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The Challenge: To Create More Value in All Negotiations

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Tom Peters Excellence. (Or What?) Annual Managers Convention Tel Aviv/26 June 2012 (s _at_ tompeters.com and excellencenow.com) Rose gardeners face a choice ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The Challenge: To Create More Value in All Negotiations


1
LONG VERSION Tom Peters Excellence. (Or
What?) Annual Managers Convention Tel Aviv/26
June 2012 (slides _at_ tompeters.com and
excellencenow.com)
2
1.
3
Conrad Hilton, at a gala celebrating his career,
was called to the podium and asked, What were
the most important lessons you learned in your
long and distinguished career? His answer
4
remember to tuck the shower curtain inside the
bathtub.
5
You get em in the door with location, location,
location. You keep em coming back with the
tucked in shower curtain. Profit rarely comes
from transaction 1 it is a byproduct of
transaction 2, 3, 4
6
Execution is strategy. Fred Malek
7
Sports You beat yourself!
8
Costco figured out the big, simple things and
executed with total fanaticism. Charles
Munger, Berkshire Hathaway
9
In real life, strategy is actually very
straightforward. Pick a general direction and
implement like hell. Jack Welch
10
Execution is the job of the business
leader.Larry Bossidy Ram Charan/ Execution
The Discipline of Getting Things Done
11
Execution is a systematic process of
rigorously discussing hows and whats,
tenaciously following through, and ensuring
accountability. Larry Bossidy Ram Charan/
Execution The Discipline of Getting Things Done
12
When assessing candidates, the first thing I
looked for was energy and enthusiasm for
execution. Does she talk about the thrill of
getting things done, the obstacles overcome, the
role her people played or does she keep
wandering back to strategy or philosophy?
Larry Bossidy, Execution
13
2.
14
(No Transcript)
15
Excellence1982 The Bedrock Eight
Basics 1. A Bias for Action 2. Close to the
Customer 3. Autonomy and Entrepreneurship 4.
Productivity Through People 5. Hands On,
Value-Driven 6. Stick to the Knitting 7. Simple
Form, Lean Staff 8. Simultaneous Loose-Tight
Properties
16
ExIn 1982-2002/Forbes.comDJIA 10,000
yields 85,000 EI 10,000 yields 140,050
Excellence Index/Basket of 32 publicly traded
stocks from the excellent companies/In Search
of Excellence
17
I am often asked how the
Excellent companies have fared. Some, to be
sure, were bombs. But, on the 20th anniversary of
the books publication, Forbes.com analyzed the
stock market performance of the firms. The
results, FYI, are on the prior slide. (In
addition to the satisfactory performance, Forbes
noted that, unlike the real world of stock-picker
indices, this analysis precluded selling off
stocks that were tankinghence the Index is at a
big disadvantage to standard indices yet it had
still done very well.) (For no particular reason,
neither I nor anyone else seems to have done a
subsequent analysis. Personally, Im not keen, as
a matter of ingrained habit, about dwelling on
the past.)
18
Organizations exist to serve. Period. Leaders
live to serve. Period.
19
I start with the premise that the function of
leadership is to produce more leaders, not more
followers. Ralph Nader
20
Hard is Soft. Soft is Hard.
21
People. Customers. Values.
Somemost?call these ideas softwhere are the
numbers and the plans? Surely there is room for
the numbers. But they are the real soft
stuffmalleable and manipulable. (As weve seen
again and again during the current economic
crisis.) The truly hard stuffwhich cant be
faked or exaggeratedare the relationships with,
for instance, our customers and our own
people. Hard is soft. Soft is
hard. Mantra 1 from In Search of EXCELLENCE.
22
3.
23
I am often asked by would-be entrepreneurs
seeking escape from life within huge corporate
structures, How do I build a small firm for
myself? The answer seems obvious Source
Paul Ormerod, Why Most Things Fail Evolution,
Extinction and Economics
24
I am often asked by would-be entrepreneurs
seeking escape from life within huge corporate
structures, How do I build a small firm for
myself? The answer seems obvious Buy a very
large one and just wait. Paul Ormerod, Why
Most Things Fail Evolution, Extinction and
Economics
25
Mr. Foster and his McKinsey colleagues collected
detailed performance data stretching back 40
years for 1,000 U.S. companies. They found that
none of the long-term survivors managed to
outperform the market. Worse, the longer
companies had been in the database, the worse
they did. Financial Times
26
Data drawn from the real world attest to a fact
that is beyond our control Everything in
existence tends to deteriorate. Norberto
Odebrecht, Education Through Work
27
When asked to name just one big merger that had
lived up to expectations, Leon Cooperman, former
cochairman of Goldman Sachs Investment Policy
Committee, answered Im sure there are success
stories out there, but at this moment I draw a
blank. Mark Sirower, The Synergy Trap
28
Not a single company that qualified as having
made a sustained transformation ignited its leap
with a big acquisition or merger. Moreover,
comparison companiesthose that failed to make a
leap or, if they did, failed to sustain itoften
tried to make themselves great with a big
acquisition or merger. They failed to grasp the
simple truth that while you can buy your way to
growth, you cannot buy your way to greatness.
