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Rococo

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Rococo 18th century Often considered the last stage of the Baroque. Derived from the French word, rocaille, or rock-work. The softer side of the ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Rococo


1
Rococo 18th century
  • Often considered the last stage of the Baroque.
  • Derived from the French word, rocaille, or
    rock-work.
  • The softer side of the Baroque or a reaction
    against it. A backlash to the darkness of the
    Baroque ? less formal grandiose.
  • The Rococo palette, softer and paler pastels
    than the rich primary colors and dark tonalities
    of the Baroque style.
  • Begun as a French style of interior decoration
    begun following Louis XIVs death.
  • French power and fashion centered around the
    court of the Regent, Philippe dOrleáns at the
    Palais-Royal in Paris.
  • Elegant and ornately decorative, mood
    lighthearted and witty.
  • Gave way to Neo-classicism.

2
1. Fantasy Wistful Nostalgia
An emphasis on ultra beauty and nature. Classical
gods and goddesses.
Winter by Etienne-Maurice Falconet, 1771
3
The Triumph of Venus François Boucher, 1740
4
2. Love, Romance, Eroticism
about Boucher His canvases often seem to
consist of little beyond mounds of pink flesh
The Toilet of Venus by François Boucher, 1751
5
The Stolen Kiss Jean Honoré Fragonard, 1787-1788
Also, The Swing
6
3. Domestic Family Life
Portrays the carefree life of the upper class.
The Galante style. Informal, decorous intimacy of
peoples manners.
7
The Basilica at Ottobeueren, Bavaria
8
Neo-Classicism mid-late 18th and 19th century
  • use of ancient Greek and Roman models and motifs
  • development was greatly influenced by the
    excavations at Pompeii and Herculaneum
  • closely linked to the Enlightenment's rejection
    of the aristocratic frivolity of Rococo, the
    style of the Ancien Régime.
  • More than just an antique revival ? a reaction
    against the surviving Baroque Rococo styles.

9
Overview of Neo-Classicism
  • Revolutions established republics in France and
    in America. Neo-Classicism was adapted as the
    official art style.
  • Association with the democracy of Greece and the
    republicanism of Rome.
  • Napoleon ? used the style for propaganda.
  • Return to the perceived purity of the arts of
    Rome.
  • Model the ideal of the ancient Greek arts and,
    to a lesser, extent, 16c Renaissance classicism.
  • A conviction that there is a permanent, universal
    way things are (and should be), which obviously
    entails fundamental political and ethical
    commitments.

10
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11
The Federal Style in America
Monticello, VA
U. S. Capitol
12
The Death of Socrates Jacques-Louis David, 1787
The death of Socrates was a symbol of republican
virtue.
13
The Consecration of Napoleon
Josephine Jacques-Louis David, 1805-1807
A very different theme The celebration of
worldly splendor and power.
14
The Apotheosis of Homer Jean-Auguste-Dominique
Ingres, 1827
This assembly of great artists and writers of all
ages gathered to honor the ancient Greek poet
before a classical temple.
15
RomulusVictory over Acron Jean-Auguste-Dominiqu
e Ingres, 1812
Painted for Napoleons palace in Rome.
16
Neo-Classical Sculpture
Profoundly influenced by ancient art since the
Renaissance. Neo-Classical sculptors avoided the
dramatic twisting poses and colored marble
surfaces characteristic of late Baroque and
Rococo sculpture. They preferred crisp contours,
a noble stillness idealized in pure white marble
forms.
17
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18
Romanticism 19th century
  • The Artistic expression of Liberalism
  • Early support of the French Revolution.
  • Rise of the individual ? alienation.
  • Dehumanization of industrialization.
  • Harkening back to the simplicity of rural life.
  • Expressions of emerging force of nationalism
  • Began in the 1790s and peaked in the 1820s.
  • Mostly in Northern Europe, especially in Britain
    and Germany.
  • A reaction against classicism.

19
AP MC Question
Wandering Above the Sea of Fog Caspar David
Friedrich, 1818
20
The Dreamer Gaspar David Friedrich, 1835
21
The Slave Ship Joseph Mallord William Turner, 1842
22
Flatford Mill John Constable, 1817
23
Liberty Leading the People Eugène Delacroix, 1830
24
Realism Mid 19th century
  • The accurate and apparently objective description
    of the ordinary, observable world
  • the truthful and accurate depiction of the models
    that nature and contemporary life offer Subjects
    are depicted in as straightforward a manner as
    possible
  • Ordinary people and everyday activities are
    worthy subjects for art
  • A reaction to the idealized excesses of
    Romanticism and Neoclassicism.
  • A guiding influence on the philosophy of the
    Impressionists

25
The Gleaners, Jean-François Millet, 1857
26
The Winnowers, Gustave Courbet,, 1853
27
The Stonebreakers, Gustave Courbet
28
Impressionism mid-late 19th century
  • Impressionist style probably the single most
    successful and identifiable "movement in
    European Art history
  • The movement's name was derived from Monet's
    early work, Impression Sunrise and critics who
    felt works were unfinished sketches or
    impressions
  • Challenge and response to the emerging art of
    Photography
  • The focus on subjectivity intensified
  • Artists became more concerned with the individual
    expression.
  • Reality became what the individual saw.
  • With Impressionism the subjectivity of modem art
    was born.

