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Chapter 1 Introduction EIN 3390 Manufacturing Processes Summer A, 2011

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Chapter 1 Introduction EIN 3390 Manufacturing Processes Summer A, 2011 * Interactive Factors in Manufacturing Factors Product design Materials Labor costs Equipment ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 1 Introduction EIN 3390 Manufacturing Processes Summer A, 2011


1
Chapter 1 Introduction EIN 3390
Manufacturing Processes Summer A, 2011
2
Interactive Factors in Manufacturing
  • Factors
  • Product design
  • Materials
  • Labor costs
  • Equipment
  • Manufacturing costs
  • Strategies to reduce cost
  • Lean manufacturing
  • Systems approach

3
Product Development
  • Sustaining technology
  • Innovations bring more value to the consumer
  • Improvements in materials, processes, and design
  • Product growth normally follows the S curve

Figure 1-1a) A product development curve
4
Manufacturing and Production Systems
  • Manufacturing is the ability to make goods and
    services to satisfy societal needs
  • Manufacturing processes are strung together to
    create a manufacturing system (MS)
  • Production system is the total company and
    includes manufacturing systems

5
The functions and Systems of the Production System
6
Production System- The Enterprise
  • Production systems include
  • People
  • Money
  • Equipment
  • Materials
  • Supplies
  • Markets
  • Management
  • Manufacturing System
  • All aspects of commerce

7
Manufacturing Systems
  • Manufacturing systems
  • Collection of operations and processes to produce
    a desired product or component
  • Design or arrangement of the manufacturing
    processes
  • Manufacturing processes
  • Convert unfinished materials to finished products
  • Often are a set of steps
  • Machine tool is an assembly that produces a
    desired result

8
Common Aspects of Manufacturing
  • Job and station
  • Job is a group of related operations generally
    done at one station
  • Station is the location or area where production
    is done
  • Operations
  • Distinct action to produce a desired result or
    effect
  • Categories of operations
  • Materials handling and transport
  • Processing
  • Packaging
  • Inspecting and testing
  • Storing

9
Common Aspects of Manufacturing
  • Treatments operate continuously on a workpiece
  • Heat treating, plating, finishing, chemical
    cleaning, painting, curing, galvanizing
  • Tools, tooling and workholders
  • Lowest mechanism in the production is a tool
  • Used to hold, shape or form the unfinished
    product
  • Tooling for measurement and inspection
  • Rulers, calipers, micrometers, and gages
  • Precision devices are laser optics or vision
    systems that utilize electronics to interpret
    results

10
Products and Fabrications
  • Products result from manufacture
  • Manufacturing can be from either fabricating or
    processing
  • Fabricating is the manufacture of a product from
    pieces such as parts, components, or assemblies
  • Processing is the manufacture of a product by
    continuous operations
  • Workpiece and its configuration
  • Primary objective of manufacturing is to produce
    a component having a desired geometry, size, and
    finish

11
Roles of Engineers in Manufacturing
  • Design engineer responsibilities
  • What the design is to accomplish
  • Assumptions that can be made
  • Service environments the product must withstand
  • Final appearance of the product
  • Product designed with the knowledge that certain
    manufacturing processes will be used

12
Roles of Engineers in Manufacturing
  • Manufacturing engineer responsibilities
  • Select and coordinate specific processes and
    equipment
  • Supervise and manage their use
  • Industrial (Manufacturing) engineer
  • Manufacturing systems layout, time study, cost
  • Materials engineers
  • Specify ideal materials
  • Develop new and better materials

13
Changing World Competition
  • Globalization has impacted manufacturing
  • Worldwide competition for global products and
    their manufacture
  • High tech manufacturing for advanced technology
  • New manufacturing systems, designs, and management

14
Manufacturing Systems Designs
  • Five manufacturing system designs
  • Job shop
  • Flow shop
  • Linked-cell shop
  • Project shop
  • Continuous process

15
Job Shop
Figure 1-7 This rack bar machining area is
functionally designed so it operates like a job
shop, with lathes, broaches, and grinders lined
up.
16
Flow Shop
Figure 1-8 The moving assembly line for cars is
an example of the flow shop.
17
Mass Production to Lean Production
Figure 1-9 The traditional subassembly lines can
be redesigned into U-shaped cells as part of the
conversion of mass production to lean production.
18
Forming Process
Figure 1-11 The forming process used to make a
fender for a car.
19
Forming Process
Figure 1-11
20
Single-Point Metalcutting
Figure 1-12 Single-point metalcutting process
(turning) produces a chip while creating a new
surface on the workpiece.
21
Characteristics of Process Technology
  • Mechanics (static or dynamic)
  • Economics or costs
  • Time Spans
  • Constraints
  • Uncertainties and process reliability
  • Skills
  • Flexibility
  • Process capability

22
Figure 1-14 Product life-cycle costs change with
the classic manufacturing system designs.
23
Manufacturing Systems and Production Volumes
Figure 1-16 This figure shows in a general way
the relationship between manufacturing systems
and production volumes.
24
Summary
  • Economical and successful manufacturing requires
    knowledge of the relationships between labor,
    materials, and capital
  • Design a manufacturing system that everyone
    understands
  • Engineers must possess a knowledge of design,
    metallurgy, processing, economics, accounting,
    and human relations
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