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The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE)

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Title: The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE)


1
The Community College Survey of Student
Engagement (CCSSE)
  • Pilot Test Results (Fall 2001)
  • May 6, 2003
  • Expanded Deans Council

2
CCSSE (cessie)
  • Provides a new focus on educational practices
    that research shows are related to student
    success
  • Conducted out of the University of Texas at
    Austin
  • Supported by grants from The Pew Charitable
    Trusts and the Lumina Foundation for Education
  • Patterned after NSSE (nessie) conducted out of
    Indiana University

3
CCSSE Pilot Institutions and Numbers
  • Pilot Targeted Actual Response
  • Institution Sample Sample Rate
  • Butler County CC 825 514 62.3
  • Cascadia CC 625 445 71.2
  • CC of Denver 1,125 536 47.6
  • Central Piedmont CC 825 981 118.9
  • Hocking College 825 713 86.4
  • Johnson County CC 1,125 445 39.6
  • Kingsborough CC 1,125 1,049 93.2
  • Kirkwood CC 1,125 1,021 90.8
  • Montgomery College 825 447 54.2
  • Richland CC 1,125 826 73.4
  • Schoolcraft College 1,125 712 63.3
  • Sinclair CC 1,125 600 53.3
  • Total 11,800 8,289 70.2

4
Procedures
  • CPCC sent UT our class schedule electronically
  • They selected sections including developmental
    courses and a variety of classes at each campus
  • They provided us a list of selected sections and
    an alternate list (in case the original list
    needed subs)
  • Planning and Research staff went to each selected
    classroom and distributed, monitored and
    collected the data over a three week period in
    Fall 2001
  • Data were returned to UT for analysis
  • UT returned the summarized data to the College in
    2002

5
Findings - Demographics
  • CPCC Respondents University
  • Sample (all institutions) Students
    (NSSE)
  • Gender
  • Male 41.2 44.0 44
  • Female 58.8 56 56
  • Race
  • White 57.0 61.5 70
  • Asian 4.6 5.2 6
  • Latino 4.9 8.8 6
  • Black 17.6 9.3 10
  • Nat. Amer. 3.8 .4 1
  • Intl 11.1 8.5 3
  • Other 4.7 6.7 na
  • Enrollment Status
  • Full-time 39.4 31.5 79
  • Part-time 60.6 68.5 21

6
What was learned from the entire group
  • Almost 80 have home computers with Internet
    connections
  • 20 have access at work and 70 have on-campus
    access
  • Only 65 use the Internet at least weekly for
    class projects or assignments
  • 47 use it several times a week
  • 30 use it often or very often

7
Learned continued
  • 56 do not receive financial support from parents
  • 55 do not receive grants or scholarships
  • 75 have no student loans
  • 40 claim paying for college is a significant
    issue
  • 45 report that their colleges provide the
    financial support they need to afford their
    education

8
Students at-risk of not attaining their
educational goals
  • Community college students are 3-4 times more
    likely to reflect the factors that research
    indicates put them at-risk. Those are
  • Being academically under-prepared
  • Being a single parent
  • Being financially independent
  • Caring for children at home
  • Working more than 30 hours a week
  • Being a first-generation college student
  • Being a part-time student
  • Identifying the cost of attending college as a
    significant issue

9
At-risk Students
  • 25 of CCSSE respondents fell in the low risk
    category (0-1 risk factors)
  • 66 were moderate risk students (2-4 risk
    factors)
  • 9 were high-risk (5 or more risk factors)

10
High-risk students
  • Are less likely to set transferring to a
    four-year institution as a primary goal
  • Are more likely to set completing their associate
    degree as a primary goal
  • Are exerting more effort to succeed (they are
    overcoming significant challenge to attend
    college)
  • Are much less likely to come to class prepared
  • More likely to ask questions and participant in
    class discussions
  • Are more likely to prepare two or more drafts of
    a paper or assignment before turning it in

