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Title: Short Tips for Student


1
Short Tips for Students Presentations
  • These are the 5 steps you should include in your
    presentation.
  • I. The Attention Step Get peoples attention.
  • II. The Need/Problem Step Explain the problem
    its importance.
  • III. The Answer Step List solutions to the
    problem.
  • IV. The Visualization Step Show examples of the
    harm of ignoring answers and/or benefits of
    following solutions.
  • V. The Action Step give motivation information
    for action.
  • Also
  • Network theory examples
  • Check Steve Jobs presentation tips on slides
    87-97.
  • Avoid design mistakes on slides
  • Avoid plagiarism. Use references.

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Short Tips for Students Presentations
  • Useful Ideas on giving presentationsPresent
    Like Steve Jobs https//www.youtube.com/watch?v
    2-ntLGOyHw4 Presentations Best practices
    (examples from Steve Jobs presentations)https//w
    ww.youtube.com/watch?vq3CVys6YSTE How to Give
    an Awesome (PowerPoint) Presentation (very
    short)https//www.youtube.com/watch?vi68a6M5FFBc
    Good example Hans Rosling Debunking
    third-world myths with the best stats you've ever
    seen http//www.ted.com/talks/hans_rosling_shows_t
    he_best_stats_you_ve_ever_seen.htmlSusan
    McConnell (Stanford) Designing effective
    scientific presentations https//www.youtube.com/
    watch?vHp7Id3Yb9XQ Designing PowerPoint
    Slides for a Scientific Presentation
    https//www.youtube.com/watch?v1fs_jqXGs8s
    Killer Presentation Skills https//www.youtub
    e.com/watch?vwhTwjG4ZIJg Top 10 Presentation
    Mistakes (and How to Avoid Them) Part 1 of 3
    https//www.youtube.com/watch?vHUpI6ROwRAE

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Short Tips for Students Presentations
  • Intro body closingNot so good
  • Tell them what youre going to say, tell them,
    then tell them what you said.
  • Make people comfortable hungry, bored, tired,
    bladder full, etc.
  • Sending people on journeys of self discovery.
  • Make eye contact.
  • Stop talking, so they can digest last thing you
    said and contemplate itpause is really important
    for that..ask questions for that purpose too.
  • Hands is in pockets..a no-no, esp. with coins.
  • Dont dwell on history. You care. They dont. 25
    profits last year, now this year were after your
    money ?.
  • Some people can break rulesbecause they have
    charisma. Normal people cant.

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How to Give Good Presentationswritten/compiled
by professor Bryan Bissell
I am always doing that which I can not do, in
order that I may learn how to do it. Pablo
Picasso.
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Why Are Presentations Important?
  • To get good grades in classes (like this one).
  • 2) To be successful in business (more profit,
    more efficiency, better technology, etc.).
  • 3) To share your important ideas effectively.
  • 4) To sell products sell yourself effectively.
  • 5) To change peoples minds and views.(M.L.
    King, Churchill, JFK, pastors, etc.)
  • 6) To improve your resume (get better jobs).

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Bad Presentations
  • Audience wont see your work is great
  • But will make fun of you from back row

What does that slide say?
Those are some NASTY colors
Dunno, Im playing minesweeper
Hey it matches my tie.
Please let it be OVER
zzz
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Good Presentations
  • Interesting topic, explained at audiences level
  • Slides are understandable and easy to see
  • Good presentations reflect well on speaker!

I understood this one!
I wonder if this technique would work for my
problem
You shouldwin a PhD
Lets talk to them at the break
But its outsidemy main area
I never thought of that!
Interesting
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YOU TOO CAN PRESENT!
  • Prepare Identify goals obstacles.
  • Research Gather data. Plan strategy.
  • 3) Persuade Use the persuasion process.
  • 4) Dont Plagiarize How to use ideas from others
    honestly.
  • 5) Design Organize information effectively.
  • 6) Be Clear culture, vocabulary, etc.
  • 7) Delivery Present with confidence.
  • 8) Practice makes Perfect
  • 9) Question Answer Time
  • !!!JUST DO ITMANY TIMES!!!

