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Universities of the Future: Implications from Technology

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Universities of the Future: Implications from Technology David G. Brown, VP & Dean (ICCEL) Professor of Economics, Provost (1990-98) http ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Universities of the Future: Implications from Technology


1
Universities of the FutureImplications from
Technology
  • David G. Brown, VP Dean (ICCEL)
    Professor of Economics, Provost
    (1990-98) http//www.wfu.edu/brown
    brown_at_wfu.edu
  • _at_ James Madison University
  • February 18, 2000

All Together One
2
Agenda for the Day
  • 900 AM Demonstration re the Use of Technology
    in My Own Classes
  • 1000 AM Address on Universities of the Future
    Implications From Technology
  • Noon Highlights Informal Discussion
  • 130 PM Strategies for Introducing Technology
    Into Teaching Without Endangering Traditional
    Strengths

3
(No Transcript)
4
THE WAKE FOREST PLAN
Fresh/Junior Computer F99 IBM 390, 128 RAM 333
Mhz, 6GB CD-ROM, 56 modem
Soph/Senior Computer IBM 380XD, 64 RAM, 233
Mhz, 4.1GB, CD-ROM, 56 modem
  • Plan for 2000
  • Thinkpads for all
  • Printers for all
  • New Every 2 Years
  • Own _at_ Graduation
  • Wire Everything
  • Standard Software
  • Full Admin Systems
  • IGN for Faculty
  • 4030 New People
  • 75 Faculty Trained
  • 85 CEI Users
  • 98 E-Mail
  • 15 Tuition
  • 1500/Yr/Student
  • 4 Year Phase In
  • Pilot Year, Now 4 Classes

5
FIRST YEAR SEMINARThe Economists Way of
Thinking
  • To understand a liberal arts education as an
    opportunity to study with professors who think by
    their own set of concepts
  • To learn how to apply economic concepts
  • To learn how to work collaboratively
  • To learn computer skills
  • To improve writing and speaking

Students 15 All Freshmen Required Course
6
Browns First Year Seminar
  • Before Class
  • Video Text Self Tests
  • Best URLs with Criteria
  • Interactive exercises
  • Lecture Notes in PP
  • E-mail dialogue
  • Cybershows
  • During Class
  • One Minute Quiz
  • Computer Tip Talk
  • Class Polls
  • Team Projects
  • After Class
  • Edit Drafts by Team
  • Guest Editors
  • Hyperlinks Pictures
  • Access Previous Papers
  • Lecture Summary w Audio
  • Other
  • Daily Announcements
  • Team Web Page
  • Personal Portfolios
  • Exams include Computer
  • Materials Forever

7
(No Transcript)
8
THE WAKE FOREST PLAN
Fresh/Junior Computer F99 IBM 390, 128 RAM 333
Mhz, 6GB CD-ROM, 56 modem
Soph/Senior Computer IBM 380XD, 64 RAM, 233
Mhz, 4.1GB, CD-ROM, 56 modem
  • Plan for 2000
  • Thinkpads for all
  • Printers for all
  • New Every 2 Years
  • Own _at_ Graduation
  • Wire Everything
  • Standard Software
  • Full Admin Systems
  • IGN for Faculty
  • 4030 New People
  • 75 Faculty Trained
  • 85 CEI Users
  • 98 E-Mail
  • 15 Tuition
  • 1500/Yr/Student
  • 4 Year Phase In
  • Pilot Year, Now 4 Classes

9
Consequences for Wake Forest
  • SAT Scores Class Ranks
  • Retention Grad Rates
  • Satisfaction Learning
  • Faculty Recruitment

10
Impact of Technology Upon the University of the
Future
  • Consolidators Distributors
  • Few Solo Producers (finish carpenters)
  • Limited Number of Producing Sites (textbooks)
  • Many Teaching Institutional Collaboratives
    (banking)
  • Globalization
  • Multimedia Delivery
  • Different Strokes for Different Folks
  • Todays students learn differently (nintendo)

11
University of the Future
  • 80-20 Standard the Resident-Distance Student
  • Most respected courses in 80-20 range
  • Most productive curricula in 80-20 range
  • Interactive Learning
  • Response of the Most Wired
  • Customized and Individualized
  • E.g. Double Jeopardy Quizzes

12
University of the Future
  • Continuous Teaching (and Students)
  • Between Class interaction
  • Before class exercises
  • After graduation exchanges
  • Teams
  • Research teams in all disciplines (like sciences)
  • Departmental structures will atrophy
  • Open Information?

13
METAPHORS
  • Automobile in the Jungle
  • Teenagers Learning How to Drive
  • 1000 Times More Powerful Telephone
  • Learning a Second Language by Immersion
  • State Religion
  • House Calls
  • Cost of the Library
  • Students as Nomads
  • Rural Electrification

14
The Jury Is In!Technology Works!
15
I know my students learn more when I teach with
technology!
  • Technology increases collaboration. More
    collaboration means more learning
  • Technology enables different strokes for
    different folks.
    More customization means more learning
  • Technology enables more interaction. More
    interaction means more learning
  • The opportunity cost of learning how to use
    technology is becoming negligible.

