This document is contained within the Visitor Use Management Toolbox on Wilderness.net. Since other related resources found in this toolbox may be of interest, you can visit this toolbox by visiting the following URL: - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – This document is contained within the Visitor Use Management Toolbox on Wilderness.net. Since other related resources found in this toolbox may be of interest, you can visit this toolbox by visiting the following URL: PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 5808b7-N2ZmY



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

This document is contained within the Visitor Use Management Toolbox on Wilderness.net. Since other related resources found in this toolbox may be of interest, you can visit this toolbox by visiting the following URL:

Description:

... & cement surfacing Construct Resistant Trails Geotextiles Construct Trails to Reduce Impacts Geotextiles Construct Trails to Reduce Impacts Maintain Trails to ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:74
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 32
Provided by: jeffm170
Learn more at: http://www.wilderness.net
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: This document is contained within the Visitor Use Management Toolbox on Wilderness.net. Since other related resources found in this toolbox may be of interest, you can visit this toolbox by visiting the following URL:


1
  • This document is contained within the Visitor Use
    Management Toolbox on Wilderness.net. Since other
    related resources found in this toolbox may be of
    interest, you can visit this toolbox by visiting
    the following URL http//www.wilderness.net/index
    .cfm?fusetoolboxessecvum. All toolboxes are
    products of the Arthur Carhart National
    Wilderness Training Center.

2
Trail Design, Construction, Management

Jeff Marion, Unit Leader/Scientist Virginia Tech
Field Unit, USGS, Patuxent WRC jmarion_at_vt.edu,
540-231-6603
3
Presentation Objectives
  • Present a trail system assessment process for
    evaluating the sustainability of existing trails.
  • Describe trail design and management strategies,
    including
  • Selecting resistant alignments
  • Constructing resistant trails
  • Describe trail management strategies, including
  • Maintaining trails to reduce impacts
  • Managing visitors to reduce impact

4
Trail System Assessment
Definition Identify trails that have a high
physical potential for sustainable use (i.e.,
appropriate soils, hydrology, and vegetation),
and also contribute to the overall recreation and
transportation needs of the entire protected
area. Requires initial identification of
potential trails and further site-specific
evaluation of trail conditions by trained
personnel. Purpose To provide a
decision-making framework for selecting a trail
system that is compatible with the landscape and
provides recreation opportunities that fit within
the stated agency mission.
5
Trail System Assessment Summary
Administrative Public Roads
Field assessment of trail suitability
Connecting Destination Trails
Core Road Trail System
Optimal Trail System
Recreational Trails
Identify trails with poor soil, vegetation, and
topographic characteristics and/or conflicting
uses
Eliminate and/or identify alternative alignment
for problem trails
Trails used for Admin. Resource Management
Purposes
6
Trail Design and Management Strategies
  • Select resistant alignments most important
    factor (trail alignment relative to topography,
    resistant soils)
  • Construct resistant trails
  • Maintain trails to reduce impacts
  • Manage visitors to reduce impacts

7
Resistant Alignments
Trail Alignment Angle to the Prevailing Slope
Low Alignment angle
High Alignment angle
8
Trail Alignment Angles
0-22 degrees Impossible to drain water, will erode except on low trail grades
23-45 degrees Poor difficult to drain water, will erode on steep trail grades
46-67 degrees Good easy to drain water while still gaining elevation
68-90 degrees Excellent - easy to drain water, trail doesnt gain elevation very fast
9
Trail Profiles with Different Topographic
Positions and Trail Alignment Angles
Upper Slope
Upper Slope
Mid-slope
Lower Slope
10
Trail Grade
Trail Grade Remarks Drainage Spacing
0-2 Avoid difficult to drain Not possible
3-6 Ideal for general uses 500 ft
7-10 OK in places if maintained 300 ft
11-15 OK for short segments if well-maintained or in rocky soils 100
gt15 Avoid unless steps are constructed lt50
Horse Motorized Use Trails Grades should not
exceed 10 due to their higher potential for
erosion. Gravel is also recommended unless soils
are rocky.
11
Construct Resistant Trails
Side-hill trails, outsloped treads
12
Construct Resistant Trails
Crossing wet terrain
13
Construct Resistant Trails
Tread design
Rolling Grade Dip
14
Construct Resistant Trails
Wood surfacing
15
Gravel Surfacing
16
Construct Resistant Trails
Rock surfacing
17
Construct Resistant Trails
Rot resistant wood
18
Construct Resistant Trails
Gravel, concrete block, cement surfacing
19
Construct Trails to Reduce Impacts
Geotextiles
20
Construct Trails to Reduce Impacts
Geotextiles
21
Maintain Trails to Reduce Impacts
Relocations Needed
22
Maintain Trails to Reduce Impacts
Relocations Needed
23
Maintain Trails to Reduce Impacts
Maintenance Features Stream Crossing Impacts
24
Maintain Trails to Reduce Impacts
Maintenance Features Stream Crossing Solutions
25
Maintenance Features Stream Crossing Solutions
26
Maintenance Features Stream Crossing Solutions
27
Maintain Trails to Reduce Impacts
Graveling
28
Maintain Trails to Reduce Impacts
Tread Drainage
29
Manage Visitors to Reduce Impacts
  • Educate Visitors
  • Regulate Visitors

30
Leave No Trace Travel and Camp on Durable
Surfaces
  • Stay on formal trails when possible, walk single
    file in the center of the tread. Dont create
    new trails.

31
Visitor Regulations
Regulate the Type, Amount, Behavior of
Visitation
About PowerShow.com