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How to Give Good Presentations1) Prepare 2)
Research
  • A) Whats your 1 goal? (Why, Who, What).
  • B) Know your topic. Gather data, information
    research, media, etc. to reach your goal.
  • C) Identify obstructions to your
    goal --knowledge level of the audience
    --arguments against your view, criticisms,
    motivation, rival products, etc. --network
    theory-graceful degradation --culture
    differences, biases, prejudices --Think
    realistically. What is best evidence? --Focus on
    conveying main point effectively

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TRUTH CHANGE
Plato wroteTruth is the beginning of every
good thing, both in heaven and on earth
... But, he also realized change is
uncomfortableNo one is more hated than he who
speaks the truth. The truth will set you free,
but first it will make you miserable. ? Rick
Warren
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NETWORK THEORY--GRACEFUL DEGRADATION
  • Most people have many reasons for the views they
    have. Showing that one reasons has problems
    usually will not change them. This is very
    logical. Scientific concepts like the Big Bang
    work this way. There is some evidence against it,
    some hard problems (horizon problem), but it has
    much good evidence.

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NETWORK THEORY--GRACEFUL DEGRADATION
  • Common reasons for views are
  • Relational family, friends, co-workers influence
  • Tradition cultural and traditional influences
  • Career/Prestige boss, company, etc. views.

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NETWORK THEORY--GRACEFUL DEGRADATION
  • Common reasons for views are
  • Benefits/Costs keeping jobs, difficulty in
    changing
  • Establishments views of scientists, professors,
    pastors, etc. Keeping reputation.
  • Evidential witnesses, observations,
    correlations, testimonies, practical benefit,
    inferences, etc.

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NETWORK THEORY-GRACEFUL DEGRADATIONReasons
people follow capitalism.
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NETWORK THEORY-GRACEFUL DEGRADATIONReasons
people believe in Christianity.
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How to Give Good Presentations 1) Prepare 2)
Research
  • D) Research other similar presentations.
  • E) Map out a process to reach your goal
    overcome criticisms, obstacles, rivals, etc.
  • F) Check room computers, projectors, equipment,
    compatibility, etc.
  • G) Practice, Practice, Practice!
  • I am always doing that which I can not do, in
  • order that I may learn how to do it. Picasso

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PRESENTATION HOMEWORK
  • I. How can people improve their lives?--get
    better grades, --learn English better--have fun
    traveling--find a girlfriend/boyfriend, have
    better love--how to be happier, more
    beautiful--have a good family/be better
    parents--have more freedom--make more
    money--how does your major help peoples
    livesmany more.

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • I. The Attention Step Get peoples attention.
  • II. The Need/Problem Step Explain the problem
    its importance.
  • III. The Answer Step List solutions to the
    problem.
  • IV. The Visualization Step Show examples of the
    harm of ignoring answers and benefits of
    following solutions.
  • V. The Action Step give motivation information
    for action.

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • I. The Attention Step
  • relating to the audience (being a student)
  • humorous anecdote/cartoon(teacher he didnt
    like/Simpson excerpt)
  • showing importance of the topic
  • telling a dramatic story
  • using visual aids for illustration
  • EXAMPLEVisual aid to explain global warming.
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vNXMarwAusY4

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • I. The Attention Step
  • making a starting (or startling) statement
  • posing a question (maybe rhetorical)
  • arousing curiosity or suspense
  • using a quotation relevant to your topic

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TOOLS FOR BLEEDING
http//www.surgicaltechnologists.net/blog/20-scary
-old-school-surgical-tools
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BLOOD LETTING MOST COMMON MEDICAL TECHNIQUE
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Attention
  • If you could make a graph of student attention
    over time in a 1 hour class, what do you think it
    would look like?

