Coaching on a Shoestring: Evolution of the Coaching Model in Maryland - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Coaching on a Shoestring: Evolution of the Coaching Model in Maryland PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 567899-Mzg5Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Coaching on a Shoestring: Evolution of the Coaching Model in Maryland

Description:

Coaching on a Shoestring: Evolution of the Coaching Model in Maryland Elsa Velez Joan Ledvina Parr Charles County Public Schools ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:76
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 41
Provided by: jpa9
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Coaching on a Shoestring: Evolution of the Coaching Model in Maryland


1
Coaching on a ShoestringEvolution of the
Coaching Model in Maryland
  • Elsa Velez
    Joan Ledvina Parr
  • Charles County Public Schools
    Baltimore County Public Schools
  • Virginia Dolan
    Susan Barrett
  • Anne Arundel County Public Schools
    Sheppard Pratt Health System
  • International Conference on Positive Behavior
    Support
  • Boston, MA.
  • March 8, 2007

2
Outcomes
  • Gain knowledge about coaching
  • Acquire tips for effective coaching
  • Learn strategies to enhance coaching efficiency

www.pbismaryland.org
Coaching in Maryland Building a Plane in Flight
3
Pennsylvania
West Virginia
Delaware
D.C.
Virginia
4
Maryland PBIS Partnership and Collaboration
5
History of PBIS in Maryland
  • 1998 Collaboration
  • MSDE and Sheppard Pratt Health System
  • 1999 Tough Kids Tough Times Forum
  • 15 schools trained statewide
  • Upon follow up it was learned very few of these
    schools felt successful implementing PBIS
  • Train and Hope model vs. Supportive Consultation
    Model

6
History of PBIS in Maryland and Schools Trained
in PBIS
  • Maryland Summer Institute
  • in 2000, 20 schools trained
  • in 2001, 30 schools trained
  • Project Target and Johns Hopkins University join
    the collaboration with MSDE and SEPH, 2002

7
History of PBIS in Maryland and Schools Trained
in PBIS
  • Maryland Summer Institute
  • in 2002, 54 schools trained
  • in 2003, 60 schools trained
  • in 2004, 85 schools trained
  • in 2005, 94 schools trained
  • in 2006, 118 schools trained

8
Number of Maryland School Teams and Behavior
Support Coaches Trained by Year
9
Number of Maryland School Teams Trained and
Number Remaining Active
10
Percentage of PBIS Schools Trained and Remaining
Active
CoachesStructured Training beginning 2002
Coaches limited training 2000 and 2001
No coaches 1999
11
Who are the Maryland Coaches?
  • Employee of the school system
  • Preferably are school psychologists, social
    workers, counselors, administrators, behavior
    interventionists, special education resource
    teacher, etc.
  • May be school based or itinerant

12
What are the Responsibilities of a Coach?
  • Consistently attend PBIS team meetings
  • Assist team with data-based decision-making,
    planning, and implementation
  • Attend Regional/State Coaches meetings/trainings
  • Send information to PBIS State/District
    Coordinator (e.g., checklists, action plans,
    etc.)
  • Assist with dissemination activities (e.g.,
    presentations, case studies, articles, etc.)

13
Coaches Have.
  • Fluency with PBIS systems, practices, and data
  • Knowledge of behavior management strategies
  • Knowledge of PBIS technical assistance, such as
    data management systems (SWIS)
  • Capacity to train others in PBIS practices and
    systems (i.e., mentoring)
  • Enthusiasm to sustain school PBIS implementation
    efforts

14
Type of Coaching
  • Internal Coach
  • Individuals who are full time staff member of the
    school they coach
  • External Coach
  • Individuals who are itinerant staff members
    coaching one of the schools to which they are
    assigned
  • Individuals who are coaching another school
    (i.e., not their assigned position)

15
Considerations of Internal vs. External Coaching
  • School Size
  • Geographic Spread between Schools
  • District Capacity/Investment in Systemic
    Implementation
  • Personnel Skill Fluency
  • Organizational Structures and Capacity
  • Coaching Coordination

