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Vaccine Communication Skills: How to Speak with Vaccine-Hesitant Parents

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Vaccine Communication Skills: How to Speak with Vaccine-Hesitant Parents & the Media Kris Calvin CEO, AAP-CA The Interview Answer their questions in clear, concise ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Vaccine Communication Skills: How to Speak with Vaccine-Hesitant Parents


1
Vaccine Communication Skills How to Speak with
Vaccine-Hesitant Parents the Media
  • Kris Calvin
  • CEO, AAP-CA

2
Objectives
  • Understand changing concerns of
    vaccine-hesitant families
  • Gain skills best practices for effective
    communication with vaccine hesitant families
  • Become more comfortable skills engaging the
    media on vaccine issues.
  • Understand how these skills translate in the
    advocacy arena (example of AB 2109).

3
Vaccination is the top Public Health achievement
of the 20th Century
MMWR 1999 48241
4
2010 Practicing Pediatricians Top Vaccine
Safety Concerns of Patients/Families
  • Autism
  • Thimerosal
  • Aluminum
  • Pain of so many shots
  • Why so many shots at once/so early? Concern
    about overwhelming
  • the immune system.
  • Have not seen these diseases so do not see the
    value that outweighs any risk

5
2012 Vaccine-educated parents
  • May be pro-vaccine for themselves, but object
    to it for infants/children
  • May no longer believe in a vaccine-autism
    connection (or at least will not say so)
  • Want green vaccinespure, natural (no
    additives)
  • Overwhelming the young immune system 1
    concern, many want alternative schedule

6
More 2012 Parent Concerns
  • General mistrust of scientific research/systems
    of carefunding, motives (per shot payment)
  • My unvaccinated baby is healthier than
    vaccinated children (rosy cheeks)
  • I am fine not caring about public healthmy
    responsibility is MY child only
  • Highly influenced by non-MD providerschiropractor
    s, nurses, midwives/doulas

7
Kindergarten PBEs by County
2000
Lee et al NVIC 2010
8
Do you matter?
9
Do practicing MDs consider it important to
have effective vaccine communication skills?
  • Many spoke to what a huge part of practice
    vaccines have become.
  • Numerous spoke about the importance of these
    skills for both general pediatricians and
    subspecialists.
  • Importance of subspecialist supporting need for
    vaccines, even in cases where they do not give
    the vaccines themselves.
  • Also for many children with special health care
    needs, the subspecialist is the medical home.

10
Why Parents Who Planned To Delay/Refuse Vaccine
Changed Their Minds
Gust et al Pediatr 2009122718
11
How can you respond?
12
(No Transcript)
13
From FFrom Practicing Pediatricians Best
Practices
14
Practicing Pediatricians What I didnt think I
would do or see!
  • Nearly all have learned to negotiate vaccines
    for some families, using slightly modified
    alternate schedules as part of routine
    practice. (This requires diligence,
    documentation and clear communication about
    what is acceptable and what is not. This is NOT
    about substituting a Sears-type schedule for
    science.)
  • Many parents feel it is now due diligence to at
    least question one or more vaccines, even if they
    will readily accept them.
  • MD must deal with own anger/rejection at not
    being trusted over vaccines.

15
Listen first
Ask each family/parent what, if any, are their
concerns about vaccines. Having a prepared
spiel and spouting lots of science without
knowing what someones specific concerns are
wastes time and does not build trust.
16

Assess depth of concern
  • First tier Parents who want to exercise due
    diligence.
  • Second tier One or more specific fears based on
    myths in the media or from friends, that if
    listened to and carefully responded, will set
    aside.
  • Third tier those who are fearful of vaccines
    either due to a close personal experience (a
    sibling whose child had autism after a vaccine,
    or had what they perceived as a bad adverse
    reaction) or who refuse vaccines as part of a
    larger life philosophy.

17

Be ready for your own negative emotions.
  • Doctors need to recognize that they need to
    come to terms with emotions of anger or
    disappointment in parents who listen to
    celebrities or media rather than trained MDs, who
    feel that they know what is best for the child.
    Those emotions move beyond judgment to help the
    patients.

18
(No Transcript)
19

Pre-empt resistance
  • Begin at the first visit letting the family know
    proactively their position as a doctor in strong
    support of vaccines for their child. Give
    websites you trust about vaccines.
  • Share if you vaccinate your own child/ your
    niece, your nephew.

20

Use stories rather than theories
  • Focus on those diseases that are still seen and
    they can understand, and tell stories about
    children who did not get vaccines.

21
Other Lessons Learned
  • Maximize benefits to their child
  • not a public health discussion
  • vaccines provide protection
  • risk of disease for omitted vaccines

22
BOTTOM LINE
  • This is not a debate, it is a conversation. It
    doesnt matter if you are right it matters
    what they want and decide to do.

23
Working With the Media
  • Improving the Value of Medical Journalism
  • ltMedia slides courtesy of Val Ulene, LA Times
    health columnistgt

24
Why Engage the Media
  • As a major source of medical information, the
    media can be particularly important in educating
    the general public, the medical community and
    policy makers.

25
  • Most news articles on medically related topics
    fail to discuss important issues such as evidence
    quality, costs, and risks versus benefits

26
(No Transcript)
27
Barriers to Good Medical Reporting
  • Lack of time
  • Lack of space
  • Lack of knowledge

28
Overcoming Barriers What Can Doctors Do to Help
  • Make yourself available
  • Provide accurate, up-to-date information about
    health-related topics
  • Be professional
  • Tell a good story

29
Should I Do the Interview?
  • Find out what the reporter wants to know and what
    their attitude toward the subject might be
  • Get to know the media outlet
  • Determine if youre the right person to do the
    interview
  • Decide whether its worth your time and energy

30
  • DONT BE AFRAID TO TURN DOWN AN INTERVIEW!

31
Where Do People Get Their News?
32
Use Social Media
  • About a quarter (27) of adults say they
    regularly or sometimes get news or news headlines
    through Facebook, Twitter or other social
    networking sites.
  • This rises to 38 of people younger than 30, but
    now spans a notable share of older Americans (12
    of those 65 and older) as well.

33
Preparing for interviews
  • Bring the journalist up to speed
  • Get yourself up to speed
  • Prepare and practice key message points
  • Review facts and figures
  • Identify questions (easy, hard and terrible) and
    formulate responses

34
The Interview
  • Answer their questions in clear, concise, simple
    language
  • Stick to what you know
  • Take charge
  • Take a stance
  • Be enthusiastic!

35
Avoid Getting Trapped
  • Stay calm and positive
  • Dont pretend to know something you dont know
  • Correct inaccurate information
  • If you make an error, correct yourself as soon as
    possible
  • Theres no such thing as off the record

36
Follow-up After an Interview
  • Ask if youll have the opportunity to review and
    correct the piece
  • Make yourself available for follow-up questions

37
Dont Wait for Them to Call You!
  • Send press releases
  • Invite to press conferences
  • Provide them with information kits
  • Reach out to personal contacts
  • Submit letters to the editors
  • Write spec articles

38
Not for today--AB 2109 (PAN) PBES
  • REQUIRES HEALTH CARE PROVIDER SIGNATURE FOR PBE
  • INTENDED TO DECREASE CONVENIENCE PBES WHILE STILL
    PERMITTING PARENTAL CHOICE
  • BASED ON WASHINGTON STATE LAW SHOWING RESULTS
  • LOW BURDEN TO MD PRACTICESFAX/EMAIL OK FEW
    PATIENTS PER PRACTICE

39
THANK YOU!
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