Jim Collins/Time
29
MittELstand agile creatures darting
between the legs of the multinational
monsters(Bloomberg BusinessWeek) E.g. Goldmann
Produktion
30
The long-term strength of the German
economy can be captured in one word, and that
word is not BASF. Try Mittelstand. That is,
Germanys middle-sized, often high-tech firms
that tend to dominate this or that well-defined
global market niche. My simple point here is
that you can have a dominant economy that is not
led by or overly dependent upon enormous
firms. (I am one of the very few Americans to
have extensively studied the MittelstandMittlesta
nd companies were a principal feature of my 1992
book, Liberation Management. Typical was Goldmann
Produktion, a truly teensy tiny chemical company,
with a cast of a couple of dozen, that dominated
a truly tiny global niche associated with candle
coloring.)
31
Be the best. Its the only market thats not
crowded. From Retail Superstars Inside the 25
Best Independent Stores in America, George Whalin
32
Jungle Jims International Market, Fairfield,
Ohio An adventure in shoppertainment, as
Jungle Jims calls it, begins in the parking lot
and goes on to 1,600 cheeses and, yes, 1,400
varieties of hot sauce not to mention 12,000
wines priced from 8 to 8,000 a bottle all this
is brought to you by 4,000 vendors. Customers
come from every corner of the globe. Bronners
Christmas Wonderland, Frankenmuth, Michigan, pop
5,000 98,000-square-foot shop features the
likes of 6,000 Christmas ornaments, 50,000 trims,
and anything else you can name if it pertains to
Christmas. Source George Whalin, Retail
Superstars
33
Retail Superstars Inside the 25 Best Independent
Stores in America by George Whalin
34
Small Giants Companies That Choose to Be Great
Instead of Big
35
Small Giants Companies that Chose to
Be Great Instead of Big (Bo
Burlingham) They cultivated exceptionally
intimate relationships with customers and
suppliers, based on personal contact, one-on-one
interaction, and mutual commitment to delivering
on promises. Each company had an
extraordinarily intimate relationship with the
local city, town, or county in which it did
business a relationship that went well beyond
the usual concept of giving back. The
companies had what struck me as unusually
intimate workplaces. I noticed the passion that
the leaders brought to what the company did. They
loved the subject matter, whether it be music,
safety lighting, food, special effects, constant
torque hinges, beer, records storage,
construction, dining, or fashion.
36
4.
37
1/46
38
Lesson46 WTTMSW
39
Whoever Tries The Most Stuff Wins
40
Lesson46 WTTMSTFW
41
Whoever Tries The Most Things The Fastest Wins
42
READY.FIRE.AIM.H. Ross Perot (vs Aim! Aim!
Aim! /EDS vs GM/1985)
43
H. Ross Perot sold EDS to GM in the 1980s, and
went on the car giants Board. A few years later
he was asked to explain the difference between
the two companies. He said that at EDS the
strategy was Ready. Fire. Aim. I.e., get on
with itnow. At GM the strategy was Ready.
Aim. Aim. Aim. Aim. (Alas, well into the 1st
decade of the new century GMs problems/unwieldy
bureaucracy remained pretty much unchanged.)
44
We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were
omissions we didnt think of when we initially
wrote the software. We fixed them by doing it
over and over, again and again. We do the same
today. While our competitors are still sucking
their thumbs trying to make the design perfect,
were already on prototype version 5. By the
time our rivals are ready with wires and screws,
we are on version 10. It gets back to planning
versus acting We act from day one others plan
how to planfor months. Bloomberg by
Bloomberg
45
Burt Rutan wasnt a fighter jock he was an
engineer who had been asked to figure out why the
F-4 Phantom was flying pilots into the ground in
Vietnam. While his fellow engineers attacked such
tasks with calculators, Rutan insisted on
considering the problem in the air. A near-fatal
flight not only led to a critical F-4
modification, it also confirmed for Rutan a
notion he had held ever since he had built model
airplanes as a child. The way to make a better
aircraft wasnt to sit around perfecting a
design, it was to get something up in the air and
see what happens, then try to fix whatever goes
wrong. Eric Abrahamson David Freedman,
Chapter 8, Messy Leadership, from A Perfect
Mess The Hidden Benefits of Disorder
46
Culture of PrototypingEffective prototyping
may be the most valuable core competence an
innovative organization can hope to have.