16
Advantages
  • Internal Coach
  • Knowledge of staffing, operational procedures,
    organization, etc.
  • Established staff relationships
  • Regular access
  • External Coach
  • Independent relationship with staff
  • Outside perspective and examples
  • Multiple school access

17
Disadvantages
  • Internal Coach
  • Conflicting role responsibilities, lines of
    authority, and supervisory functions
  • Narrow range of external authority, experience,
    and examples
  • External Coach
  • Limited knowledge of staffing, operational
    procedures, organization, etc.
  • Limited working relationships
  • Less frequent access

18
What Do Coaches Do?
  • Communicate with team (phone calls, emails,
    attend team meetings)
  • Ensure that team has agenda, data, team
    implementation checklist-Form A, action plan)
  • Ensure team communicates to staff (Marketing)
  • Provide awareness presentations (Marketing)
  • Make connections-school to school, etc.
  • Communicate with local coordinator and point of
    contact about implementation progress, e.g. forms
    required and timelines for forms

19
Roles of the Coach
  • Communicate with team (phone calls, emails,
    attend team meetings)
  • Ensure that team has agenda, data, team
    implementation checklist-Form A, action plan)
  • Ensure team communicates to staff (Marketing)
  • Provide awareness presentations (Marketing)
  • Make connections-school to school etc
  • Communicate with local coordinator, point of
    contact- Forms Matrix

20
Positive Nag and Cheerleader
  • Provide frequent, positive communication
  • Find positives in school data
  • Provide edible reinforcers, thank yous, other
    kudos
  • Celebrate successes
  • Cc-ing key people, PR contact, presentations
  • Encourage positive behavior by administrator
  • Maintain coaches school binder
  • Means of documenting efforts and celebrating
    success
  • Encourage teams documentation of programming

21
Empower the Team Leader
  • Meet with Team Leader outside of scheduled
    meetings
  • Work behind the scenes
  • Establish rapport, encouragement, guidance
  • Foster the image of the Team Leader
  • Within Team meetings and School system
  • Encourage independence with website
  • Offer tools from toolkit and other resources

22
Facilitating vs. Leading
Facilitator Team Leader
Ensures the team meets regularly Sets the dates for meetings
Offers tools to assist in record keeping, team evaluations, etc. Checks accuracy of records, directs team in evaluation
Ensures equal distribution of roles and responsibilities Assumes the role of leader, delegates, assigns tasks
Ensures the team is using data for decision making Refers the team to the data during team meetings
23
Be a Resource for Information and a Liaison
  • Multiple levels
  • School(s), LSS coordinator, MSDE
  • Attend coaches meetings and other training
    opportunities
  • Collect data for state or LSS Coordinator
  • Forms
  • Distribute information (timing is everything)
  • Toolkit

24
Information Resource and Liaison
  • Organizational tips
  • Notebook System, for example
  • 1 School notebook (products specific to the
    individual school)
  • 2 Coachs Toolkit (samples of products such as
    matrix, lesson plans, parent involvement ideas,
    classroom strategies, etc.)
  • 3 Technical Information, i.e., samples of
    forms, coachs meeting minutes, other references,
    etc.)
  • Monthly Form Requirements (timeline for data
    collection)
  • Readily-Available Contact Information
  • Schools Team Group Contact for email
  • Phone contact numbers
  • Websites and links
  • Seek out answers/support as needed

25
Facilitate Data-Based Decision-Making
  • Use data to measure outcomes
  • SWIS access
  • Consult with SWIS Facilitator as needed
  • Obtain Read-only passwords and use as needed
  • DRIP (Data Rich, Information Poor)
  • What is your question?
  • What data do you need to answer the question?
  • Can you explain the data?
  • Refer to the general data-based decision making
    rules