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Attention
Time
End of class
Start of class
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Attention
  • Did people come to see your talk specifically?
  • Almost everyone listens in the beginning.
  • Present message, make it clear the audience cant
    afford to miss the rest!
  • To get message through, state it at the beginning
    and end

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Better Approach
  • Divide your presentation in several parts, each
    ended by an intermediate conclusion
  • Distracted people can always easily catch up with
    you
  • Important items said many times

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • II. The Need/Problem Step.
  • Give a clear concise statement or description of
    the need or problem.
  • Give humorous illustrations of the problem.
  • EXAMPLE Simpsons cartoon excerpt
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vOqVyRa1iuMc
  • One or more detailed examples which illustrate
    the need/problem.
  • EXAMPLE Many problems in nature with
    animals/diseases
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vyRLCUdWuyng

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • II. The Need/Problem Step.
  • Statistical data (dont overwhelm us with
    statistics, make sure we can relate to them)
  • EXAMPLES Graphs of the rise in CO2
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vxtyieNg18O0
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?v9tkDK2mZlOo
  • Testimony, pictures, and other forms of support
    to show the need and how serious it is.
  • Ice melting worldwide
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?v6hFxG-8I0Go

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • II. The Need/Problem Step.
  • Think of how the need/problem directly affects
    your audience their health, happiness, security,
    or other interests. Help them be ready for a
    solution.

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The "Malboro Man" was famous for decades in TV
advertisements. He died of lung cancer at age 51
in July, 1992. He said "Take care of the
children. Tobacco will kill you, and I am living
proof of it.
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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • III. The Answer Step
  • Briefly state the changed people should make.
  • A complete concise explanation of your plan.
  • A theoretical demonstration show how this
    action logically meets the problem.
  • Give actual examples showing that this plan has
    worked effectively, and its a practical
    solution.
  • Use facts, figures and the testimony of experts
    to support your claims/plan.

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • III. The Answer Step
  • Make sure audience understands plan well.
  • Diagrams and charts are often useful here.
  • Audience should be thinking, A) How can I
    benefit? orB) What is the danger of not
    changing? orC) both A and B.

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Cigarettes ? 10 years of life50-Year Study
Shows www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A619
81-2004Jun22.html Heavy drinking? 5-20 years
of lifewww.cleanandsoberlive.com/the-benefits-of-
quitting-drinking-why-should-you-stop/
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HARVARD STUDY 120,000 people--1,2, 3 servings
of meat a day (card deck size) ?13, 25, 36
higher risk of death--1 hot dog/2 bacon
slices ?20 higher risk of death (all
causes)?Heart disease risk18 and 21
higher. ?Cancer risk 10 and 16 higher 
http//www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/re
d-meat-consumption-linked-to-increased-risk-of-tot
al-cardiovascular-and-cancer-mortality/
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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • IV. The Visualization/Dream Step.
  • A) The Positive Method Describe future benefits
    if they use your product/strategy. Be specific
    explain in detail.
  • B) The Negative Method Describe future problems
    if they do NOT use your product /strategy. Be
    specific about the dangers and harm that may or
    will come to them. (repeat some of the Need Step)

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • IV. The Visualization/Dream Step.
  • C) The Contrast Method Combine A and B.
    Visualize negatives first. Then help audience
    feel the results of B if they follow you.
  • Katrina Hurricane Disaster
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vLzx24hw_K5I
  • Future flooding if not action taken
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?v1KkrlhoFbBM

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • V. The Action Step--Change desire into action
  • Summarize what youve said. (pastors)
  • Give a challenge or appeal (Dr. Martin King Jr.)
  • Use a quotation
  • Tell a story/illustrationEXAMPLE Al Gores
    sister dying because of smoking in spite of
    scientific evidence.
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vWy-sMB4xBjQ

