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SUN SAFETY

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SUN SAFETY Protecting Yourself from UV Radiation * * Main cause: Too much exposure to the sun and UV light- how many of you have been in a tanning bed or have spent a ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: SUN SAFETY


1
SUN SAFETY
  • Protecting Yourself from UV Radiation

2
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • What is Ultraviolet Radiation?

3
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • The sun is the energy source that sustains all
    life on earth.
  • Ultraviolet Radiation (UV) is simply one form of
    energy coming from the sun.

4
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • Sunlight contains 3 types of UV rays

5
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • UVA
  • Causes skin aging, wrinkles, and can cause
    cancer.
  • Used in tanning beds to give skin a darker color.
  • A light needed for vitamin D synthesis in our
    body.
  • UVA rays pass effortlessly through the ozone
    layer.

6
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • UVB
  • Causes sunburns, cataracts, immune system damage,
    skin cancer.
  • Melanoma may be associated with severe UVB
    sunburns occurring before the age of 20.
  • Most UVB rays are absorbed by the ozone layer.

7
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • UVC
  • Rays are the most dangerous.
  • Fortunately, these rays are blocked by the ozone
    layer and dont reach the earth.

8
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • Clouds and pollution dont filter out UV rays,
    and can give a false sense of protection.
  • This can cause unexpected sunburn and skin
    damage. Be careful!

9
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • Strongest when it is highest in the sky (normally
    from 10 AM to 4 PM).
  • Strongest during the summer.
  • Greater at high altitudes. Skiers need to take
    extra care.
  • UV radiation can reflect off of light surfaces
    such as snow, sand, and concrete.
  • Greater at low latitudes.

10
Ultraviolet Radiation - UV
  • The UV Index predicts the next days UV levels
    on a 0-10 scale.
  • UV Index
  • Developed by the National Weather Service and
    the EPA.

UV Index Number Exposure Level Minutes to Burn
0 to 2 Minimal 60
3 to 4 Low 45
5 to 6 Moderate 30
7 to 9 High 15
10 Very high 10
11
Effects of UV Exposure
  • Sunburn

12
Permanent Skin Damage!
13
Effects of UV Exposure
  • Sunburn develops when the amount of UV exposure
    is greater than the protection your skins
    melanin can provide.
  • The lighter your skin, the less melanin it has to
    absorb UV and protect itself.
  • All skin, no matter the color, thickens and
    hardens with continued sun exposure, resulting in
    wrinkles later in life.

14
  • Melanin A skin pigment. Dark-skinned people have
    more melanin than light- skinned people. Melanin
    acts as a sunscreen and protects the skin from
    ultraviolet light.

15
Melanin is produced by cells called melanocytes.
Melanocytes increase their production of melanin
in response to sun exposure. Freckles are small,
concentrated areas of increased melanin
production.
16
Effects of UV Exposure
  • Skin Damage

17
Effects of UV Exposure
  • Compare the underside of your arm to the topside
    of your arm to see the effect of sun exposure on
    your skin.
  • Sun damage causes wrinkles, easy bruising,
    brown liver spots, and potentially, skin
    cancer.

18
MelanomaWhat is it?
  • Long Definition Melanoma is a form of skin
    cancer that occurs in the pigmented-producing
    skin cells (melanocytes). These cells become
    abnormal, grow uncontrollably and aggressively
    invade surrounding tissues
  • May affect only the skin or may spread
    (metastasize) through the blood or lymph system
    to other organs and bones.
  • Short Definition IT IS THE MOST DEADLY FORM OF
    SKIN CANCER.

19
Risk Factors for Melanoma
  • Main cause Too much exposure to the sun and UV
    light
  • Family history of melanoma
  • Presence of atypical moles
  • History of blistering sunburns as a teen
  • Red or blonde hair
  • Freckling
  • Having had a melanoma before

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Stages
  • Stage 1
  • Tumor has not spread. Five year survival 95
  • Stage 2
  • Tumor has not spread. Five year survival 77-79
  • Stage 3
  • Tumor has started to metastasize, spread to lymph
    nodes. Five year survival 30-59
  • Stage 4
  • Tumor as spread beyond regional lymph nodes to
    distant sites and organs. Five year survival
    7-19

22
Statistics
  • Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in
    the US. More than 1 million skin cancers are
    diagnosed annually.
  • Melanoma is the third most common cancer in women
    ages 20-39.
  • In 2010, approximately 68,130 melanomas were
    diagnosed , with nearly 8,700 resulting in death.
  • 80 of our lifetime sun exposure/sun damage
    occurs before the age of 18.
  • Exposure to tanning beds before age 35 increases
    melanoma risk by 75.
  • National Cancer Institute at the National
    Institutes of Health
  • www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/melanoma

23
Statistics
  • One person dies every hour from Melanoma.
  • The American Academy of Dermatology has predicted
    malignant melanoma may become the number-one
    cause of cancer deaths in America by 2025
  • Skin cancer affects one in five Americans.