26
Data-Based Decision Making Rules
If Focus on.
gt40 of students received 1 ODR gt2.5 ODRs per student School-wide System
gt60 of referrals come from classroom gt50 of ODR come from lt10 of classrooms Classroom System
gt35 of referrals come from non-classroom settings gt15 of students referred from non-classroom settings Non-Classroom Systems
gt10-15 students receive gt5 ODR Targeted Group Interventions
lt10 students with gt10 ODR lt10 students continue rate of referrals after receiving targeted group support small students destabilizing overall functioning of school Individualized Action Team Systems
27
Staff Development for Coaches
  • One day training for coaches prior to PBIS team
    training at the Summer Institute
  • State coaches meetings three times per year
  • District meetings (monthly, quarterly, or other
    schedule at the discretion of the district)
  • District meetings for team leaders and coaches
    for joint training

28
Coaches Professional DevelopmentIncrease
Fluency about.
  • PBIS critical features
  • Practices, systems, and data
  • Data-based decision making and analysis
  • Classroom behavior management strategies
  • Functional basis of behavior and supports
  • Intervention strategies for identified students

29
Coaches Self-Assessment
  • Assists in identifying strengths
  • Assists in identifying professional development
    goals
  • Assesses knowledge across levels of
  • Data
  • Practices
  • Systems
  • Three forms available
  • Coach
  • Coach facilitator/trainer or lead coach
  • Coach coordinator

30
Coaches Self-Assessment
  • Scoring Self-Assessment
  • 3 Fluent/Mastered
  • 2 Building skills, but not fluent
  • 1 Still learning

31
Coaches Self-Assessment Data
  • Is familiar with multiple data collection systems
    and their uses
  • ODRs, SET, surveys, achievement scores
  • Can assist schools to develop other data systems
    as needed
  • Can teach and support teams use of data to guide
    decision-making

32
Coaches Self-Assessment Practices
  • Knows and can define the essential features of
    school-wide PBIS
  • Understands features of effective classroom
    instruction and management
  • Can guide schools in identifying and adopting
    evidence-based practices
  • Knows strategies to increase appropriate and
    decrease inappropriate behavior of groups
  • Can provide schools with models and examples of
    other schools implementing PBIS
  • Understands basic principles of applied behavior
    analysis (i.e., reinforcement, punishment,
    stimulus control, etc.)

33
Coaches Self-Assessment Systems
  • Can facilitate effective team meetings
  • Can provide effective consultation and technical
    assistance to school teams
  • Able to effectively communicate within and across
    schools
  • Can assist schools to establish systems that
    support staff and increase sustainability of PBIS
    efforts

34
Growth of Coaching in Maryland
  • With the expansion of PBIS in Maryland there has
    come a need to coordinate the implementation of
    PBIS within the larger districts
  • The larger districts have identified a Coach
    Facilitator

35
Role of the Coach Facilitator
  • Coordinate district implementation of PBIS
  • Provide technical assistance to coaches
  • Serve on the Maryland State PBIS Leadership Team
  • Markets PBIS to key stakeholders in their
    districts
  • Liaison between the state leadership and the
    district

36
Successes
  • Contributed to the fidelity of the implementation
    of PBIS in Maryland
  • Contributed to the expansion of PBIS within each
    district and across the state
  • Enhanced collegial collaboration and staff
    development among coaches
  • Widened coaches understanding of a systems
    approach to implementation

37
Challenges
  • Supervision of coaches
  • Is it an add-on? Coaching may or may not be
    included in the job descriptions, depending on
    the school system, but merely encouraged
  • PBIS Team Meeting Schedules interference with
    coaches other job responsibilities

38
Challenges
  • Ensuring that coaches have fluency in PBIS
    implementation
  • Good fit between coach and school, especially
    when using an external model
  • Having enough coaches per school

39
Questions and Answers
40
For additional information
  • National PBIS website
  • www.pbis.org
  • Maryland PBIS website
  • www.pbismaryland.org
  • School-wide Information System (SWIS) website
  • www.swis.org
  • Elsa Velez, Ph.D., NCSP
  • evelez_at_ccboe.com
  • Joan Ledvina Parr, Ph.D.
  • jparr_at_bcps.org
  • Virginia L. Dolan, Ed.D., NCSP
  • vdolan_at_aacps.org
  • Susan Barrett
  • sbarrett_at_pbismaryland.org
About PowerShow.com