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Public Health Reports Meet the Author! Live Webcast

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Title: Public Health Reports Meet the Author! Live Webcast


1
Public Health Reports Meet the Author! Live
Webcast
Are We Prepared? Lessons Learned from the Last
Decade of Preparedness Education and a Look to
the Future Speakers Edward Baker, MD, MPH, Jack
Thompson, MSW, and Bernard Turnock, MD, MPH Guest
Editors of the Nov/Dec 2010 PHR Special
Supplement on Public Health Preparedness
  • Tuesday, February 1, 2011 100-215 PM (EST)
  • To join the conference call, dial
  • 1-866-951-1151
  • Access Code 8768832

2
Public Health Reports Meet the Author! Live
Webcast
Are We Prepared? Lessons Learned from the Last
Decade of Preparedness Education and a Look to
the Future
Jack Thompson, MSW
Bernard Turnock, MD, MPH
Edward Baker, MD, MPH
3
Disclaimer
  • The views and interpretations presented in this
    webcast are those of the speakers and do not
    necessarily represent the official position of
    the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
    the University of Washington School of Public
    Health, the University of North Carolina at
    Chapel Hill Gillings School of Public Health, the
    University of Illinois at Chicago School of
    Public Health or the Association of Schools of
    Public Health.

4
Learning Objectives
  • Describe the areas of preparedness education that
    were addressed by the Centers for Public Health
    Preparedness program, as described in the
    supplement.
  • Explain important lessons learned from the
    Centers for Public Health Preparedness program
    that can be applied to future preparedness
    training efforts.
  • Discuss ways that academia and practice partners
    can collaborate to improve the preparedness of
    the public health workforce.

5
HISTORY Origins of Center for Public Health
Preparedness (CPHP) Program
  • Original vision (developed in partnership with
    ASPH) was to create a funding stream to support
    delivery of practice-relevant training through
    schools of public health
  • The emphasis on preparedness training emerged as
    the nation became more aware of need for public
    health preparedness

6
HISTORY Models for CPHP program
  • CPHP program was designed to emulate other
    successful CDC-SPH partnerships
  • NIOSH Education and Research Centers
  • Prevention Research Centers
  • Injury Prevention Centers

7
HISTORY Initial strategies of CPHP Program
  • Strategy for growth of CPHP network
  • Competitive identification of first 4 Centers
  • Advocacy through ASPH to fund approved but
    unfunded centers
  • Annual convening of Centers to share lessons
    learned and assess impact
  • Initial goal one CPHP in every SPH funded at 1
    M per year

8
ACHIEVEMENTS The development of a national network
  • In 2000, four centers with a collective 1.7
    million budget
  • By 2003, 21 centers and 23.8 million
  • By mid-decade, 27 CPHPs shared more than 27
    million

9
CPHP Network and Map
  • University of Alabama Birmingham
  • University of Albany SUNY
  • University of Arizona
  • University of California, Berkeley
  • University of California, Los Angeles
  • University of Illinois at Chicago
  • University of Iowa
  • University of Medicine and Dentistry
  • of New Jersey
  • University of Michigan
  • University of Minnesota
  • University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  • University of Oklahoma
  • University of Pittsburgh
  • University of South Carolina
  • University of South Florida
  • University of Texas
  • University of Washington
  • Yale University
  • Columbia University
  • Emory University
  • Harvard University
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Loma Linda University
  • Ohio State University
  • Saint Louis University
  • Texas AM University
  • Tulane University

10
Public Health Reports Special Supplement Public
Health Preparedness
11
Topics from the Special Supplement
  • Evidence Base for Preparedness Training
  • Preparedness Training Programs
  • Graduate Student Epidemiology Response Programs
  • Preparedness Law
  • Pandemic Influenza Planning
  • Exercise Planning Evaluation
  • Regional Pediatric Disaster Surge

12
ACHIEVEMENTS The rapid expansion of substantive
preparedness materials and activities
  • Public health preparedness trainings in person,
  • web-based, webcasts and other modes
  • Expansion of preparedness in public health
    education
  • Innovative collaborations between academia and
    public health practice
  • Advancement of new technologies

