min
lecture 12-18 min
2 min. pause
2 min. pause
2 min. pause
Ruhl, Hughes Schloss, 1987
9
Sampling of simple active learning strategies
  • An active pause in the lecture
  • Think-Pair-Share
  • One Minute Paper
  • Formative Quizzes

Adapted from Sutherland Bonwell (1996)
10
2 Minute Pause
  • No interaction between student faculty
  • Discussions among students
  • Rework notes
  • Clarifying
  • Assimilating information

11
Study findings
  • 12 days after the last lecture, long term
    retention tested.
  • Students hearing lectures where the instructor
    paused did significantly better on the free
    recall quizzes and a comprehensive test.
  • Ruhl, Hughes Schloss, 1987

12
2. Think-Ink-Pair-Share (5-10 min) TIPS
  • Pose a question during the lecture
  • Student thinks about/writes an answer
  • makes an attempt to answer.
  • Then, collaborates with another student.
  • Answer clarified, expanded
  • Answer shared with class
  • An extension is to have 2 pairs join and compare
    answers.

13
Take half a minute to think about simple active
learning strategies you have utilized in a
course.
  • Then, share them with your neighbor

14
3. One Minute Paper (in reality 4-5min.)
  • The major points I learned today are.
  • Similarities and differences between the lecture
    and their reading
  • Describe the concept of
  • Questions that remain unanswered or the muddiest
    points are..
  • (Angelo Cross 1993)

15
Discipline Specific Questions Might Include
  • Chemistry- What is yet unclear about a particular
    chemical process?
  • Literature- What was the most meaningful insight
    you gained from this chapter. What important
    question did the novel make you ask of yourself?

16
Have you used minute papers in your courses?
  1. Yes
  2. No

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17
If so, how effectively did they deepen student
learning?
  1. Very effectively
  2. So, so
  3. Not so much

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18
4. Formative Quizzes i.e. ungraded
  • To understand how well students are
    comprehending
  • Same type of questions that might appear on an
    exam are read or shown on an overhead.
  • If multiple choice or T/F students can
  • Use hand signals (polling)
  • Use cards if you want answers to be more
    confidential

A
B
19
Advantages of Formative QuizzesQuickly
determine student understanding. Do you agree?
  1. Yes
  2. No

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20
Advantages of Formative QuizzesOpportunity for
clarification before new material introduced. Do
you agree?
  1. Yes
  2. No

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61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
21
Advantages for studentsHave an idea of types of
questions on an exam. Whats your opinion?
  1. Strongly Agree
  2. Agree
  3. Disagree
  4. Strongly Disagree

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22
Advantages for studentsShow students areas that
need more study. Do you agree?
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. Abstain

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23
Mid-Level Active learning Strategies
  • When utilizing films, demonstrations, guest
    speakers etc.
  • Book Ends
  • Double Entry Journal

24
1. Book Ends
Professor leads Discussion with all Students
in the class Summarizes Key points
For 5 In small groups, Students work on a
specific problem or question related to lecture
content
Short Lecture 10-15
Yuretich, Khan, Leckie, and Clement (2001)
25
Double Entry Journal
  • When students can place content knowledge in a
    personal context, they are more likely to retain
    the information and be able to retrieve it.
  • Barbara Mills, 2002, p.2

26
Double Entry Journal
Key Points Response
Key points of an article, film, chapter, guest lecture. Can be written by faculty or by student. Students respond out of class, linking the point to other academic material, current events, or personal experiences opinions

Adapted from Barbara Mills (2002)
27
Viterbo University School of Nursing N-451 Double
Entry Journal-Transcultural Nursing Name__________
_____________________________
Key Points What is cultural competence? Population Specific Issues Socioeconomic 2.Epidemiological 3.Outcome Resources www.crossculture.com http//erc.msh.org www.ethnomed.org Responses
28
Complex Strategies
  • Cooperative Groups

29
Cooperative Groups Encourage
  • All students learn the material.
  • Weaker students request receive peer coaching.
  • Shyer or less able students accept leadership
    roles.
  • Barbara Mills, 2002

30
Considerations working with Cooperative Groups
  • Peer and Self Assessment
  • Team member name_________________
  • Your name_________________________
  • Expectation Possible points (10 total)
  • 1. Present and on time
    1 2
  • 2. Own work completed
    1 2 3
  • 3. Actively participates in the team process 1
    2 3
  • 4. Respectful of team members
    1 2

31
Considerations contd
  • 3-4 Students/Group
  • Explicit instructions
  • Time frame communicated
  • Group roles identified
  • Facilitator- takes leadership and keeps the
    group focused and on track.
  • Recorder- responsible for writing the group
    responses.
  • Spokesperson- reports to the whole class as the
    opportunity is presented.
  • Folder manager-makes sure all materials are
    completed and turns in folder at the end the
    class

32
Considerations working with Cooperative Groups
  • Teacher selected vs randomly or student selected
  • Remain together long enough to bond

33
Opportunities for the teacher
  • Monitor group learning by moving group to group.
  • Show interest in students progress
  • Being perceived as approachable

34
You have been asked to teach a course this fall
with over 80 students. Your philosophy of
teaching supports active learning but how can
this many students actively participate ?
Furthermore, classrooms on campus large enough to
accommodate this many students, have immovable
chairs. How can you foster active
learning among your students with these
constraints?
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