Michael Schrage

47
Think about It!?Innovation Reaction to the
PrototypeSource Michael Schrage
48
Demo or die! Source This was the approach
championed by Nicholas Negroponte which vaulted
his MIT Media Lab to the forefront of
IT-multimedia innovation. It was his successful
alternative to the traditional MIT-academic
publish or perish. Negropontes
rapid-prototyping version was emblematic of the
times and the pace and the enormity of the
opportunity. (NYTimes/0426.11)
49
WctqpW
50
Whoever creates the quickest prototypes wins!
51
Experiment fearlesslySource Bloomberg
BusinessWeek, Type A Organization Strategies
How to Hit a Moving TargetTactic
1relentless trial and error Source
Wall Street Journal, cornerstone of effective
approach to rebalancing company portfolios in
the face of changing and uncertain global
economic conditions (11.08.10)
52
The secret to having good ideas is to have a lot
of ideas, then throw the bad ones away. Nobel
Laureate Linus Pauling
53
The difference between Bach and his forgotten
peers isnt necessarily that he had a better
ratio of hits to misses. The difference is that
the mediocre might have a dozen ideas, while
Bach, in his lifetime, created more than a
thousand full-fledged musical compositions. A
genius is a genius, psychologist Paul Simonton
maintains, because he can put together such a
staggering number of insights, ideas, theories,
random observations, and unexpected connections
that he almost inevitably ends up with something
great. Quality, Simonton writes, is a
probabilistic function of quantity. Malcolm
Gladwell, Creation Myth, New Yorker, 0516.11
54
Rose gardeners face a choice every spring. The
long-term fate of a rose garden depends on this
decision. If you want to have the largest and
most glorious roses of the neighborhood, you will
prune hard. This represents a policy of low
tolerance and tight control. You force the plant
to make the maximum use of its available
resources, by putting them into the the roses
core business. Pruning hard is a dangerous
policy in an unpredictable environment. Thus, if
you are in a spot where you know nature may play
tricks on you, you may opt for a policy of high
tolerance. You will never have the biggest roses,
but you have a much-enhanced chance of having
roses every year. You will achieve a gradual
renewal of the plant. In short, tolerant pruning
achieves two ends (1) It makes it easier to cope
with unexpected environmental changes. (2) It
leads to a continuous restructuring of the plant.
The policy of tolerance admittedly wastes
resourcesthe extra buds drain away nutrients
from the main stem. But in an unpredictable
environment, this policy of tolerance makes the
rose healthier in the long run. Arie De Geus,
The Living Company
55
5.
56
Read ItRichard Farson Ralph Keyes Whoever
Makes the Most Mistakes Wins The Paradox of
Innovation
57
Fail. Forward. Fast.High Tech CEO,
Pennsylvania
58
Fail faster. Succeed Sooner.David
Kelley/IDEO
59
No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail
better.Samuel Beckett
60
Reward excellent failures. Punish mediocre
successes.Phil Daniels, Sydney exec
61
In business, you reward people for taking risks.
When it doesnt work out you promote thembecause
they were willing to try new things. If people
tell me they skied all day and never fell down,
I tell them to try a different mountain.
Michael Bloomberg (BW/0625.07)
62
The secret of fast progress is inefficiency,
fast and furious and numerous failures.Kevin
Kelly
63
The Silicon Valley of today is built less atop
the spires of earlier triumphs than upon the
rubble of earlier debacles.Paul Saffo, tech
futurist, Palo Alto
64
Regis McKenna A lot of companies in the Valley
fail.Robert Noyce Maybe not enough
fail.RM What do you mean by that?RN
Whenever you fail, it means youre trying new
things.McKenna was the original Silicon
Valley marketing guruRobert Noyce was an
Intel co-founder and one of the fathers of the
modern information industry.Source Fast Company
65
Lesson46 WTTMSASTMSUTFW
66
Whoever Tries The Most Stuff (And Screws The
Most Stuff Up) The Fastest Wins
67
You miss 100 of the shots you never take.
Wayne Gretzky
68
6.