13
ACHIEVEMENTS Enhancement of public health
preparedness core competencies
  • Core competency frameworks previously developed
    for public health workers supplemented with
    competencies for emergency preparedness and
    response, epidemiology, informatics and other
    public health specializations

14
ACHIEVEMENTS Expansion of education and training
programs
  • Competency frameworks for needs assessments
    developed and utilized
  • Trainings took advantage of new information and
    communication technologies
  • Schools of public health offered new degrees,
    academic certificate programs, student
    epidemiology response teams, and courses related
    to public health emergency preparedness
  • New partnerships developed

15
ACHIEVEMENTS Return on investment outcomes of
the 2004 CDC impact assessment
  • Strong, sustained partnerships with the public
    health frontline
  • Capacity building and strengthening in state and
    local public health agencies
  • Improved capacity of schools of public health to
    respond to the needs of the public health
    workforce, including multiple training modes
  • Directed applied research that benchmarked
    learner performance and filled critical workforce
    development research gaps

16
ACHIEVEMENTS Summary of impacts
  • Training materials and multiple modalities
    available for workforce
  • Substantive partnerships established with state,
    local and tribal public health
  • Set the stage for the practice-based research
    that will drive the next phases of the
    preparedness activity within schools of public
    health

17
LESSONS LEARNED National level
  • Importance of credibility with practice partners
  • Importance of national network of centers
  • Importance of elevating the prominence of
    practice within schools of public health

18
LESSONS LEARNED Some cautionary lessons
national level
  • A strengthened science base for practice was
    needed and not likely to emerge from the emphasis
    we placed on just-in-time and on the ground
    partnerships (the PERRCs may better fill this
    role)
  • The need for the science base may also be met by
    the new PERLCs, with their emphasis on
    development of training based on nationally
    established competencies
  • Need to document what doesnt work if we are to
    develop the evidence base

19
LESSONS LEARNED Critical success factors center
level
  • Strong leadership
  • Strong relationships with state and local
    partners
  • Services determined by needs of practice partners
  • Strong emphasis on highest quality products
  • Innovative use of technology
  • Training Website
  • Distance Based Course Delivery
  • Ready to Use Training Packages
  • Research and service linked

20
LESSONS LEARNED Critical success factors center
level
  • Dedicated professional staff
  • Diversified funding support
  • CDC grant provides core support
  • Contracts with state and local health departments
  • Other support (CDC, CSTE, PAHO, etc)
  • Close working relationships within SPH and other
    university colleges (medicine, business)

21
OPPORTUNITIES PERLC Program Unique Opportunities
  • Opportunity knocks but twice for Preparedness
    Centers
  • PERLCs Law For every opportunity, there is an
    equal and opposite re-opportunity
  • Every opportunity is a challenge in disguise (and
    vice versa)

22
OPPORTUNITIES PERLC Program Unique Opportunities
  • Part of largest public health workforce
    development initiative
  • Much to build on from first decade
  • Student Epi Response Teams
  • Technologic Tools
  • Competencies Linked to Organizational Capacity
  • Exercise planning and evaluation
  • Retooled game plan
  • Clear performance focus from the outset
  • Target audience identified, training ends defined
  • Collaborations across centers now focus on
    getting the work done, rather than building a
    foundation

23
OPPORTUNITIES PERLC Program Challenges
  • Sustaining partnerships
  • Influencing workforce development
  • PERLC-PERRC synergies
  • Research and evaluation too important to be left
    to the researchers and evaluators

24
Public Health Reports Special Supplement Public
Health Preparedness
  • What story will be told in the 2020 special
    supplement?

25
OPPORTUNITIES Opportunity Knocks But Twice?
  • Special program despite uncertainties
  • What will 2020 Supplement tell us?
  • Ducks on the pond

26
Public Health Reports Meet the Author! Live
Webcast
Are We Prepared? Lessons Learned from the Last
Decade of Preparedness Education and a Look to
the Future
Jack Thompson, MSW
Bernard Turnock, MD, MPH
Edward Baker, MD, MPH
27
Public Health Reports Meet the Author! Live
Webcast
  • Stay tuned for our next webcast!
  • www.publichealthreports.org

Certification in Public Health Continuing
Education Practice, please go to http//www.shopp
ublichealth.org/ Link to the CE credits is on the
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