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How to Give Good Presentations3) Persuasion
Process
  • V. The Action Step--Change desire into action
  • What will YOU do? (Joshua)
  • You must conclude with a call for ACTION! --Tell
    them when, where etc. a service/product is
    offered. --Explain how to buy/order
    product/service.--Give out your business card.
  • EXAMPLES Basic ideas for solving it (see end).
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vFzQ0GeLVLhk
  • Website with tips
  • http//www.climatecrisis.net/take_action/12_tips.p
    hp

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Deliver a Presentation Like Steve Jobs
  • Carmine Gallo
  • http//www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/jan20
    08/sb20080125_269732.htm
  • Geared toward business presentations.

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1. Set the theme
  • "There is something in the air today."
  • With those words, Jobs opened Macworld and set
    the theme for his presentation
  • Hinted at MacBook Air
  • Every presentation needs a theme, but you don't
    have to deliver it at the start.
  • 20 minutes into his 2007 presentation "Today
    Apple reinvents the phone."
  • Once you identify your theme, make sure you
    deliver it several times throughout your
    presentation.

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2. Demonstrate enthusiasm
  • Show your passion for the project
  • extraordinary, amazing, cool, insanely
    great
  • Most speakers have room to add some flair to
    their presentations.
  • Your audience wants to be wowed, not put to
    sleep.
  • Inject your own personality into it.
  • Most speakers get into presentation mode and feel
    as though they have to strip the talk of any fun.
  • If you are not enthusiastic about your own
    products or services, how do you expect your
    audience to be?

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3. Provide an outline
  • Jobs outlined the presentation by saying, "There
    are four things I want to talk about today. So
    let's get started
  • Jobs followed his outline by verbally opening and
    closing each of the four sections and making
    clear transitions in between.
  • Contradictory to prior advice for scientific
    presentations?

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4. Make numbers meaningful
  • Instead of Apple has sold 4 million iPhones to
    date, he put it in perspective by adding,
    "That's 20,000 iPhones every day, on average."
  • Jobs went on to say, "What does that mean to the
    overall market?"
  • Jobs detailed the breakdown of the U.S smartphone
    market and Apple's share of it to demonstrate
    just how impressive the number actually is.
  • Connect the dots for your listeners.

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5. Try for an unforgettable moment
  • This is the moment in your presentation that
    everyone will be talking about.
  • Every Steve Jobs presentation builds up to one
    big scene.
  • 2008 Macworld keynote, it was the announcement of
    MacBook Air. To demonstrate just how thin it is,
    Jobs pulled it out of an envelope.

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6. Create visual slides
  • While most speakers fill their slides with data,
    text, and charts, Jobs does the opposite.
  • For example, his phrase "The first thing I want
    to talk to you about today" was accompanied by a
    slide with the numeral 1.
  • "There is something in the air.
  • There is a trend in public speaking to paint a
    picture for audiences by creating more visual
    graphics. Inspiring presenters are short on
    bullet points and big on graphics.

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7. Give 'em a show
  • A Jobs presentation has ebbs and flows, themes
    and transitions
  • Instead of simply delivering information, Jobs
    includes video clips, demonstrations, and guests.

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8. Don't sweat the small stuff
  • Despite your best preparation, something might go
    wrong
  • E.g., Jobs was about to show some photographs
    from Flickr, and the screen went black. Jobs
    smiled and said, "Well, I guess Flickr isn't
    serving up the photos today.
  • He then recapped the new features he had just
    introduced.
  • It was no big deal.
  • Some presenters get flustered over minor
    glitches. Don't sweat minor mishaps. Have fun.
    Few will remember a glitch unless you call
    attention to it.

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9. Sell the benefit
  • While most presenters promote product features,
    Jobs sells benefits.
  • E.g., renting a more popular model for movies
    than owning
  • Your listeners are always asking themselves,
    "What's in it for me?" Answer the question. Don't
    make them guess.
  • Clearly state the benefit of every service,
    feature, or product.