11
High-risk students
  • Are more likely to report that they work harder
    than they thought they could to meet an
    instructors expectations
  • Are more likely to find exams challenging
  • Are more dedicated to studying
  • Are taking advantage of services offered by the
    college
  • Are more likely to give high ratings to the
    importance of tutoring, financial aid, career
    counseling, etc.
  • Are more likely to participate in study-skills
    classes, orientation and organized learning
    communities

12
At-risk Students
  • Community Colleges are doing a good job of
    motivating and serving these students
  • Ensuring the success of these students remains
    one of the critical challenges for community
    colleges
  • Assisting these students may be one of our most
    significant potential contributions to our
    community

13
Section IActivities in the Classroom
  • Students were asked how often they participated
    in various activities in the classroom
  • Scale 1 never, 2 occasionally, 3 often and
    4 very often
  • Data for CPCC are compared to the CC sample and
    to the university sample (NSSE)

14
College Activities
  • CPCC CC NSSE
  • 1. Asking questions in class/contributing
  • to the discussion 2.94 2.81 2.79
  • 2. Made a class presentation 2.05 2.03
    2.17
  • 3. Preparing two or more drafts of a
  • paper before turning it in 2.47 2.54
    2.70
  • 4. Working on a paper that requires
  • integrating ideas or information
  • from various sources 2.57 2.64 3.01
  • 5. Coming to class without completing
  • reading or assignments 1.97 2.01
    2.10

Comparisons 981 CPCC students, 8,289
community college students and 33,000
first-year university students
15
College Activities
  • CPCC CC NSSE
  • 6. Working with other students on
  • projects during class 2.55 2.59 2.42
  • 7. Working with classmates outside of
  • class to prepare assignments 1.88 1.92
    2.35
  • 8. Teaching/tutoring other students 1.48
    1.42 1.63
  • 9. Participating in a community-based
  • project as part of a regular course 1.35
    1.33 1.37
  • 10. Using list-serves, chat rooms or the
  • Internet to discuss or complete 2.14 2.07
    2.58
  • an assignment

16
College Activities
  • CPCC CC NSSE
  • 11. Used email to communicate with
  • the instructor 2.07 1.91 2.77
  • 12. Discussed grades or assignments with
  • an instructor 2. 65 2.43
    2.56
  • 13. Talked about career plans with an
  • instructor or advisor 2.06 1.98
    2.11
  • 14. Discussing ideas from readings/lecture
  • with the instructor outside of class 1.85
    1.72 1.74
  • 15. Receiving prompt feedback from an
  • instructor on your performance
    2.69 2.58 2.61

17
College Activities
  • CPCC CC NSSE
  • 16. Working hard to meet an instructors
  • expectation 2.54 2.47
    2.58
  • 17. Worked with instructors on activities other
  • than coursework 1.42 1.42 1.51
  • 18. Discussed ideas from your readings or
  • classes with others outside of
    class. 2.71 2.61 2.73
  • 19. Having serious conversation with
  • students of a different race/ethnicity
    2.61 2.39 2.65
  • 20. Having serious conversation with students
  • of different religions, political opinions
  • or personal values 2.53 2.41 2.90

18
Students have multiple demands on their time and
spend limited time on campus. Results indicate
that most student-faculty interaction takes place
in class. More than 80 of students do not
participate in college sponsored extracurricular
activities. Therefore, the most powerful
engagement strategies likely will center around
classroom and classwork.
19
Impact Part-time Students
  • Part-time students are least engaged
  • 45 of part-time students (and 29 of full-time
    students) never worked with classmates outside of
    class to prepare assignments
  • 51 of part-time students (and 39 of full-time
    students never discussed ideas from readings or
    classes with an instructor outside of class.
  • Research shows that these interactions lead to
    improved learning and higher retention rates

20
Impact on Transfer Students
  • These classroom activities may impact the
    progress of our transfer students
  • Community college students rated their
    interaction with faculty both in and out of class
    higher than university students
  • However, they ranked interaction with other
    students lower than university students