16
The Big Thing Is---InteractivityandCommunicati
on
All Together One!
17
Computers Enhance My Teaching and/or Learning
Via--
Presentations Better--20
Source Wake Forest Students and Faculty
More Opportunities to Practice Analyze--35
More Access to Source Materials via Internet--43
More Communication with Faculty Colleagues,
Classmates, and Between Faculty and Students--87
18
Chemistry-- Dartmouth, Millsaps, Reed, Wake
Forest, Worchester Tech Physics-- Vassar,
Arizona, Washington and Lee, Michigan State,
, Whitman Business and Economics--- Vanderbilt,
Kansas State, Wake Forest, Middlebury Fine
Arts-- Tufts, Reed, Connecticut, Williams,
East Carolina Writing and Literature--Johns
Hopkins, Northwestern, Missouri-Rolla,
Language--- MIT, Smith, California-Davis,
Texas-Austin, Northwestern
Biology and Medicine---Oberlin, Virginia,
Johns Hopkins, Texas-Austin, Hendrix International
and Politics---Tufts, Oregon Computer Science
and Math---Harvard, NYU, American, Washington
State
93 Essays 36 Universities 26 Disciplines
19
Beliefs of 91/93 Vignette Authors
  • Interactive Learning
  • Learn by Doing
  • Collaborative Learning
  • Integration of Theory and Practice
  • Communication
  • Visualization
  • Different Strokes for Different Folks

20
8 BASIC MODELS OFUBIQUITOUS COMPUTING
  • Teach with Explicit Assumption of Access
  • Provide Public Station Computers BC
  • Provide Individual Network Computers
  • Specify Threshold Level SSU UNC
  • Provide One Desktop Per Two Beds Chatham
  • Provide Desktop Computers USAFA
  • Provide One Laptop WFU WVWC
  • Provide Laptops 2-Year Refresh UMC

ICCEL -- Wake Forest University, 2000
21
Upbeat Re Future
  • Massive expansion in overall demand
  • Public Libraries increased the demand for
    librarians and personal book ownership.
  • Telephones allow people to stay in touch, and
    gather more frequently.
  • By increasing the options, technology enhances
    the effectiveness efficiency of the university
    (it doesnt displace it)

All Together One!
22
Environmental Imperatives
  • Universal Student Access to Computers
  • Reliable Networks
  • Multiple Opportunities for Training and
    Consultation
  • Faculty Ethos that values Experimentation and
    Tolerates Falters

23
WORKSHEETWhat are the barriers to more use of
technology by faculty?For your own campus,
allocate 100 points among the three major barrier
categories!
  • _____ Faculty Need Time
  • _____ Faculty Need Access to Expertise
  • _____ Faculty Need to Motivation

24
Concepts Worth Considering
  • Eager Faculty
  • Friendly Sharing (standardize!)
  • Standard Course Shell
  • Centrality of Educational Theory
  • Diversity Among Disciplines
  • Big 3 First (KISS)
  • Start with Hybrid Courses
  • Faculty to Faculty

25
The Big Three
1. E-mail 2. Web Pages (for each course) 3.
Internet URLs
26
The Key Six
  • Continuously communicating via Email LISTSERVS
    threaded discussions,
  • Finding and citing useful materials on the web,
  • Annotating word processed documents,
  • Providing lecture outlines (with audio
    accompaniment) before and after class,
  • Creating a library of mini-movies that show
    successive computer screens, and
  • Practice quizzing prior-to-class.

27
Faculty Development Strategies-- Most Effective
  • Friends and Neighbors!
  • Full Time Academic Computer Specialists Trained
    and Located in Disciplines (ACS)
  • Well Trained Students Assigned to One Faculty
    Member for Full Semester (STARS)
  • Seminars Sponsored by the Center for Teaching and
    Learning (not only technology)
  • Tutorials re Equipment by Librarians
  • All Campus Help Desk

28
Faculty Development Strategies-- Modestly
Effective
  • Poster Sessions Where WF Faculty Show and Tell
    Their Uses of Technology
  • Seminars Sponsored by a Faculty Technology
    Advocacy Group
  • Competitive Grants Releasing Faculty From
    Teaching One Course
  • User Group Listservs Centered Around Specific
    Techniques Technologies

29
Faculty Development Strategies-- Least Effective
  • Computer Based Training Tapes
  • Lectures by Visiting VIPs
  • Computer Assisted Instruction Listserv
  • Attendance at National Workshops Conducted Locally

30
Workshops at ICCEL at Wake Forest
31
http//iccel.wfu.edu/publications/books/books.htm
http//www.ankerpub.com/books/brown.html
32
David G. BrownWake Forest UniversityWinston-Sale
m, N.C. 27109336-758-4878email
brown_at_wfu.eduhttp//www.wfu.edu/brownfax
336-758-4875
ICCEL -- Wake Forest University, 2000
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