Renaissance 1. What were the backgrounds of the Renaissance historically? 14-16 C. A. famine, plague, war, and religious dissent, Latin of the church, of law courts, of Scholasticism in Europe; B. new birth of ancient Roman Latin - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Renaissance 1. What were the backgrounds of the Renaissance historically? 14-16 C. A. famine, plague, war, and religious dissent, Latin of the church, of law courts, of Scholasticism in Europe; B. new birth of ancient Roman Latin

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Title: Renaissance 1. What were the backgrounds of the Renaissance historically? 14-16 C. A. famine, plague, war, and religious dissent, Latin of the church, of law courts, of Scholasticism in Europe; B. new birth of ancient Roman Latin


1
Renaissance 1. What were the
backgrounds of the Renaissance historically?
14-16 C. A. famine, plague, war, and religious
dissent, Latin of the church, of law
courts, of Scholasticism in Europe B. new
birth of ancient Roman Latin for native
literature as by Petrarch, the Italian poet,
to describe ideas of humanism and patriotism.
2
The School of Athens (1510-1511), one of several
frescoes in the Vatican Palace, depicts ancient
Greek philosophers and scholars, such as Plato
and Aristotle (center)it is considered a
masterpiece in the portrayal of the artistic
ideals of the Renaissance. It also illustrates
the importance of classical studies to literary
and cultural achievements of the era.
3
Classical Studies Renaissance humanists
studied the literature of ancient Greece and
Rome, believing that these classical works
represented the height of human knowledge and
were important models for a new age. St. Jerome
in His Study by the Italian painter Antonello da
Messina (1430-1479) depicts the 4th-century
scholar Jerome. He was known for his important
literary accomplishments, including a translation
of the Bible into Latin.
4
Leonardo da Vinci known not only as a masterful
painter but as an architect, sculptor, engineer,
and scientist. His pursuit of knowledge was
relentless and his discoveries left lasting
changes in the fields of art and science. With
his sophisticated skills and love for learning,
Leonardo embodied the curiosity and individualism
of the era and was the quintessential Renaissance
man.
5
Giotto Italian painter Giotto is held in high
regard as the artist who moved away from the
traditional medieval technique of portraying the
human figure as a stiff, flat, two-dimensional
character. An artist far ahead of his time,
Giotto began to protray humans as rounded,
proportioned, and naturalistic. His work
influenced the development of Renaissance art
more than a century after his death in Florence
in 1337.
6
Petrarch, who perfected the sonnet form and is
often regarded as the first modern poet, was also
one of the first humanists. Petrarchs love of
the classics and his belief in the value of human
experience influenced his own writing and
inspired other humanists.
7
2. What were the characteristics of the
Renaissance? A. rediscovery of Classical
Literature and Art as objects of ideal beauty
or learning, instead of professional
work of theologians/philosophers B. curiosity
about the objective world interest in the
morality of human actions, instead of
abstract talks of religious issues C.
Individualism concept of fame education
for overall development
8
3. What interpretations were given by
scholars of the Renaissance? A. as rebirth of
art that was inspired by ancient Greco-Roman
glories as rebirth of republican government
in ancient Rome before emperors as
rebirth of Greco-Roman arts in the reform of
Christian society as the beginning of the
modern era with a fundamental
individualism B. as gradual change based on the
high order of civilized Middle Ages
9
Portrait of Michelangelo Italian artist
Michelangelo's extraordinary accomplishments in
painting, sculpture, and architecture made him
one of the outstanding figures in Renaissance
art. During his lifetime (1475-1564) he
influenced many young artists, including the
Florentine writer and painter Giorgio Vasari, who
included this likeness of Michelangelo in one of
his own works.
10
Tomb of Leonardo Bruni Italian artist Bernardo
Rossellino combined elements of architecture and
sculpture when he created the tomb of Leonardo
Bruni, a prominent Florentine humanist.
Rossellino also evoked the grandeur of classical
antiquity by borrowing elements such as the
imperial Roman eagles seen directly below Bruni,
as well as his crown of laurel. Bruni and his
followers admired the republican government of
ancient Rome and encouraged the citizens of
Florence and other Italian city-states to adopt a
new patriotism based on the Roman model. The
tomb, begun in 1444, is in the Church of Santa
Croce, Florence, Italy.
11
Voltaire The French writer and philosopher
Voltaire is considered one of the central figures
of the Age of Enlightenment, a period following
the Renaissance which emphasized the power of
human reason, science, and respect for humanity.
Voltaire believed that literature should serve as
a vehicle for social change. His biting satires
and philosophical writings demonstrated his
aversion to Christianity, intolerance, and
tyranny. The expression captured in this portrait
of Voltaire in 1718 hints at the sharp sense of
humor with which he won the favor of 18th-century
French society.
12
Medieval Schools During the Middle Ages,
advocates of Scholasticism sought to forge a
connection between classical Greek philosophy and
Christian theology through the use of logic.
Teachers and instructors employed the concepts of
reason and revelation to teach their students how
to think. In this 15th-century Italian painting,
parents take their children to see a teacher of
grammar.
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