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The Effects of Reading at Home With a Parent on Reading Achievement in School

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Title: The Effects of Reading at Home With a Parent on Reading Achievement in School


1
The Effects of Reading at Home With a Parent on
Reading Achievement in School
  • Alissa Collins
  • Education 702.22
  • Midterm Presentation

2
Table of Contents
  • Introduction
  • Statement of the Problem
  • Literature Review
  • Statement of the Hypothesis

3
Introduction
  • Parents have the ability to be their childs
    first teacher.
  • When a parent reads to or with a young child
    this not only presents an opportunity for
    bonding, but these children could potentially
    learn to read before ever entering school. If
    practice makes perfect every parent should try
    their best to help their child become a PERFECT
    READER !

4
Statement of the Problem
  • In a suffering and changing economy many parents
  • must work long hours or several jobs and do not
  • get to spend much time with their children at
  • night. The children are missing an opportunity to
  • establish of further develop their reading
    skills.

5
Statement of the Problem (continued)
  • Literacy learning at home influences reading
    achievement in school. (Adams, 1990 Meyer et
    al., 1994 Whitehurst et al., 1994).
  • Book reading with parents facilitates the
    learning of written language (Koskinen et al.,
    2000 Wells,1985 Whitehurst et al., 1994
    Whitehurst et al., 1988).
  • Found in- Effects of a family literacy program
    adapting parental intervention to first graders
    evolution of reading and writing abilities by
    Lise Saint-Laurent and Jocelyne Giasson

6
Literature Review
  • After spending 9 weeks attending workshops for
    parents on how to read to your child and how to
    question your child after reading, the children
    who belonged to these parents performed
    significantly better on a formal assessment of
    reading and writing at the end of the year than
    children in the same grade who had parents that
    did not participate.
  • (Saint- Laurent Giasson, 2005).
  • Economic class is often believed to influence
    reading achievement and how much time a parent is
    able to spend reading with their child. In a
    study where students were given the opportunity
    to read a text in the classroom, then spend time
    with it at home and then bring it back to the
    classroom again, my belief that practice makes
    perfect (or at least an improvement) is
    supported. The childs first language and the
    socio-economic status of their family were
    accounted for. The amount of support given at
    home by the parent or guardian was analyzed. At
    the end of this study all students had improved
    in independent reading, and the students who had
    more parental involvement improved more than the
    students with less parental involvement.
  • (Hindon Paratore, 2007).

7
Literature Review Contd
  • If you spend any time at all in a NYC Public
    school you will realize how many
  • students speak a language other than English at
    home. A study done in
  • California supports the idea that reading at home
    in both English and a childs
  • Native language will improve vocabulary
    development.
  • (Roberts, 2008).
  • Children who were given an opportunity to take
    books home from school and
  • read them with their parents showed an increased
    interest in reading as well
  • as a higher reading level at the end of the
    study.
  • (White Otto, 1990).
  • Decoding was seen as a negative experience for
    some students and their
  • parents during a study completed in 2001. The
    basis of this study was to
  • look at how parents and their children interacted
    during shared reading and
  • to determine what types of interactions are the
    most beneficial.
  • (Baker, Mackler, Sonnenschein Serpell, 2001).

8
Literature Review Contd
  • Rasinski and Fast Start
  • This program stresses to parents how essential
    and
  • vital their involvement is in the reading
  • development of their children. This program was
  • effective for children who are considered to be
  • adequate learners and for students who were
  • considered to be at risk. This program
  • showed results and received positive feedback
    from
  • the parents.

9
Statement of Hypothesis
  • This study intends to demonstrate that reading at
    home with your child will improve their reading
    performance and advance their reading level at
    school.
  • Teachers can make a difference too! Reading to a
    young group of students will help improve their
    reading skills.

10
References
  • Baker, L., Macklet, K., Sonnenschein, S.,
    Serpell, R. (2001). Parent Interaction with
    Their First Grade Children During Storybook
    Reading and Relations With Subsequent Home
    Reading Activity and Reading Achievement.
    Journal of School Psychology, 39(5).
  • doi101016/S0022-4405(01)00082-6
  • Hindin, A., Paratore, J. R. (2007). Supporting
    Young Childrens Literary Learning Through Home-
    School Partnerships The Effectiveness of a Home
    Repeated-Reading Intervention. Journal of
    Literacy Research, 39(3).
  • doi 1080/10862960701613102
  • Laasko, M.L., Poikkeus, A.M., Eklund, K.,
    Lyytinen, P. (2004). Interest in early Shared
    reading Its relation to later anguage and
    letter knowledge in children with and without
    risk for reading difficulties. First
    Language,24,323-344.
  • doi10.1177/0142723704046041

11
References - continued
  • Partridge, H. A. (2004). Helping Parents Make the
    Most of Shared Book Reading. Early Childhood
    Education Journal, 32(1), 25-30
  • Doi10.1023/BECEJ.0000039640.63118.d4
  • Raban, B., Nolan, A. (2005). Reading practices
    experienced by preschool children in areas of
    disadvantage. Journal of Early Childhood
    Research, 3. 289-298.
  • Doi 10.1177/1476718x05056528
  • Roberts, T.A. (2008). Home Storybook Reading in
    Primary or Second Language With Pre School
    Children. Evidence of Equal Effectiveness for
    Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition.
    Electronic Version Reading Research Quarterly,
    43(2), 103-130.
  • Rasinski, T., Stevenson, B. (2005). The Effects
    of Fast Start Reading A Fluency Based Home
    Involvement Reading Program on the Reading
    Achievement of Beginning Readers. Reading
    Psychology An International Quarterly, 26(2).
  • doi 10.1080/02702710590930483

12
References continued
  • Saint-Laurent, L., Giasson, J. (2005). Effects
    of a family literacy program adapting Parental
    intervention to first graders evolution of
    reading and writing abilities. Journal of Early
    Childhood Literacy, 5.
  • doi 10.1177/146879840508688
  • Vandermaas-Peeler, M., Nelson, J., Bumpass, C.,
    Sassine, B. (2009). Social contexts of
    development Parent-child interactions during
    reading and play. Journal of Early Childhood
    Literacy, 9, 295-317.
  • Doi 10.1177/1468798409345112
  • White Otto, B. (1990). Development of Innter-City
    Kindergarteners Emergent Literacy In a
    Read-at-home Program. Resources in Education,
    26. Retrieved from http//search.ebscohost.com.e
    zproxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu2048/login.
    aspx?directtruedbericANED323527siteehost-li
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