Co-Admission Programs: The Role of Academic Advising Student Success and Retention Conference February 8, 2008 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Co-Admission Programs: The Role of Academic Advising Student Success and Retention Conference February 8, 2008

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The Role of Academic Advising Student Success and Retention Conference February 8, 2008 Cathleen L. Smith, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology Portland State University – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Co-Admission Programs: The Role of Academic Advising Student Success and Retention Conference February 8, 2008


1
Co-Admission ProgramsThe Role of Academic
Advising Student Success and Retention
Conference February 8, 2008
  • Cathleen L. Smith, Ph.D.
  • Professor of Psychology
  • Portland State University
  • smithc_at_pdx.edu
  • Janine M. Allen, Ph.D.
  • Professor of Education
  • Portland State University
  • allenj_at_pdx.edu

2
History of Co-Admission Programs at PSU
  • In the 1990s PSU Office of Institutional Research
    Planning (OIRP) reported that community college
    transfer students were retained at a lower rate
    than native freshmen
  • Research in 1990s found swirling enrollment
    patterns

3
Co-Admission Programs
  • Co-Admission agreements
  • 1997 Clackamas Community College
  • 1998 Mount Hood Community College
  • 2000 Portland Community College
  • 2002 Chemeketa Community College
  • Provided
  • Dual enrollment
  • Financial aid
  • Academic advising and support
  • Access to other resources

4
PSU OIRP Reports thatCo-Admitted Students are
More Successful
  • Compared to other CC Transfer Students,
    Co-Admitted Students
  • Are more likely to have declared a major
  • Are less likely to change their major
  • Are more likely to be retained and graduate from
    PSU

5
Purpose of the Present Study
  • To better understand the processes that
    contribute to the higher success rate of
    co-admitted students
  • Specifically, to investigate the role academic
    advising might play

6
Research Questions
  • Are co-admitted students more likely than other
    community college transfer students to
  • Be receiving advice?
  • Consider advising important?
  • Be satisfied with the advising they receive?
  • Score higher on predictors of retention?

7
Method
  • On-line survey of admitted enrolled students
  • Administered during on-line registration for
    spring term 2005 2006
  • 539 community college transfer students responded
  • (158 co-admitted and 381 not co-admitted)
  • Survey responses merged with data from the
    Student Information System

8
Research Question 1
  • Are co-admitted students more likely than other
    community college transfer students to be
    receiving advice?
  • Which of the following best describes where at
    PSU you get your PRIMARY academic advising?
  • I am not currently getting academic advice from
    faculty or staff at PSU

9
Results of Research Question 1
  • 26.6 of co-admitted students were not receiving
    advice vs. 21.5 of other community college
    transfer students
  • The difference was not statistically significant

10
Research Questions 2 3
  • Are co-admitted students more likely than other
    community college transfer students to
  • Consider advising important?
  • Be satisfied with the advising they receive?

11
Advising FunctionsAcademic advising that helps
students
  • Integration (Holistic Advising)
  • Connect their academic, career, and life goals
    (overall connect)
  • Choose among courses in the major that connect
    their academic, career, and life goals (major
    connect).
  • Choose among various general education options
    that connect their academic, career, and life
    goals (gen ed connect)

12
Advising FunctionsAcademic advising that helps
students
  • Integration (Holistic Advising) (contd.)
  • Decide what kind of degree to pursue in order to
    connect their academic, career, and life goals
    (degree connect)
  • Choose out-of-class activities that connect their
    academic, career, and life goals (out-of-class
    connect)

13
Advising FunctionsAdvising that refers students,
when they need it
  • Referral
  • To campus resources that address academic
    problems (referral academic)
  • To campus resources that address non-academic
    problems (referral non-academic)

14
Advising FunctionsAcademic advising that
  • Information
  • Assists students with understanding how things
    work at this university (how things work)
  • Gives students accurate information about degree
    requirements (accurate information)

15
Advising FunctionsAcademic advising that
  • Individuation
  • Takes into account students' skills, abilities,
    and interests in helping them choose courses
    (skills, abilities, interests)
  • Involves knowing the student as an individual
    (know as individual)

16
Advising FunctionsAcademic advising that
  • Shared Responsibility
  • Encourages students to assume responsibility for
    their education by helping them develop planning,
    problem-solving, and decision-making skills
    (shared responsibility)

17
Measures of Advising Functions
  • Six point Likert-type Scales
  • How important is this advising function to you?
  • 1 Not Important
  • 6 Very Important
  • How satisfied are you with the advising you
    receive on this function?
  • 1 Not Satisfied
  • 6 Very Satisfied

18
Results of Research Question 2Importance Ratings
19
Results of Research Question 3Satisfaction
Ratings
20
Research Question 4
  • Are co-admitted students more likely than other
    community college transfer students to score
    higher on predictors of retention?

21
Predictors of Retention Goal Commitment
  • Its important for me to graduate from college
    (Graduate College)
  • I have a plan to achieve my educational goals
    (Educational Plan)

22
Predictors of Retention Institutional Commitment
  • I plan to graduate from PSU (Graduate PSU)
  • I am confident that I made the right decision in
    choosing to attend PSU (Right Decision)

23
Other Retention Predictors
  • I have had at least one relationship with a
    faculty or staff member at PSU that has had a
    significant and positive influence on me
    (Significant Relationship)
  • Overall, I am satisfied with my educational
    experience at PSU (Overall Satisfaction)

24
Results of Research Question 4Predictors of
Retention1strongly disagree 6strongly agree
25
So What Explains the Greater Success of
Co-Admitted Students?
  • Selection bias
  • Are students who are attracted to the
    co-admission programs more likely to be
    successful under any circumstances?

26
Astin's Model of College Impact(I-E-O Model)
27
Variation on I-E-O Model
28
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29
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30
Post Hoc Research Question
  • Are the characteristics of co-admitted students
    different from those of other CC transfer
    students?

31
Results of Post Hoc Research Question
  • Compared to other CC Transfers, Co-Admits are
    more likely to (Co-admits vs. Other CC
    transfers)
  • Be female (68.4 vs. 56.4)
  • Have high financial need (53.8 vs. 42.8)
  • Have low SES (76.6 vs. 68.8)
  • Spend less time socializing and relaxing and
    more time caring for dependents
  • (plt.05, plt.01)

32
Results of Post Hoc Research Question
  • But not significantly more likely to
  • (Co-admits vs. Other CC transfers)
  • Be a 1st generation college student (60.5 vs.
    51.7)
  • Speak a language other than English at home
    (19.2 vs. 15.2)
  • Be older (31 vs. 29 years old)

33
Summary of Our Results
  • Co-admitted students experiences with, and
    attitudes about, advising do not differ from
    other CC transfer students
  • But co-admitted students have more risk factors
    associated with non persistence toward degree
    completion
  • High financial need
  • Low SES
  • Dependent care

34
Discussion
  • How do we account for the results reported here
    in light of previous findings showing that
    co-admitted students are retained at a higher
    rate than other CC students?

35
One Possible Explanation
  • Co-admission may be an equalizing process that
    counterbalances the negative effects associated
    with risk factors
  • Without the co-admission program these students
    may be less likely to get advising, score lower
    on the predictors of retention and be retained at
    a lower rate

36
Further Questions
  • If it is not through advising that co-admission
    improves the retention rate of transfer students,
    what is the critical process?
  • Why and how do these high risk students access
    the co-admission programs?
  • What is it that the co-admission program does
    that mitigates these risk factors?
  • Would we find this same pattern of results at
    other institutions?

37
  • Thank you!
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