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10. Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse
  • Steve Jobs cannot pull off an intricate
    presentation with video clips, demonstrations,
    and outside speakers without hours of rehearsal.
  • Jobs supposedly rehearses the entire presentation
    aloud for many hours.
  • A Steve Jobs presentation looks effortless
    because it is well-rehearsed.

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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • Its good to use a few ideas from others for at
    least 3 reasons
  • 1) You arent an expert on every topic.
  • 2) To show you have read thinkers on your topic
    and are informed.
  • 3) To show that others agree with you- Build
    credibility/trust for your idea.
  • BUT, DONT PLAGIARIZE (??)

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PLAGIARISM (??) DONT DO IT!!!
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Plagiarism can also be defined as
  • cheating or deception. Trying to get grades,
    money, etc. for work that you didnt do. It is
    cheating deceitful to claim the credit for
    something that is not your work.

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Why is plagiarism wrong?
  • If you plagiarize, you are cheating yourself.
    You don't learn to write out your thoughts in
    your own words, and you don't get specific
    feedback geared to your individual needs and
    skills.

The red section actually came from
http//sja.ucdavis.edu/sja/avoid.htm There are no
quote marks or references.That is plagiarism!!!
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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • BUT, DONT PLAGIARIZE

Madonna Constantine, Ward Churchill
Mary Zey
Quite a few university students are expelled for
plagiarism. (143 in the UK in 2008)
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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • BUT, DONT PLAGIARIZE

Prof. Han Jin (Inje) Prof. Ma Kwang-soo
(Yonsei)
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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • Use Others Ideas Honestly.
  • Usually, you need to list
  • 1) Person (authors name)
  • 2) Place (the source/place you found it
    (article, magazine, book, website, etc.),
  • 3) Page number
  • 4) the date (sometimes)

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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • Use Others Ideas Honestly
  • A) QUOTES FROM FAMOUS PEOPLE, ESP. IF DEAD)
  • We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then,
    is not an act, but a habit. AristotleMore
    details are good. But, just the name is OK.

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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • Use Others Ideas Honestly
  • B) Quotes from magazines
  • Americans consume 21 million barrels of oil
    every day... Delbanco, Andreas The Future of
    Energy, inTime July, 2006 4

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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • Use Others Ideas Honestly
  • C) Quotes from books
  • It is the work of true education to train the
    youth to be thinkers, and not mere reflectors of
    other men's thought. White, Ellen. Education. p.
    18.

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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
D) Quotes from internet When he lunches with
President BushBono quotes Scripture and talks
about small projects in Africa that have specific
metrics for success. Then he asks for more money
to fund them. In the office of Senator Dick
Durbinhe speaks of how development aid reminds
the rest of the world of America's greatness. In
stadiums, he tells people that if they join
together, they have a chance to make poverty
history. Tyrnagiel, Josh. The Constant
Charmer. Time Magazine. Dec. 19, 2005.
http//www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1
142270,00.html.
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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • REFERENCES ON POWERPOINTS
  • Because of space problems, you can just list the
    website or book and page number on each
    slide.OR
  • You can list your sources at the end

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How to Give Good Presentations4) Dont
Plagiarize/Use References
  • REFERENCES ON POWERPOINTS
  • Because of space problems, you can just list the
    website or book and page number on each
    slide.OR
  • You can list your sources at the end.
  • See next 2 slides for examples.

