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Character and Competence: Hallmarks of a Professional

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Character and Competence: Hallmarks of a Professional Goolsby DVP Lecture 30 September 2010 Colonel Sean Hannah, PhD United States Army Why do you want to be a leader? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Character and Competence: Hallmarks of a Professional


1
Character and Competence Hallmarks of a
Professional
Goolsby DVP Lecture 30 September 2010 Colonel
Sean Hannah, PhD United States Army
2
The Core Questions
  • Why do you want to be a leader?
  • Have you prepared yourself to lead?
  • Who and what is it that you serve?
  • What will be your legacy?

3
My goal in life is to be as good of a person my
dog already thinks I am Author Unknown
4
  • A 2007 national study by Harvard reported
    that 77 agree or strongly agree that there is a
    crisis of confidence in Americas leaders
  • Rosenthal, Pittinsky, Purvin, Montoya, 2007

Were these then really even LEADERS?
5
  • Followers look for two things in their leaders
  • Character
  • Competence
  • Both become even more important when facing a
    tough call

6
Three Options for Organizations
  • All production can be organized under one of
    three logics
  • The market of free, unregulated competition where
    consumer choice determines services, products,
    and prices
  • caveat emptor, let the buyer beware
  • A bureaucracy of planned, supervised, controlled
    work focused on predictability and efficiency
  • A profession of workers with specialized
    knowledge who organize and control their own work
    based on a trust relationship with their client
    (s)
  • cedat emptor, let the taker believe in us

7
Being a Professional
  1. Expertise
  2. A Sense of Calling and Identity
  3. A Sense of Service
  4. Identify with the Professions Ethic
  5. A sense of Stewardship/Ownership
  6. Moral Compass

In essence, the professionals practice is the
repetitive exercise of discretionary human
judgment Therefore Character is the Sine Qua Non
of any Profession
8
Principles of Officership
  • Dutyalways first, subordinating personal
    interests
  • Honor physical and moral courage, integrity and
    honesty, seeking truth, doing the right thing,
    always
  • Loyalty upward to the Constitution the
    Commander in Chief, down to all subordinates,
    central to trust between profession and citizens
  • Service to Country the officers calling,
    motivation, and legacy
  • Competence a moral imperative
  • Teamwork modeling civility and respect, placing
    the group and mission over individuals and self
  • Subordination to the organization, the mission
    and senior leaders
  • Leadership always, but always, by example to be
    emulated

9
Leadership Defined
  • A system where people are positively influenced
    and have a sense of purpose, direction, and
    motivation while operating to accomplish the
    mission and improve the organization

Leadership Is Inherently Moral
10
Leadership is an Interdependent System
Senior Leader
Unit Effectiveness and Character
Leader
Peers
Peers
Leadership emerges through positive social
interaction
Follower
Follower
Followers
11
Leadership is not Management
Command Control Plan Organize Resource
Management
Organizational Success
Inspire Motivate Enable Passion Values
Leadership
Management and Leadership can be aligned or in
conflict e.g., Espouse Organizational Values,
yet Do what it takes to make numbers
12
Authentic Leadership
  • SELF AWARE
  • TRANSPARENT
  • BALANCED IN PROCESSING
  • MORAL PERSPECTIVE

To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as
the night the day, thou canst not then be false
to any man  William Shakespeare, Hamlet
13
Leaders Ground Others in Core Values
In 1783 officers of the United States Continental
Army, camped 15 Miles from West Point, was on the
verge of a rebellion and planned to March against
the Congress in a coup d'etat. At the height of
that fervor, when even General Gates,
Washington's second in command had sided with the
rebelling officers, General Washington addressed
his assembled officers
Let me conjure you, in the name of our common
country as you value your own sacred honor as you
respect the rights of humanity as you regard the
military national character of America, to
express your utmost horror detestation of the
man who wishes, under any specious pretences, to
overturn the liberties of our country, who
wickedly attempts to open the flood gates of
civil discord, deluge our rising empire in
blood. (15 March, 1783)"
General George Washington
14
Compliance or Virtue?
Ethical Behavior
Unethical Behavior
Virtuous Behavior

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil
is for good men to do nothing Unknown
(misattributed to Edmund Burke, British Statesman)
15
To know what is right and not do it is the worst
cowardice Confucius
MORAL RECOGNITION
MORAL JUDGMENT
MORAL INTENTIONS
MORAL ACTION
Moral Cognition Processes
Moral Motivation Processes
16
Being Ethical Isn't Easy!
Leadership Group Norms
Operating Context (e.g. Industry Standards)
Professional Ethics
Physical Psychological State
Ethical Thoughts Behavior
Organization Culture Values
Personal Ethics Morals
Laws Regulations
Manager Pressures
  • Different individuals may weight the influence
    of each component differently
  • The same individual may weight influences
    differently in different contexts