29
As an extension of Realism
  • Impressionists remained realists in the sense
    that they remained true to their sensations of
    the object
  • Realism meant to an Impressionist that the
    painter ought to record the most subtle
    sensations of reflected light.
  • Concern for realistically representing an object
    faded, while concern for representing the
    subjective grew.

30
As a reaction / rejection
  • Critics and the public agreed the Impressionists
    couldnt draw and their colors were considered
    vulgar. Their compositions were strange. Their
    short, slapdash brushstrokes made their paintings
    practically illegible. Why didnt these artists
    take the time to finish their canvases, viewers
    wondered?
  • Rejected by the Salon, the annual French
    state-sponsored exhibition that offered the only
    real opportunity for artists to display and sell
    their work, they created an independent
    exhibition, mounted in what was formerly a
    photographers studio

31
Leading figures
  • Claude Monet
  • August Renoir
  • Edgar Degas
  • Berthe Morisot
  • Mary Cassatt  
  • Gustave Caillebotte
  • Edouard Manet
  • Paul Cézanne
  • Camille Pissarro
  • Pierre-Auguste Renoir
  • Paul Gauguin
  • Childe Hassam
  • Georges Seurat

32
Haystacks at Chailly at Sunrise, Claude Monet
1865
33
Impression, Sunrise, Claude Monet, 1872
34
Races at Longchamp, Edouard Manet, 1867
35
The Railway, Edouard Manet, 1873
36
The Floor Scrapers, Gustave Caillebotte
37
The Dance Class, Edgar Degas, 1874
38
The Luncheon at the Boating Party, Renoir, 1881
39
A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande
Jatte, Georges Seurat, 1884-86
Pointillism
40
Expressionism late 19th early and mid 20th
century
  • Art which distorts reality through exaggeration
    for emotional effect / impact
  • Later, the movement stood out against fascism and
    this, together with its so called 'degenerate'
    qualities led to the persecution of many
    Expressionist artists by Nazis

41
Roots and Tree Trunk, Van Gogh, 1890
42
The Starry Night, Van Gogh, 1889
43
The Scream, Edvard Munch,1893
Expressionism
  • Using bright colors to express a particular
    emotion.

44
Cubism Early 20th century
  • Key concept underlying Cubism is that the essence
    of an object can only be captured by showing it
    from multiple points of view simultaneously
  • Subject matter portrayed by geometric forms
    without realistic detail, stressing the abstract.
  • The artist should treat nature in terms of the
    cylinder, the sphere, and the cone.
  • The subject matter is broken down, analyzed, and
    reassembled in abstract form.

45
Nude Descending a Staircase, Marcel Duchamp, 1912
46
Studio with Plaster Head, Picasso, 1925
47
Violin Candlestick, Georges Braque, 1910
48
Surrealism
  • Late 1920s-1940s.
  • Came from the nihilistic genre of DaDa.
  • Influenced by Freuds theories on psychoanalysis
    and the subconscious.
  • Confusing startling images like those in
    dreams.

49
Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonition
of Civil War), Salvador Dali, 1936
50
The Persistence of Memory, Salvador Dali, 1931
51
Geopoliticus Child Watching the Birth of a New
Man, Salvador Dali, 1943
52
Abstract Impressionism
  • First American art movement to gain world-wide
    influence
  • Put NY as center of art world
  • Characterized by spontaneity, emotion, bold
    colors often on large canvas
  • Came out of surrealism
  • Major Artists-
  • Jackson Pollock
  • drip painting ? stand on canvas and paint
    around
  • William De Kooning

53
Pollock, No. 5
54
Pollock, Lavender Mist
55
De Kooning, Woman V
56
Pop Art
  • Subject matter based on visual clichés and the
    impersonal style of mass-media imagery.
  • Often aimed at broad audiences
  • Sometimes uses mechanical means of reproduction
  • Andy Warhol and Claus Oldenburg
  • Last modern art before post-modern art

57
Warhol, Campbells Soup Cans
58
Warhol, Turquoise Marilyn
59
Oldenburg
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