21
College Activities - Developmental vs.
Non-Developmental
  • Non-dev. Developmental
  • CPCC Nat. CPCC Nat.
  • 1. Asking questions in class/contributing 2.97
    2.81 2.92 2.81
  • to the discussion
  • 2. Made a class presentation 1.93 1.98 2.17
    2.08
  • 3. Preparing two or more drafts of a
  • paper before turning it in 2.23 2.40 2.71
    2.69
  • 4. Working on a paper that requires
  • integrating ideas or information 2.46
    2.58 2.68 2.70
  • from various sources
  • 5. Coming to class without completing 1.97
    2.03 1.97 1.99
  • reading or assignments

22
College Activities - Developmental vs.
Non-Developmental
  • Non-dev. Developmental CPCC
    Nat. CPCC Nat.
  • 6. Working with other students on 2.49
    2.54 2.61 2.64
  • projects during class
  • 7. Working with classmates outside of
  • class to prepare assignments 1.80 1.89 1.96
    1.95
  • 8. Teaching/tutoring other students 1.51
    1.41 1.45 1.43
  • 9. Participating in a community-based
  • project as part of a regular course 1.30
    1.29 1.41 1.36
  • 10. Using list-serves, chat rooms or the
  • Internet to discuss or complete 2.11
    2.04 2.18 2.10
  • an assignment

23
College Activities - Developmental vs.
Non-Developmental
  • Non-dev. Developmental
    CPCC Nat. CPCC Nat.
  • 11. Used email to communicate
  • with the instructor 2.04 1.88 2.10 1.94
  • 12. Discussed grades of assignments
  • with an instructor 2.59 2.37 2.70
    2.49
  • 13. Talked about career plans with an
  • instructor or advisor 2.00 1.89 2.12
    2.07
  • 14. Discussing ideas from readings/lecture
  • with the instructor outside of class 1.83
    1.68 1.87 1.77
  • 15. Receiving prompt feedback from an
  • instructor on your performance 2.70
    2.56 2.68 2.60

24
College Activities - Developmental vs.
Non-Developmental
  • Non-dev. Developmental CPCC
    Nat. CPCC Nat.
  • 16. Working hard to meet an instructors
  • expectation 2.40 2.37 2.68 2.60
  • 17. Worked with instructors on activities
  • other than coursework 1.36 1.39 1.47
    1.44
  • 18. Discussed ideas from your readings or
  • classes with others outside of class. 2.68
    2.55 2.74 2.66
  • 19. Having serious conversation with
  • students of a different race/ethnicity 2.57
    2.34 2.66 2.44
  • 20. Having serious conversation with
  • students of different religions, 2.52
    2.38 2.53 2.45
  • political opinions or or personal values

25
Mental Activities in the Classroom
  • Students were asked about how often they
    participated in a list of mental activities in
    the classroom
  • Activities such as memorizing facts, analytical
    skills, critical thinking, and application of new
    skills or information

26
Mental Activities by Comparison
(n/a)
27
Mental Activities by ComparisonDevelopmental vs.
Non-developmental
28
Mental Activities by Comparison1-30 hours vs.
31 hours
29
Student Opinions About School
  • Students were asked
  • Does the college provide the support you need to
    help you succeed at this college, encourages
    contact among students from different economic,
    social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds, helps
    you cope with your non-academic responsibilities
    (work, family, etc.), encourages you to spend
    significant amounts of time studying and
    providing the financial support needed.
  • Scale 1very little, 2some, 3quite a
    lot, 4very much

30
Student Opinions About School
(n/a)
31
How Students Spend Their Time
  • Community College students are older
  • They work
  • Have families
  • Take care of dependents
  • Dont have a lot of time to spend on campus
  • Dont spend as much time hanging out before and
    after class

32
Weekly Activities
  • Students were asked about how many hours in a
    typical 7-day week do you spend doing the
    following
  • 0 none
  • 1 5 or fewer
  • 2 6-10 hours
  • 3 11-15 hours
  • 4 16-20 hours
  • 5 21-25 hours
  • 6 26-30 hours
  • 7 more than 30 hours

