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Developing bilingual learning strategies in mainstream and community contexts (ESRC-funded study 2006-07)

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Developing bilingual learning strategies in mainstream and community contexts (ESRC-funded study 2006-07) Charmian Kenner, Salman Al-Azami, Eve Gregory, Mahera Ruby – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Developing bilingual learning strategies in mainstream and community contexts (ESRC-funded study 2006-07)


1
Developing bilingual learning strategies in
mainstream and community contexts (ESRC-funded
study 2006-07)
  • Charmian Kenner, Salman Al-Azami, Eve Gregory,
    Mahera Ruby
  • Department of Educational Studies, Goldsmiths
    College London

2
Bilingual learning aspects to investigate
  • Transfer of concepts (Cummins, 1984)
  • Translation/interpretation (Creese, 2004)
  • Linking with cultural worlds (Martin-Jones
    Saxena, 2003)
  • Increasing knowledge about how language works
    (Bialystok, 2001)
  • Learner identities (Cummins, 1996 Creese, Bhatt,
    Bhojani Martin, 2006)

3
The research context
  • Two primary schools in Tower Hamlets, East London
  • Second/third generation British Bangladeshi
    children, mostly more fluent in English than
    Sylheti/Bengali (Bangla)
  • Children also attend community classes in Bengali
    and/or Arabic
  • Achieving highly at primary school
  • Sois bilingual learning in mainstream school
    relevant or necessary?

4
The childrens views
5
(No Transcript)
6
Participant children
  • School A
  • Year 2 (age 7)
  • 4 children
  • Year 4 (age 9)
  • 5 children
  • School B
  • Year 2 (age 7)
  • 4 children
  • Year 6 (age 11)
  • 4 children

7
Methodology action research
  • Observe children in community class
  • Plan bilingual tasks in literacy and numeracy
    for each group, relevant to
    mainstream curriculum, linking with community
    class learning
  • Involve community and mainstream teachers in
    planning
  • Children do task, watch video and comment
    (stimulated recall)
  • Discuss data with teachers at end-of-term seminar
  • Repeat process in second term

8
Year 6 studying a chora (Bengali poem)
9
Aspects of learning
  • Bengali literary heritage poem contains
    metaphor and imagery, also known to children as
    lullaby
  • Teacher keen to work on comparative literature
    compare with lullaby in English
  • Involve parents to understand poem more deeply
  • Use Reciprocal Reading strategy to share findings
    in group

10
The chora transliterated and translated
  • Aai aai chad mama Come come uncle moon
  •   
  • aai aai chad mama tip die ja 
  • Come come uncle moon and touch the forehead 
  • chader kopale chad tip die ja
  • Moon come and touch the forehead of the moon  
  • dhan banle kuro debo
  • When the rice is made will give you the husk 
  • mach katle muro debo
  • When the fish is cut will give you the head 
  • kalo gaer dudh debo
  • Will give you the milk of the black cow 
  • dudh khabar bati debo
  • Will give you the bowl for the milk 
  • chader kopale chad tip die ja
  • Moon come and touch the forehead of the moon
  •  

11
Lullaby in English
  • Hush, Little Baby
  • Hush, little baby, dont say a word,
  • Papas gonna buy you a mockingbird.
  • And if that mockingbird dont sing,
  • Papas gonna buy you a diamond ring.
  • And if that diamond ring turns to brass,
  • Papas gonna buy you a looking glass.
  • And if that looking glass gets broke,
  • Papas gonna buy you a billy goat.
  • And if that billy goat wont pull,
  • Papas gonna buy you a cart and bull.
  • And if that cart and bull fall down,
  • Youll still be the sweetest little baby in town.

12
Questions for parents
13
Comparison Venn diagram
14
Reciprocal Reading
  • Sharing findings from parent interviews
  • Each child took a role (eg questioner,
    summariser)
  • Children added to or amended information from
    interviews
  • Clarified their understanding of the chora
  • Took place entirely in English why?

15
Further development
  • Rhythm of poems, using drums
  • Writing own poem with support from Nasima
    (Teaching Assistant)
  • Creating bilingual display for school foyer

16
The childrens poem
  • Fruits
  • We get mangoes and jackfruits in summer
  • White berries, black berries,
  • Black grapes, green grapes,
  • Yellow-coloured ripe bananas,
  • Green-coloured tender bananas,
  • Sour berries, sweet berries,
  • Taste very sweet.

17
Conceptual transfer
  • Understanding metaphor and imagery through
    working in more than one language
  • Not straightforward transfer of similar concept
  • Clarification of complex ideas through discussion

18
Translation/interpretation
  • Transliteration as translation
  • Gives children and teacher access to chora
  • Enables children to express ideas in writing
  • Bridge between Sylheti and Standard Bengali
  • Interlingual and intralingual
  • Translation between phonic systems

19
Linking with cultural worlds
  • Learning more about own culture
  • Texts include different aspects of childrens
    experience Bangla/school/popular culture
  • Venn diagram highlights differences in cultural
    values / economic contexts
  • Own poem combines knowledge from UK and Bangladesh

20
Learner identities
  • Children actively seeking connection to
    Bangladesh through culture and language
  • Terms linking to home experience chad mama
  • Teacher perceiving children as bilingual learners
  • Multiple identities can be expressed at school
    otherwise a monolingual space

21
Childrens comments on doing maths in Bangla
  • You understand more (if you use both languages) 
  • It was different in English you know what you
    have to do
  • We'd like to know more about Bangla numbers and
    operations....how to say it 
  • Just liked it because it was different, liked it,
    liked it 
  •  You can learn in two different ways
  •  And it's our mother tongue and we don't know
    much about it

22
The crucial role of the mainstream school in
supporting language maintenance
  • 2nd and 3rd generation children in Miami are
    losing their Spanish competence unless they are
    schooled in Spanish despite living in a
    substantial Latino community where Spanish is
    regularly used in the business and social
    infrastructure
  • (Eilers, Pearson and Cobo-Lewis, 2006)

23
References
  • Cummins, J. (1984) Language proficiency,
    bilingualism and academic achievement. Chapter 6
    in Bilingualism and Special Education. Clevedon,
    Avon Multilingual Matters.
  • Creese, A. (2004) Bilingual teachers in
    mainstream secondary classrooms using Turkish
    for curriculum learning. International Journal of
    Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 7 (2),
    189-203.
  • Martin-Jones, M. and Saxena, M. (2003) Bilingual
    resources and funds of knowledge for teaching
    and learning in multi-ethnic classrooms in
    Britain. International Journal of Bilingual
    Education and Bilingualism 6 (3), 267-282.
  • Bialystok, E. (2001) Bilingualism in Development
    Language, Literacy and Cognition. Cambridge
    Cambridge University Press.
  • Cummins, J. (1996) Negotiating Identities
    Education for Empowerment in a Diverse Society.
    Ontario, CA California Association for Bilingual
    Education.
  • Creese, A., Bhatt, A., Bhojani, N. and Martin, P.
    (2006) Multicultural, heritage and learner
    identities in complementary schools. Language and
    Education 20 (1), 23-43.
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