17
DEVELOPED MORAL CAPABILITIES - MORAL
COMPLEXITY - MORAL IDENTITY - MORAL OWNERSHIP -
MORAL CONFIDENCE COURAGE
POSITIVE EFFECTS ON MORAL PROCESSING
MORAL RECOGNITION
MORAL JUDGMENT
MORAL INTENTIONS
MORAL ACTION
Moral Cognition Processes
Moral Motivation Processes
18
(No Transcript)
19
Taking Moral Ownership
Person
MORAL OWNERSHIP
Environment
Behavior
You are both a product of and a producer of our
environment
20
  • It isnt worthwhileto dictate to gentlemen.
    Most of these things that need legislation they
    will, no doubt, easily find for themselves
  • Plato, Republic IV

21
When will you be called upon to make the tough
(right) calls?
22
Character and Competence Hallmarks of a
Professional
  • Why do you want to be a leader?
  • Have you prepared yourself to lead?
  • Who and what is it that you serve?
  • What will be your legacy?

23
Extra Backup slides
24
ORG Level Ethical Development Techniques
  • Supportive, Morally-Developed Organization
  • Ensure Espoused and In-Use Values are Aligned
  • Ensure Artifacts Reward Systems are Aligned
    with Values
  • Role Modeling at all levels
  • Psychological Safety
  • Reinforcing Structures and Systems
  • Ethical Performance Feedback
  • Leader Attention Raise Visibility
  • Add ethics to all organizational planning systems
  • Add ethics discussions to after action reviews
  • Frame issues as moral

25
Some Ethical Development Techniques
  • Key Developmental Ethical Experiences Trigger
    Events
  • Coupled with guided reflection meaning-making
    of those events
  • Cognitive disequilibrium
  • Moral dilemma discussions
  • Teaching deliberate cognitive moral
    decision-making skills and processes
  • Process challenges through multiple lenses
  • Building Moral Potency (Courage, Confidence,
    Ownership)
  • Mastery Experiences
  • Vicarious Learning
  • Social Persuasion
  • Raising perceptions of Moral Intensity/Deterring
    moral disengagement
  • Placing moral issues in humanistic terms,
    discouraging sanitizing language, making salient
    the injurious effects, limiting attribution of
    blame, etc
  • Build Moral Individual and Social identity

26
To Understand Your Ethic and Profession You Need
to Think Past the Tip of the Iceberg
All of these observable objects are called
artifacts. Artifacts can mostly be seen, touched,
and heard.
Artifacts
Surface
These beliefs become intertwined over ones
experiences such that they become attitudes about
the worth or importance of people, concepts or
things that we then call values. ESPOUSED and
IN USE Values
Shared Values
Underlying Assumptions
These values permeate organizations, and when
shared, reinforced and validated as successful
in solving the problems of organizational
survival and effectiveness, they gradually become
transformed into underlying assumptions,
supported by articulated sets of beliefs, norms,
and operational rules of behavior.
27
Moral Rationalization
  • Advantageous comparisons (our actions aren't as
    bad as the other companys)
  • Attributing blame to victims (they were asking
    for it)
  • Diffusion of responsibility (we wouldnt have to
    do this if headquarters didnt demand such profit
    numbers)
  • Dehumanizing victims (these regulators are a
    bunch of snakes)
  • Choosing to not recognize the extent of harm
    (only a few people will have bad side effects)
  • Using sanitizing language or euphemisms (a
    bomber servicing a target causes collateral
    damage).

Any of these strategies allow the actor to lessen
the perceived severity of their actions and
thereby protect their moral self-esteem/self-ident
ity
28
Ethical Leadership
  • Conducts his/her personal life in an ethical
    manner
  • Defines success not just by results, but also by
    the way they are obtained
  • Listens to what unit members have to say
  • Disciplines unit members who violate ethical
    standards
  • Makes fair and balanced decisions
  • Can be trusted
  • Discusses ethics or values with unit members
  • Sets an example of how to do things the right way
    in terms of ethics
  • Has the best interests of unit members in mind
  • When making decisions, asks what is the right
    thing to do?

Brown and Trevino, 2006
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