69
The Hang Out Axiom I We are What We Eat/We Are
the company we keep
70
You will become like the five people you
associate with the mostthis can be either a
blessing or a curse. Billy Cox
71
EMPLOYEES Are there enough weird people in the
lab these days?Source V. Chmn.,
pharmaceutical house, to a lab director
72
The We are what we eat/ We are who we hang
out with Axiom At its core, every (!!!)
relationship-partnership decision (employee,
vendor, customer, etc., etc.) is a strategic
decision about Innovate, Yes or No
73
Measure Strangeness/Portfolio
QualityStaffConsultantsVendorsOut-sourcing
Partners (, Quality)Innovation Alliance
PartnersCustomersCompetitors (who we
benchmark against) Strategic Initiatives
Product Portfolio (LineEx v. Leap)IS/IT
ProjectsHQ LocationLunch MatesLanguageBoard
74
CUSTOMERS Future-defining customers may account
for only 2 to 3 of your total, but they
represent a crucial window on the future.
Adrian Slywotzky, Mercer Consultants
75
CEO A.G. Lafley has shifted PGs focus on
inventing all its own products to developing
others inventions at least half the time. One
successful example, Mr. Clean Magic Eraser, is
based on a product found in an Osaka market.
Fortune
76
Wow! Wow! And Wow! PG had long been inward
looking when it came to new product
developmenttheir product developers were
best-in-class, so why look elsewhere? This
half-from-the-outside demand caused an
atomic-size explosion in the ranks. But, boy, did
it ever workand Mr. Lafley made it stick!
77
Dont benchmark, futuremark! Impetus The
future is already here its just not evenly
distributed William Gibson
78
Dont benchmark, Other mark!
79
A variation on the theme. Not only do we want to
seek out/learn from those living tomorrow
todaybut we want to learn from/evaluate against
others in entirely different worlds. That is,
the head of a 32-person finance department can
usefully benchmark other-mark against the
best hardware store in town on the dimension of
customer service. (And finance departments have
customers every bit as much as hardware stores
do!) And so on. If your mindset is
right/encompassing, youll find ways to learn
from anybody and everybody in whatever endeavor.

80
COMPETITORS The best swordsman in the world
doesnt need to fear the second best swordsman in
the world no, the person for him to be afraid
of is some ignorant antagonist who has never had
a sword in his hand before he doesnt do the
thing he ought to do, and so the expert isnt
prepared for him he does the thing he ought not
to do and often it catches the expert out and
ends him on the spot. Mark Twain
81
Diverse groups of problem solversgroups of
people with diverse toolsconsistently
outperformed groups of the best and the
brightest. If I formed two groups, one random
(and therefore diverse) and one consisting of the
best individual performers, the first group
almost always did better. Diversity trumped
ability. Scott Page, The Difference How the
Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms,
Schools, and Societies
82
Id urge you to read the prior slide a couple of
times. Or three times. Or four. (And, of
course, Id urge you to check the book out as
well. Fact is, theres a pretty significant and
growing literature that supports this point in a
variety of settingsincluding the likes of
foreign policy making at the highest levels.)
The notion is profound Diversity per se is
a key, maybe the key, to effective and innovative
decision making. (And pay close attention to the
delusion of greatest group of experts looking at
itsounds good, results not so clear.) Think
about it This idea changes everything.
Truly.
83
Diversity per se is a key maybe the key
to effective and innovative decision making.
84
Whos the most interesting person youve met in
the last 90 days? How do I get in touch with
them? Fred Smith
85
Well now take the innovation-enhancing portfolio
idea to the individual level. FedEx founder
Fred Smith and I were together on an economic
predictions panel, and he turned to me at one
point and popped the questionthat is, the
question on the prior slide about the most
interesting person Id recently met. Im afraid
I didnt have a very good answerwhich bugged me,
not only out of embarrassment but because I
should have been able to reel off a half-dozen
truly interesting people. So imagine you were
asked this question. Right now! How
scintillating would your answer be? (And What a
great question! And In a fashion, key to the
continuing vitality of FedEx in a merciless
market!)
86
Vanity Fair What is your most marked
characteristic? Mike Bloomberg Curiosity.
87
7.
88
The Bottleneck
89
The Bottleneck Is at the Top of the
BottleWhere are you likely to find people
with the least diversity of experience, the
largest investment in the past, and the greatest
reverence for industry dogma At the top!
Gary Hamel/Harvard Business Review
90
8.
91
Theres a fundamental shift in power happening.
