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The Face of Emergency Management Education: 2007 FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Program Report

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Title: The Face of Emergency Management Education: 2007 FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Program Report


1
The Face of Emergency Management
Education2007 FEMA Emergency Management Higher
Education Program Report
Carol L. Cwiak North Dakota State University
2
First and foremost
  • THANK YOU!

3
Methodology
  • Eight-page survey instrument sent to all
  • institutions on the FEMA Higher Ed webpage
  • offering emergency management programs
  • One survey per institution


Minard Hall, North Dakota State University, 2007
4
  • Institutional Response Rate
  • 66 responses three sweeps
  • 60 response rate across programs
  • Covering 100 of the listed programs
  • 121 program classifications reported

5
Programs Surveyed
Table 1
Program List Responses Received Number of Institutions Total List Entries Institution Response Percentage
Associate 20 36 36 56
Bachelor - Concentration 10 18 20 56
Bachelor 10 16 16 63
Masters 24 36 40 67
Doctoral 5 7 7 71
Stand-Alone 31 49 51 63
Total Program Responses 100
6

Program Classifications Reported
Table 2
Program Classification Number Reported
Certificate 38
Concentration with undergraduate minor 8
Minor 6
Associate Degree 19
Bachelors Degree 12
Masters Degree 14
Doctoral Degree 1
Masters Level Concentration or similar program 15
Doctoral Level Concentration or similar program 4
Other 4
7
Programs Years in Existence
  • Range 0-25 years
  • More than 74 of all programs in
  • existence for less than 5 years

8
Number of Students Enrolled
9
Program Focus
Other dual sector or non-profit focus
10
Program Purpose
Average across programs indicating blend
(n36) 43
Pre-employment 57
Advancement
11
Faculty Representation
  • Full-time Faculty
  • 28 - none
  • 60 - 1-3
  • 8 - 4-5
  • 4 - 6-9
  • Part-time Faculty
  • 12 - none
  • 60 - 1-5
  • 28 - 6-30

12
Faculty Representation
  • Associated Faculty
  • 53 - none
  • 21 - 1
  • 10 - 2
  • 16 - 3
  • Devoted Faculty
  • 33 - none
  • 38 - 1
  • 12 - 2
  • 11 - 3
  • 6 - 5

13
Faculty Representation
14
New Program Hires
  • 66 reported their programs did not attempt to
    hire
  • 6 attempted to hire, but ultimately did not
  • 28 did hire new faculty or program staff (n
    18)
  • One 33 Three 11
  • Two 33 Four 23

15
Academic Credentials of New Hires
  • 53 new hires reported (18 programs)
  • 41 unspecified beyond status as adjunct
  • Remainder (n31) identified as such
  • Associate Degree 15
  • Masters Degree 23
  • Ph.D. Degree 13
  • Other 8
  • J.D. Degree (2) B.S. Degree (1)
  • M.D. Degree (2) A.B.D. (1)

16
Student Gender Representation
17
Student Age Representation
Average across programs - within programs
segmentation was more evident
18
Student Representation-Traditional vs.
Practitioner
Average across programs - within programs
segmentation was more evident
19
Programs Offering Distance Education
20
Percentage of Offerings Available Distance
Education
(n 41)
21
Enrollment and Graduation Trends
22
External Funding Opportunities
(e.g., grants, contracts, etc.)
23
Institutional Support
(e.g., stipends to develop courses/materials)
24
Library Resources
(e.g., ability to obtain new holdings)
25
Administrative Support
(e.g., support attempts to develop and implement
new program ideas)
26
Emergency Management Course Utilization
27
FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education
Courses
  • Disaster Response Operations Management (18)
  • Terrorism Emergency Management (16)
  • Business Industry Crisis Management (14)
  • Technology Emergency Management (13)
  • Homeland Security Emergency Management (11)
  • Principles Practice of Hazard Mitigation (11)
  • Building Disaster Resilient Communities (10)
  • Social Dimensions of Disaster (10)
  • Political Policy Basis of Emergency Management
    (9)

28
Additional Products, Activities Services
  • Downloadable library of lectures by guest
    speakers
  • Higher education list serv so institutions can
    have a dialogue and seek advice re program
    development, etc.
  • Tabletop exercises
  • Video/DVD and support materials
  • National media promotion of the degree programs
    and their role in professionalization and,
  • An additional staffer to take some of the
    pressure off of Dr. Blanchard.

29
The Top Challenges Facing Emergency Management
Programs
  • 1. Funding, funding funding!
  • 2. Emergency managements identity and
  • the academic credibility and
  • professionalism issues tied to it.
  • 3. Recruitment, enrollment and retention
  • issues as it applies to students.

30
The Top Challenges Facing Emergency Management
Programs
  • 4. Availability of qualified and competent
  • faculty and staff.
  • 5. Jobs and internships for students.
  • 6. Current and updated educational material.
  • 7. Finding a balance between practitioner and
  • scholarly content.

31
Anticipated Program Changes
  • Increasing the size of existing programs
  • Defining new programs redefining existing
    programs
  • Adding new course degree offerings
  • Reviews and updates to curriculum
  • Going on-line and,
  • Adding additional faculty with greater diversity
    of experience.

32
Anticipated Program Changes
  • Growing competition for students
  • Losing the program due to low enrollment
  • Limiting course offerings based on lack of
    students
  • Cooperation and collaboration across programs,
    departments and with government agencies
  • Adaptation to emerging issues and concepts and,
  • Greater program customization for individual
    students.

33
Conclusion
  • It behooves us - the emergency management
    higher education community - to meaningfully
    address not only the challenges that face our
    programs, but also to become advocates (and
    perhaps even stewards) of stability, growth and
    professionalism within the field.
  • We have a collective responsibility that
    far exceeds the reach of our individual programs
    to meaningfully prepare future generations of
    emergency management professionals. We cannot
    afford to fail in this endeavor as it is our
    communities that will suffer.

34
Contact Information
Carol L. Cwiak Department of Sociology,
Anthropology and Emergency Management North
Dakota State University P.O. Box 5075 Fargo, ND
58105 (701) 231-5847 carol.cwiak_at_ndsu.edu
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