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Sources
  • Edward R. Tufte Envisioning Information, The
    Visual Display of Quantitative Information, The
    Cognitive Style of PowerPoint Pitching Out
    Corrupts Within
  • Luca Aceto,Aalborg University and Olivier Danvy,
    Arhus, Denmark
  • http//www.cs.aau.dk/luca/SLIDES/howtotalk-ru.pdf
  • Michigan State University Graduate Student
    Organization
  • http//www.fw.msu.edu/orgs/gso/documents/GSOWorksh
    opDocsSp2006/TipsforGivingaScientificPresentation.
    pdf
  • http//www.fw.msu.edu/orgs/gso/documents/GSOWorksh
    opDocsSp2006/PresentationTipsinPowerPoint.ppt428,
    1
  • Susan Herzog, Eastern Connecticut State
    University
  • http//www.easternct.edu/smithlibrary/library1/pre
    sentations.htmppt
  • Heather Heying, Evergreen
  • http//academic.evergreen.edu/H/heyingh/downloads/
    givingatalk.pdf
  • Mark Schoeberl and Brian Toon
  • http//www.cgd.ucar.edu/cms/agu/scientific_talk.ht
    ml
  • John Cairns, Jr., BioScience Vol. 39 No. 9
  • http//www.fw.msu.edu/orgs/gso/documents/GSOWorksh
    opDocsSp2006/CairnsSpeakingAtLength.pdf
  • CD-Condensed Matter Journal Club
  • http//www.physics.ucdavis.edu/kliu/Phy298/Presen
    tationTips.pdf
  • Meshnick SR, Eaton JW., City College, CUNY
    Medical School,
  • Prog Clin Biol Res. 1989319663-4. How to give a
    scientific talk., New York., PMID 2622932
    PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE
  • How to give a job talk

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Rewriting Facts
ORIGINAL Florence was born into a rich family at
the Villa Colombia in Florence, Italy, on May 12,
1820, but grew up in England. She and her sister
loved the countryside and Nightingale sometimes
took care of sick dogs and animals in the area.
In 1840, Nightingale begged her parents to let
her study mathematics more. After many emotional
arguments, her parents finally let her study math
with several excellent math teachers. Her math
skills became very important in her nursing work
and helped her to pioneer the coxcomb pie
charts which people everywhere use now. She
improved sanitation, medicine, nursing and saved
millions of lives.
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Rewriting Facts
REWRITTEN The Nightingale family had a baby,
Florence. She grew up in England. She liked to go
into the country and ride horses. She was very
sympathetic and helped sick animals get better.
She also loved helping sick animals get better.
She loved studying. She really liked math. Once,
she begged her mother to let her study math.
Finally, her parents agreed. Florence later
taught other students in math. She used her math
skills a lot. She made the first pie charts,
coxcombs. These helped doctors very much. Her
work saved millions of lives.
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Rewriting Facts
You can rewrite facts without quotes (although
citing your sources here is good too.)
ORIGINALShe and her sister loved the
countryside and Nightingale sometimes took care
of sick dogs and animals in the
area. REWRITTEN She liked to go into the
country and ride horses. She was very sympathetic
and helped sick animals get better.
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How to Give Good Presentations5) Slide Design
  • Goals
  • Convey the necessary information
  • Be readable/understandable
  • Be interesting (enough)
  • Avoid
  • Over stimulation
  • Booooring

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Logos
  • We know you had support
  • Dont need to list all of them every slide
  • If on first slide, dont obscure title/authors
  • Maybe save it for last slide

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Outline
  • Title Slide
  • Introduction
  • Outline
  • My Work
  • Results
  • Conclusions

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Outline Slides
  • Previous slide didnt help audience
  • If you use outline slide, make it USEFUL
  • Everyone (hopefully) introduces their topic
  • Everyone explains their work, gives results
  • What is specific to YOUR talk?
  • Talk length correlates to outline need
  • Talk is 45 minutes, maybe!
  • Talk is 5 minutes probably not.