Everywhere, people are getting together and,
using the Internet, disrupting whatever
activities theyre involved in. Pierre Omidyar,
founder, eBay
92
The Billion-man Research Team Companies
offering work to online communities are reaping
the benefits of crowdsourcing. Headline, FT
93
(No Transcript)
94
At my blog, tompeters.com, I called this the
Business Book of the Year. Moreover, it
consists of virtually no theory, but, instead
cases after case after pragmatic case.
95
9.
96
14,00020,00030
97
14,000/eBay20,000/Amazon30/Craigslist
98
Unless mankind redesigns itself by changing our
DNA through altering our genetic makeup,
computer-generated robots will take over the
world. Stephen Hawking
99
A bureaucrat is an expensive microchip. Dan
Sullivan, consultant and executive coach
100
In some sense you can argue that the science
fiction scenario is already starting to happen.
The computers are in control. We just live in
their world. Danny Hillis, Thinking Machines
101
Q3 2011/BLS3.1/Non-farm
productivity growth3.8/Non-farm
output0.6/Non-farm hours worked5.4/Manufactur
ing productivity4.7/Manufacturing
output-0.6/Manufacturing hours workedSource
Bureau of Labor Statistics/03 November 2011
102
Kevin Roberts Credo1. Ready.
Fire! Aim.2. If it aint broke ... Break it!3.
Hire crazies.4. Ask dumb questions.5. Pursue
failure.6. Lead, follow ... or get out of the
way!7. Spread confusion.8. Ditch your
office.9. Read odd stuff.10. Avoid moderation!
103
10.
104
25
105
MBWA
106
ManagingBy WanderingAround
107
You Your calendarThe calendar never lies.
108
50
109
Most managers spend a great deal of time
thinking about what they plan to do, but
relatively little time thinking about what they
plan not to do. As a result, they become so
caught up in fighting the fires of the moment
that they cannot really attend to the long-term
threats and risks facing the organization. So the
first soft skill of leadership the hard way is to
cultivate the perspective of Marcus Aurelius
avoid busyness, free up your time, stay focused
on what really matters. Let me put it bluntly
Every leader should routinely keep a substantial
portion of his or her timeI would say as much as
50 percentunscheduled. Only when you have
substantial slop in your scheduleunscheduled
timewill you have the space to reflect on what
you are doing, learn from experience, and recover
from your inevitable mistakes. Leaders without
such free time end up tackling issues only when
there is an immediate or visible problem.
Managers typical response to my argument about
free time is, Thats all well and good, but
there are things I have to do. Yet we waste so
much time in unproductive activityit takes an
enormous effort on the part of the leader to keep
free time for the truly important things. Dov
Frohman ( Robert Howard), Leadership The Hard
Way Why Leadership Cant Be TaughtAnd How You
Can Learn It Anyway (Chapter 5, The Soft Skills
Of Hard Leadership)
110
1
111
If there is any one secret to effectiveness,
it is concentration. Effective executives do
first things first and they do one thing at a
time. Peter Drucker
112
The doctor interrupts after Source
Jerome Groopman, How Doctors Think
113
18
114
18 seconds!
115
An obsession with Listening is ... the ultimate
mark
of Respect. Listening is ... the
heart and soul of Engagement. Listening is ...
the heart and soul of Kindness. Listening is ...
the heart and soul of Thoughtfulness. Listening
is ... the basis for true Collaboration. Listening
is ... the basis for true Partnership. Listening
is ... a Team Sport. Listening is ... a
Developable Individual Skill. (Though women
are far better at it
than men.) Listening is ... the basis for
Community. Listening is ... the bedrock of Joint
Ventures that work. Listening is ... the bedrock
of Joint Ventures that grow. Listening is ... the
core of effective Cross-functional
Communication (Which is in turn
Attribute 1 of
organizational effectiveness.) cont.
116
Listening is ... the engine of superior
EXECUTION. Listening is ... the key to making the
Sale. Listening is ... the key to Keeping the
Customers Business. Listening is ...
Service. Listening is ... the engine of Network
development. Listening is ... the engine of
Network maintenance. Listening is ... the engine
of Network expansion. Listening is ... Social
Networkings secret weapon. Listening is ...
Learning. Listening is ... the sine qua non of
Renewal. Listening is ... the sine qua non of
Creativity. Listening is ... the sine qua non of
Innovation. Listening is ... the core of taking
diverse opinions aboard. Listening is ...
Strategy. Listening is ... Source 1 of
Value-added. Listening is ... Differentiator
1. Listening is ... Profitable. (The R.O.I.
from listening is higher than
from any other single
activity.) Listening is the bedrock which
underpins a Commitment to
EXCELLENCE
117
  • It was much later that I realized Dads secret.
