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31st Annual Conference on The First-Year Experience

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31st Annual Conference on The First-Year Experience February, 2012 Summer Bridge and Beyond: First Year Experience Super Charged Bernita Sims-Tucker , Ph.D ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: 31st Annual Conference on The First-Year Experience


1
  • 31st Annual Conference on The First-Year
    Experience
  • February, 2012
  • Summer Bridge and Beyond First Year Experience
    Super Charged
  •  
  • Bernita Sims-Tucker , Ph.D., Associate Vice
    President for Academic Affairs
  • Robin Burton, MA., Acting Director of Retention

2
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE
  • The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES)
    is the doctoral degree granting,
    research/teaching University on Maryland's
    Eastern Shore, and the 1890 Land Grant
    institution for the State of Maryland.
  • UMES is a growing, primarily residential
    university with a teaching, research and
    extension mission consistent with its legacy as
    an 1890 Historically Black Land Grant
    institution. UMES emphasizes its commitment to
    equal educational opportunity, and strives to
    provide educational, research and public service
    programs to the state and region.

3
Thoughts About Retention
  • A schools retention management program should be
    based on best practices from existing retention
    research, and from campus-based retention and
    attrition data.
  • Retention programs should be practical,
    accountable and flexible.
  • Retention is in essence a process of improving
    the quality of student life and learning.
  • Engaging in this process enhances the overall
    institutional quality, effectiveness, and student
    success.

4
FIVE STEPS OF SUCCESSFULRETENTION PROGRAMS
  • Collect, compile, and analyze pertinent retention
    data and research
  • Implement early identification/alert and
    intervention strategies
  • Concentrate energies on the importance of
    teaching and learning
  • Create programs and services based on meeting
    students individual needs and differences, and
  • Emphasize a deliberate strategy of student
    engagement and involvement.

5
The Story
  • This is a story about four people named
    Everybody, Somebody, Anybody, and Nobody. There
    was an important job to be done Retention and
    Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it.
    Anybody could have done it, but Nobody did it.
    Somebody got angry about that, because it was
    Everybodys job. Everybody thought Anybody could
    do it, but Nobody realized that Everybody
    wouldnt do it. It ended up that Everybody
    blamed Somebody when Nobody did what Anybody
    could have.
    Author Unknown

6
Summer Bridge BeyondFYE Supercharged
  • Summer Enrichment Academy (SEA)
  • First-Year Experience Seminar
  • Mentor Program
  • Learning Community
  • E-Learning E-Communication

7
First-Year Experience Course (FYE)
  • Historical background
  • Academic departmental course offering
  • Academic advisors often teach the FYE course

8
Summer Bridge Program
  • Summer Enrichment Academy (SEA)-6 week
    residential program
  • Placement Testing (Accuplacer
  • Enroll in 6 credits (English and Mathematics)
  • Approximately 25 students per class
  • Intrusive tutoring, mentoring, and study groups

9
  • SUMMER ENRICHMENT ACADEMY
  • Outcomes
    Data

Data Summer 2008 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
Math 101
students enrolled 66 75 59
of students with Cgt 61 75 49
of students ltC 5 0 10
of students passing AST 61 75 59
students receiving A 6 12 13
students receiving B 8 38 19
students receiving C 32 25 17
students receiving D 2 0 8
students receiving F 3 0 2
students receiving Incomplete 6 0 0
Percent Passing 80 100 83
Data Summer 2008 Summer 2009 Summer 2010
English 101
student enrolled 66 75 59
of students with Cgt 61 72 59
of students ltC 5 3 0
students receiving A 4 23 22
students receiving B 18 35 26
students receiving C 38 14 11
students receiving D 5 2 0
students receiving F 0 1 (Plagiarism) 0
students receiving Incomplete 1 0 0
Percent Passing 92 96 100
10
PHASE ONE- FYE DEVELOPMENT
  • Campus-wide task force to develop uniformed
    course syllabus
  • Content, goals, objectives approved by all
    academic departments
  • Creation of a textbook to be used by all sections
    of FYE courses

11
Mentor Selection Criterion
  • Junior or senior classification
  • Minimum 2.8 GPA
  • Recommendation from academic department
  • Commitment to possible six to twelve hours of
    training per term
  • Commitment to the success of others
  • Commitment to leadership roles and
    responsibilities
  • Full-time student
  • Application and resume on file

12
Interview Process
  • Form selection committee
  • Pre-screening of application packets
  • Develop interview schedule

13
Final Selection
  • Score and rate candidates
  • Selections based upon number of mentors needed
    for each major
  • Lead mentor must be a current mentor who has
    demonstrated above average leadership,
    organizational, and communication skills
  • Lead mentor is the spokesperson, go-to person

14
Mentors roles
  • Co-facilitate first-year experience classes
  • Lead weekly study hall sessions and study groups
  • Assist first-year students with transition into
    college
  • Assist with Enrollment 101 and Course selection
    for first-year students
  • Facilitate first-year department programs
  • Act as liaisons between student affairs and
    academic affairs

15
Training
  • Beginning of year training
  • Weekly meetings
  • Participate in 5 professional development
    workshops per semester
  • End of semester training

16
Mentor Program Evaluation
  • Surveys administered to students and faculty in
    first-year classes
  • Fall 2010
  • 488 surveys-98 students said mentors added value
    to course
  • 17 surveys-99 faculty said mentors have overall
    positive impact on the FYE cohorts

17
MENTOR DATA
18
Student outreach
  • System approach to student outreach
  • Phone calls, e-mail, school-wide meetings
  • Strategic Retention Initiative
  • Peer mentor outreach-classroom, residence halls.
  • Center for Access and Academic Success (CAAS)
    outreach

19
Why does E-Learning work?
  • Most students are accustomed to having
    interactive and engagement with information via
    electronic media media (Beja, 2009)
  • From a budgetary perspective is easy to use and
    inexpensive
  • We live in an always connected generational
    society.we can reach students anytime any where

20
Advantages of E learning Tool
  • Increase accessibility
  • May be less intimidating to some than face to
    face contact in the office
  • Can reach more students more often

21
Use of Technology
  • E-mail, text messaging, cell phone calls,
  • Social Media- Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Tumblr
  • Teleprompter announcement of activities
  • PowerPoint presentations
  • Accutrack (weekly data collection)

22
Utilizing E-Learning
  • Blackboard
  • FYE organization
  • Common quizzes
  • Common final examination
  • Shared resources (games, puzzles, and various
    handouts)

23
Data Collection and Evaluation
  • Online course assessment for each academic class
  • Final examination
  • Pass rate, items analysis, and retention rate
  • Mentee and faculty survey
  • No e-learning assessment tool

24
Questions
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