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ABCDE of Diagnosis
  • A Assymetry
  • B Border irregularity
  • C Color - unusual or changing
  • D Diameter gt 6mm
  • E Evolution, the Ugly Duckling

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29
Only takes 5 sunburns to double your risk of
cancer!
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31
Treatment
  • For early-stage melanomas
  • Surgery (or simple biopsy) to remove the melanoma
    spot
  • Treating melanomas that have spread
  • Surgery
  • Chemotherapy
  • Radiation
  • Immunotherapy

32
Prevention
  • Reduce amount of time spent in the sun
  • When in the sun, make sure you are well-protected
  • Become familiar with your skin
  • Regularly see a dermatologist

33
Prevention
  • Back to statistics..
  • 80 of our lifetime sun exposure/sun damage
    occurs before age 18.
  • Prevention efforts need to focus on creating
    healthy sun habits in children and adolescents
  • Apply sunscreen as frequently as you brush your
    teeth.

34
Prevention
  • Avoid tanning salons.
  • Avoid tanning salons.
  • Avoid tanning salons.
  • Avoid tanning salons.

35
Tanning - History
  • Being pale as possible was desirable, a long time
    ago, because it was a sign of wealth.

36
Tanning - History
  • Then came Coco Chanel in the 1920s, and a tan
    became a sign of wealth and the ability to afford
    expensive holidays.

37
The Tanning Industry
  • Nearly 30 million Americans frequent tanning
    salons every year
  • 71 of tanning salon patrons are women and girls
    aged 16-29
  • Tanning industry makes about
  • 5 billion annually

38
The Tanning Epidemic
  • Celebrities tan
  • The Jersey Shore GTLs
  • Your friends, colleagues, relatives
  • may tan

39
  • Remember the statistic I gave you before?
    Exposure to tanning beds before age 35 increases
    melanoma risk by 75.
  • Think about it

40
  • 8 Hours in the sun 15 minutes in a tanning bed
  • Tanning beds are 30X stronger than the sun.
  • Regardless of which, they both create a burn,
    which is

41
Tanning
  • visible proof that your skin has cellular
    damage.

42
Tanning Myths
  • Tanning beds are a safe way to tan.
  • Sunscreen provides complete protection from the
    sun
  • Getting a base tan protects your skin.
  • People with darker-toned skin dont have to worry
    about sun damage.
  • Theres no need to worry about sun damage on a
    cloudy or cold day.

43
Tanning Movement to Create Change
.
  • Legislation regarding minors
  • At least 32 states regulate their use and require
    parental permission under a certain age (14, 16,
    or 18).
  • At least 11 states ban their use under the age of
    14
  • At least 18 states require the operator to limit
    exposure time provide eye protection
  • Source AIM at Melanoma, Centers for Disease
    Control and Prevention and NCSL, 2010.

44
Melanoma cases surge among young women !!
  • The incidence of the deadly skin cancer increased
    by 50 between 1980 and 2004, a study finds. Use
    of tanning salons is cited as one reason.

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47
SPF Sun Protection Factor
  • Sunscreen doesnt offer 100 protection.
  • SPF 15 sunscreen blocks 93 of UV SPF 30
    blocks out 97 and SPF 50 blocks out 98.
  • Sunscreen should have a SPF of at least 15 and
    provide protection from both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Using SPF 30 instead of SPF 15 does not mean
    you can safely double your time in the sun.

48
SPF Guidelines for Protection
  • Apply sunscreen 30 minutes before going outside.
    Dont rub it ina light film should stay visible.
  • Reapply any sunscreen every two hours, even on
    cloudy days.
  • Reapply after sweating or swimming.

49
Effects of UV Exposure
  • Eye Damage

50
Effects of UV Exposure
  • Spending long hours in the sun with no eye
    protection may increase your chance of developing
    cataracts.
  • Even low amounts of sunlight can increase the
    risk of eye disorders.
  • UVB damage to the eyes is cumulative, so it is
    never too late to start protecting your eyes.

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52
Guidelines for Protection
  • Eye Protection

53
Guidelines for Protection
  • Sunglasses offer excellent protection.
  • Make sure the lenses are designed to block out
    100 of UVA and UVB.
  • Remember to wear sunglasses even when you're in
    the shade.

54
Effects of UV Exposure
Immune System
  • Scientists believe sunburns can alter the bodys
    immune system for up to 24 hours after exposure
    to the sun.
  • Repeated overexposure to UV radiation can cause
    more damage to the bodys immune system, even in
    people with dark skin.

55
Guidelines for Protection
  • Tanning Protection

56
Avoid Sun Tanning and Tanning Beds
  • Tanning Beds can cause cancer!!

57
Be sure to wear sunscreen!!
58
Guidelines for Protection
  • Do not burn!
  • Seek shade
  • Wear protective clothing
  • Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand
  • Check UV Index
  • Get vitamin D safely through your diet

59
Guidelines for Protection
  • Wear Protective Clothing

60
Tanning beds also cause leathering of the skin.
61
Guidelines for Protection
  • Choose clothes that cover your arms, legs and
    neck to ensure proper protection.
  • Most cotton and cotton/polyester fabrics protect
    against 95 of UV, but are less effective if wet,
    faded, or aged.

62
Be safe in the sun!
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