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README.TXT
  • Do not attempt to put all the text, code, or
    explanation of what you are talking about
    directly onto the slide, especially if it
    consists of full, long sentences. Or paragraphs.
    Theres no place for paragraphs on slides. If
    you have complete sentences, you can probably
    take something out.
  • If you do that, you will have too much stuff to
    read on the slide, which isnt always a good
    thing.
  • Like the previous slide, people do not really
    read all the stuff on the slides.
  • Thats why its called a presentation and not
    a reading of your work
  • Practice makes perfect, which is what gets you
    away from having to have all of you notes in
    textual form on the screen in front of you.
  • Utilize the Notes function of PowerPoint, have
    them printed out for your reference.
  • The audience doesnt need to hear the exact same
    thing that you are reading to them.
  • The bullet points are simply talking points and
    should attempt to summarize the big ideas that
    you are trying to convey
  • If youve reached anything less than 18 point
    font, for Gods sake, please
  • Remove some of the text
  • Split up the text and put it on separate slides
  • Perhaps you are trying to do much in this one
    slide?
  • Reading a slide is annoying.
  • You should not simply be a text-to-speech
    converter.

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Font Size
  • You are close to your monitor
  • Your audience is far from the screen

Tahoma 32 pt 28 pt 24 pt 20 pt 18 pt 16 pt 14
pt 12 pt 10 pt
TNR 32 pt 28 pt 24 pt 20 pt 18 pt 16 pt 14 pt 12
pt 10 pt
Comic 32 pt 28 pt 24 pt 20 pt 18 pt 16 pt 14
pt 12 pt 10 pt
Lucida Sans 32 pt 28 pt 24 pt 20 pt 18 pt 16
pt 14 pt 12 pt 10 pt
Courier 32 pt 28 pt 24 pt 20 pt 18 pt 16 pt 14
pt 12 pt 10 pt
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Squint City
  • If you find yourself saying you probably cant
    read/see this, but
  • Then you probably have a BAD SLIDE!
  • There are exceptions, but very few
  • Test on real screen in conference room
  • Not just your computer screen 15 away.

85
This is a really long title for this single
slide, I should have just summarized
  • Hard to read
  • Many people dont read the title anyway
  • Should have been Long Slide Titles

86
Know Slide Boundaries
  • People cant read text that runs off the side of
    the slide

87
Bullets Arent Everything
  • How many
  • Levels of
  • Hierarchy do
  • You think
  • You need To express - Your point?

88
Speelchick
  • How samrt will poeple thikn yuo are?
  • Watch for
  • there/their/theyre
  • too/to/two
  • its/its

89
Picture This
  • There are exceptions, but in general
  • Dont have only text on most of your slides
  • Try to draw diagrams wherever applicable
  • (Well-drawn) pictures easier to understand

90
Example Diagrams
wwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwww
wwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwww
wwwwwwwwwwwwww w wwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwww wwwww
wwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwww
wwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwww w w
  • Compute-intensive sections on hardware
  • Hardware reconfigured for each

FPGA
Source code
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Example Diagrams
wwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwww
wwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwww
wwwwwwwwwwwwww w wwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwww wwwww
wwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwww
wwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwww w w
  • Compute-intensive sections on hardware
  • Hardware reconfigured for each

FPGA
Source code
92
You are not Pixar Studios
  • Previous slide(s) used animation
  • Use only where it is USEFUL
  • Know if presentation system will handle
  • Different versions of PowerPoint, Macs, etc.
  • Or use multiple slides to safely animate
  • Flip-book style

Animation
Use it sparingly
Can
(it can be annoying)
Be Very
Distracting
93
Line Em Up
  • This is a bad drawing
  • Put in some effort

FPGA
CPU
94
The Art of Suspense
95
The Art of Suspense
  • Dont

96
The Art of Suspense
  • Dont
  • Be

97
The Art of Suspense
  • Dont
  • Be
  • A

98
The Art of Suspense
  • Dont
  • Be
  • A
  • Tease

99
Anticipatory Lecturing
  • Dont Be A Tease
  • Let the audience think at their own pace
  • It only provides benefit if theres a surprise
    result

100
Mommy, my eyes are burning!
  • Can you look at this for 45 minutes?
  • Colors look different on every LCD projector
  • Colors look different between transparencies and
    projector
  • Side note if printing slides, may want to choose
    white background to save ink!