    He gained respect by giving it. He talked and
    listened to the fourth-grade kids in Spring
    Valley who shined shoes the same way he talked
    and listened to a bishop or a college president.
    He was seriously interested in who you were and
    what you had to say.
  • Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect

118
11.
119
Business has to give people enriching, rewarding
lives or it's simply not worth doing.
Richard Branson
120
You have to treat your employees like
customers. Herb Kelleher, upon being asked his
secret to successSource Joe Nocera, NYT,
Parting Words of an Airline Pioneer, on the
occasion of Herb Kellehers retirement after 37
years at Southwest Airlines (SWAs pilots union
took out a full-page ad in USA Today thanking HK
for all he had done) across the way in Dallas,
American Airlines pilots were picketing AAs
Annual Meeting)
121
Herb Kelleher is the founding CEO of that
extraordinary American institution, the
profitable-for-38-years-in-a-row Southwest
Airlines. SWA and its cross-town competitor,
American Airlines, had their annual meetings in
Dallas on the same day a couple of years ago.
Americans meeting was picketed by members of its
pilots union. The SWA meeting celebrated Mr
Kellehers retirement after 37 years. The SWA
pilots unionby way of contrasttook out and paid
for a full-page ad in USA Today thanking Kelleher
for his service!Partial explanation Herb
Kelleher has been asked a thousand times,
probably more, what his success secrets are. Hes
always given the same answer. ONE secret only
You have to treat your employees like
customers. Theres more to it than that, but
Kelleher is adamant about emphasizing just the
one thing.
122
"When I hire someone, that's when I go to work
for them. John DiJulius, "What's the Secret to
Providing a World-class Customer Experience"
123
"If you want staff to give great service, give
great service to staff." Ari Weinzweig,
Zingerman's
124
I love this!(Please take 3 deep breathsand
re-read.)Zingermans is one of the companies
featured in Bo Burlinghams marvelous Small
Giants Companies that Chose to Be Great Instead
of Big. The idea here is a carbon copy of
Kellehers axiom. And this one uses the
wonderword SERVICE. Leader Life Lesson 1
Effective bosses are in service to their
employees! (And they are well aware thereof. And
in fact relish that rolei.e., Servant Leader.)
125
If you want to WOW your customers then you must
first WOW those who WOW the customers!
126
My versions for what its worth.
127
EMPLOYEES FIRST, CUSTOMERS SECOND Turning
Conventional Management Upside Down Vineet
Nayar/CEO/HCL Technologies
128
Oath of Office Managers/Servant
Leaders Our goal is to serve our customers
brilliantly and profitably over the long
haul. Serving our customers brilliantly and
profitably over the long haul is a product of
brilliantly serving, over the long haul, the
people who serve the customer. Hence, our job as
leadersthe alpha and the omega and everything
in betweenis abetting the sustained growth and
success and engagement and enthusiasm and
commitment to Excellence of those, one at a
time, who directly or indirectly serve the
ultimate customer. Weleaders of every
stripeare in the Human Growth and
Development and Success and Aspiration to
Excellence business. We leaders only grow
when they each and every one of our
colleagues are growing. We leaders only
succeed when they each and every one of our
colleagues are succeeding. We leaders
only energetically march toward Excellence when
they each and every one of our colleagues
are energetically marching toward
Excellence. Period.
129
Our MissionTo develop and manage talentto
apply that talent,throughout the world, for the
benefit of clientsto do so in partnership to
do so with profit.WPP
130
Im an unabashed enemy of 9 out of 9.01 mission
statementsthey are such pap (or is it crap?).
But I love this one from the giant London-based
marketing services firm WPP. Profit is indeed
on the agenda. But profit is a DERIVATIVE
CONCEPT.The path to profit unequivocally begins
with the quality of and commitment to talent.
131
The ONE Question In the last year 3 years,
current job, name the three people whose
growth youve most contributed to. Please explain
where they were at the beginning of the year,
where they are today, and where they are heading
in the next 12 months. Please explain in
painstaking detail your development strategy
in each case. Please tell me your biggest
development disappointmentlooking back, could
you or would you have done anything differently?
Please tell me about your greatest development
triumphand disasterin the last five years. What
are the three big things youve learned about
helping people grow along the way?
132
I was talking with a general in the Indian Army.