33
Students Weekly Activities
  • How many hours per week do you do the following
  • CPCC CC Sample NSSE
  • Preparing for class 1.88 1.92 4.08
  • Working on campus .15 .25 1.61
  • Working off campus 3.13 2.82 2.35
  • Participating in college
  • sponsored activities .23 .26 2.32

34
Students Weekly Activities
  • How many hours per week do you do the following
  • CPCC CC Sample NSSE
  • Relaxing/socializing 1.97 2.18 4.12
  • Providing care for dependents 1.41 1.36 1.58
  • Commuting to and from
  • classes 1.36 1.28 na
  • Participating in community/
  • campus organizations .82 .61 na

35
Relationships at the College
  • How would you characterize the quality of
    relationships?
  • 1unfriendly, unsupportive, sense of alienation
  • 7friendly, supportive, sense of belonging
  • Quality of Relationships
  • CPCC CC Sample NSSE
  • With other students 5.41 5.39 5.69
  • With Instructors 5.67 5.51 5.39
  • With administrative personnel
  • and offices 4.89 4.89 4.90

36
Knowledge, Skills and Personal Growth
  • To what extent has your experience at this
    college contributed to your knowledge, skills and
    personal development in the following areas?
  • Scale 1 very little
  • 2 some
  • 3 quite a bit
  • 4 very much

37
Educational and Personal Growth
CPCC CC NSSE Acquiring a broad general

education 2.91 2.87 3.09 Acquiring
job/work-related
knowledge/skill 2.62 2.51 2.52 Writing
clearly/effectively 2.61 2.64 2.85 Speaking
clearly/effectively 2.54 2.54 2.59 Thinking
critically/analytically 2.87 2.84 3.09 Solving
numerical problems 2.58 2.51 Using
computing and
information technology 2.58 2.51
2.73 Working effectively with others 2.67 2.69 2
.82
38
Educational and Personal Growth
CPCC CC NSSE Voting in local, state
or college
elections 1.66 1.62 1.94 Learning
effectively on your own 2.78 2.73
2.97 Understanding yourself 2.56 2.53
2.87 Understanding people of other
racial/ ethnic
backgrounds 2.45 2.36 2.58 Developing a
personal code of
values/ethics 2.18 2.20 2.64
Contributing to the welfare of
your
community 1.85 1.79 2.15 Developing clearer
career goals 2.68 2.63 na Gaining
information about career
opportunities 2.58 2.54 na
39
Retention What issues would force you to
withdraw from this college?
Moving/relocating
Lack of finances
Change in career plans
Educational goals change
Working full-time
Caring for dependents
Academically unprepared
Mismatch w/ coll. obj.
All community college students
40
Student Engagement
  • Critical to retention and student success
  • Occurs in student services (counseling, advising,
    financial aid, etc.)
  • Occurs in the classroom (class participation,
    bonding with students and faculty)
  • Occurs through process policies that encourage
    students to stay and dont make it easy for them
    to leave

41
Findings
  • CPCC as a whole, did better on the assessment
    than most of the community colleges who
    participated
  • This opened the opportunity for a Met Life grant
    for us
  • Looking at the differences between our classroom
    activities and those of the university may help
    us better understand transfer issues

42
What the Universities Learned from NSSE
  • Campus Climate
  • Students who report that their school encourages
    contact with peers from different backgrounds
    also see their school as supporting
  • Their academic success
  • Their coping with other responsibilities
  • Their social needs

43
What the Universities Learned continued
  • Supportive Faculty Members
  • Students who report that their faculty members
    are accessible and supportive perceive that their
    school
  • Provides the support they need for their academic
    success
  • Helps them cope with non-academic
    responsibilities
  • Provides social support

44
What the Universities Learned. continued
  • Good Academic Advising
  • Students who report getting high quality academic
    advising
  • Are more likely than their peers to interact with
    faculty members
  • Perceive their institutions environment is
    academically and socially supportive
  • Are more satisfied with their overall college
    experience

45
Two websites
  • http//www.indiana.edu/nsse
  • http//www.ccsse.org

46
The End
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