The topic was promotion to the rank of general
officer. I said, and he pretty much agreed, that
the acid test among the, say, six colonels
contending for one spot at the next level would
be their respective people development track
records. To put numbers to it, as is my want,
Id insist that each of those candidates lay
outin exacting detailthe unexpurgated story of
the three people they have most significantly
helped grow in the last, say, three years. The
confirmed stories of their developed stars
are primary data in determining promotion to
general officer.
133
2/year legacy.
134
To continue, your legacy, as a mid-level or
higher boss, is by and large determined by the
key promotions youve made during your, say, five
years on the job. On average, there are two
such promotions per year. Hence your 10 promotion
decisions in 5 years are the most important
decisions youll make! Doubtless you take
promotion decisions seriously, but do you take
them SERIOUSLY ENOUGH?(Are those promotion
decisions taken as carefully as, say, decisions
to proceed, or not, with major strategic capital
investments/ acquisitions?)
135
Promotion Decisionslife and death
decisionsSource Peter Drucker, The Practice
of Management
136
The Memories
That Matter The people you developed who went on
to stellar accomplishments inside or outside
the company. The (no more than) two or three
people you developed who went on to create
stellar institutions of their own. The longshots
(people with a certain something) you bet on
who surprised themselvesand your peers. The
people of all stripes who 2/5/10/20 years
later say You made a difference in my life,
Your belief in me changed everything. The sort
of/character of people you hired in general. (And
the bad apples you chucked out despite some
stellar traits.) A handful of projects (a half
dozen at most) you doggedly pursued that
still make you smile and which fundamentally
changed the way things are done inside or
outside the company/industry. The supercharged
camaraderie of a handful of Great Teams aiming
to change the world.
137
Les Wexner From sweaters to people! Limited
Brands founder Les Wexner queried on astounding
long-term successsaid, in effect, it happened
because he got as excited about developing
people as he had been about predicting fashion
trends in his early years
138
The leaders of Great Groups love talent
and know where to find it. They revel in the
talent of others. Warren Bennis Patricia
Ward Biederman, Organizing Genius
139
7 Steps to Sustaining Success You take care of
the people. The people take care of the service.
The service takes care of the customer. The
customer takes care of the profit. The profit
takes care of the re-investment. The
re-investment takes care of the re-invention.
The re-invention takes care of the future. (And
at every step the only measure is EXCELLENCE.)
140
7 Steps to Sustaining Success And it starts with
You take care of the people.
141
"Leadership is a gift. It's given by those who
follow. You have to be worthy of it. General
Mark Welsh, Commander, U.S. Air Forces Europe
142
12.
143
If the regimental commander lost most of his 2nd
lieutenants and 1st lieutenants and captains and
majors, it would be a tragedy. If he lost his
sergeants it would be a catastrophe. The Army and
the Navy are fully aware that success on the
battlefield is dependent to an extraordinary
degree on its Sergeants and Chief Petty Officers.
Does industry have the same awareness?
144
Employee retention satisfaction productivity
Overwhelmingly based on the first-line
manager!Source Marcus Buckingham Curt
Coffman, First, Break All the Rules What the
Worlds Greatest Managers Do Differently
145
People leave managers not companies. Dave
Wheeler
146
13.
147
Development can help great people be even
betterbut if I had a dollar to spend, Id spend
70 cents getting the right person in the door.
Paul Russell, Director, Leadership and
Development, Google
148
In short, hiring is the most important aspect
of business and yet remains woefully
misunderstood. Source Wall Street Journal,
10.29.08, review of Who The A Method for
Hiring, Geoff Smart and Randy Street
149
I cant tell you how many times we passed up
hotshots for guys we thought were better people,
and watched our guys do a lot better than the big
names, not just in the classroom, but on the
fieldand, naturally, after they graduated, too.
Again and again, the blue chips faded out, and
our little up-and-comers clawed their way to
all-conference and All-America teams. Bo
Schembechler (and John Bacon), Recruit for
Character, Bos Lasting Lessons
150
In the end, the effective hiring process will
focus on the moral character of the candidates.
Which is not to dismiss the technical skills
requirements but the winning teamthe team that
lastswill more than match those quantifiable
skills with heart and passion and resilience and
integrity. (And in uncertain times like
these, the apparently soft attributes are in
fact the true hard attributes which engender a
culture of organizational Excellence, especially
when the chips are down.) (To state the, I hope,
obviousthis applies to 100 of jobs. Stellar
organizations have no bit players. )
151
14.
152
In the Army, 4-star generals obsess about
training. In most businesses, it's a ho hum
mid-level staff function. and admirals and
symphony conductors and sports coaches and police
chiefs and fire chiefs
153
training, TRAINING and M-O-R-E T-R-A-I-N-I-N-G
CINCPAC Nimitz to CNO King/1943
154
15.
155
The four most important words in any
organization are
156
The four most important words in any
organization are What do you think?
Source courtesy Dave Wheeler, posted at
tompeters.com
157
Employees who don't feel significant rarely make
significant contributions. Mark Sanborn
158
The deepest principal in human nature is the
craving to be appreciated.William
JamesCraving, not wish or desire or
longing Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and
Influence People (The BIG Secret of Dealing With
People)
159
Society is a vehicle for earthly heroism. Man
transcends death bt finding meaning for his life.
It is the burning desire for the creature to
count. What man really fears is not extinction,
but extinction with insignificance. Ernest
Becker, Denial of Death
160
People want to be part of something larger than
themselves. They want to be part of something
theyre really proud of, that theyll fight for,
sacrifice for , trust. Howard Schultz,
Starbucks
161
Could It Be ??? How to Win Friends and
Influence People Dale Carnegie
162
16.
163
A 15-Point Human Capital Asset Development
Manifesto Re-framing Capitalism World Strategy
Forum Seoul/15 June 2012
164
Re-framing Capitalism A 15-Point
Human Capital Development Manifesto 1.
Corporate social responsibility starts at
homei.e., inside the enterprise! MAXIMIZING
GDD/Gross Domestic Development of the workforce
is the primary source of mid-term and beyond
growth and profitabilityand maximizes national
productivity and wealth and security. (Re
profitability If you want to serve the customer
with uniform Excellence, then you must FIRST
effectively and faithfully serve those who serve
the customeri.e. our employees, via maximizing
tools and professional development.)
165
3. Four-star generals and admirals (and
symphony conductors and sports coaches and police
chiefs and fire chiefs) OBSESS about training.
Why is it an almost dead certainty that in a
random 30-minute interview you are unlikely to
hear a CEO touch upon this topic? (I would hazard
a guess that most CEOs see IT investments as a
strategic necessity, but see training expenses
as a necessary evil.) 4. Proposition/axiom
The CTO/Chief TRAINING Officer is arguably the 1
staff job in the enterprise, at least on a par
with, say, the CFO or CIO or head of RD. (Again,
external circumstancessee immediately aboveare
forcing our hand.)
166
7. Every individual on the payroll should have
a benchmarked professional growth strategy. Every
leader at every level should be evaluated in no
small measure on the collective effectiveness of
individual growth strategiesthat is, each
individuals absolute growth is of direct
relevance to every leaders assessed performance.

167
8. Given that we ceaselessly lament the
leadership deficit, it is imperative, and just
plain vanilla common sense, that we maximize the
rate of development of women leaders at every
levellittle if anything has a higher priority.
(It is an outrage that this has not been the case
until nowand is still not the case in far too
many institutions.) (And, while there are no
guarantees, women are more likely dispositionally
to take a shine to the imperative of maximizing
human asset development.)
168
I speak to you with a feminine voice. Its the
voice of democracy, of equality. I am certain,
ladies and gentlemen, that this will be the
womens century. In the Portuguese language,
words such as life, soul, and hope are of the
feminine gender, as are other words like courage
and sincerity, President Dilma Rousseff of
Brazil, 2011, 1st woman opening keynote, United
Nations General Assembly
169
AS LEADERS, WOMEN RULE New Studies find that
female managers outshine their male counterparts
in almost every measure TITLE/ Special
Report/ BusinessWeek
170
Forget China, India and the Internet Economic
Growth Is Driven by Women. Source Headline,
Economist W/28T gt 2X (C I)
171
11. The national education infrastructurefrom
kindergarten to continuing adult educationmay
well be National Priority 1. Moreover, the
educational infrastructure must be altered
radically to underpin support for the creative
jobs that will be more or less the sole basis of
future employment and national growth and wealth
creation.
172
Human creativity is the ultimate economic
resource. Richard Florida
173
APPLE market cap gt Exxon Mobil August
2011
174
17.
175
Excellence. Always. If not Excellence,
what?If not Excellence now, when?
176
Excellence can be obtained if you ...
care more than others think is wise ...
risk more than others think is safe ...
dream more than others think is practical
... expect more than others think is
possible. Source Anon. (Posted _at_ tompeters.com
by K.Sriram, November 27, 2006 117 AM)
177
EXCELLENCE is not an "aspiration. EXCELLENCE
is THE NEXT FIVE MINUTES.
178
EXCELLENCE is a personal choice not an
institutional choice!
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