101
I See A Ghost
  • More contrast on monitor than projector
  • Different projectors different results
  • Colors to avoid with white are
  • Light Green
  • Light Blue
  • Pale Yellow
  • Your slides should have good contrast

Usually cant read this
102
Contrast Guidelines
  • White background, black text is clearest
  • Can use other (dark) text colors
  • But be careful -- dont be distracting!
  • Make sure to not use light-on-white or
    white-on-light
  • Dont using glaring colors
  • If not an art major, dont have to get fancy

103
Equations
  • Ummm okay

104
Keep It Simple
  • Do you really need all those equations?
  • This is very instance-dependent!
  • Depends on what youre discussing
  • Depends on your audience
  • Sometimes you may need them
  • Explain the variables and what they mean
  • Give a plain-text description of it
  • If you dont need them, dont use them!

105
Use Simple Examples
  • This isnt one. It doesnt help.

106
Results
  • You havelots of coolresults
  • No one canread this
  • No one canunderstand this
  • Graphs areyour friend

107
Graphs Can Also Be The Enemy
108
Pick A Line, Any Line
109
???? 2. ????
1. ??20????????????????
2. ??????????,????????.
3. ??????????????????.
4. ????
???1??????????.
110
How to Give Good Presentations6) Be Clear
  • A) Consider Culture Vocabulary.If you are
    speaking to people from other countries, be
    careful about vocabulary behaviour. It can mean
    something very different to others.
  • CULTURE SHOCK (mine and Korean friends/family)
  • Korea (mother-in law calling my baby kangaji)
  • USA (pumpkincute, wifes experience in church.)
  • Korea (range of doll in America vs. Korea)
  • Singapore (affectionmen touching men)
  • South Africa (Sandy kissing as greeting)

111
How to Give Good Presentations6) Cultural
Sensitivity
  • B) READ ABOUT THE CULTURE"Do your homework. I
    don't care what country I go to, every time
    before I leave, I pull out books and I say, 'OK,
    I've got to check these things out.'" Dr. Lillian
    H. Chaney, co-author of "Global Business
    Etiquette. http//www.worldbusinessculture.com/
    http//www.cyborlink.com/

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How to Give Good Presentations7) Delivery
  • Nerves
  • English/Anguish. You are the expert.
  • Mechanics
  • Eye contact (look at noses)
  • Cue cards or script if desired
  • Variation (media, voice, position, ...)
  • Voice
  • Speak clearly, distinctly
  • To audience, not screen
  • Proper tempo
  • Avoid monotone delivery
  • Posture

112
113
8) Delivery
  • Practice
  • Know your surroundings and equipment
  • Dry run for a test audience and solicit
    constructive feedback
  • Test your equipment first (Bobs experience at
    Seoul National University)
  • Color schemes which look good on the computer
    monitor may look yuckie when projected
  • Time - keep to a schedule
  • Have a backup - if using computer technology,
    always bring standard transparencies just in case
    Murphy strikes

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9) Question and Answer
  • Watch assertions
  • In my opinion.. only works if you are qualified
    to give an opinion. Defer to facts and resources
    when possible.
  • Dont lie
  • Its unethical ! Assume that the audience knows
    everything about the topic -- if you lie and get
    caught, theyll kill you. If you dont know dont
    be afraid to say I dont know. Tell the
    questioner that you do not have the answer right
    now but you would be happy to look it up, or
    discuss the concept with him or her at a later
    time.

115
Layout - 200
True or False It is a good idea to vary the font
face and background images to keep our viewers
interested.
Back
116
Layout - 400
True or False To make sure readers can
understand your message be sure to add enough
text that explains in detail what your
program/code/algorithm/etc. is doing
Back
117
Layout - 600
What is the maximum number of lines of text you
should put on a single slide?
Back
118
Layout - 800
Name at least TWO things that are bad about the
following graph.
Back
119
Potpourri - 200
True or False You should memorize your
presentation so you can deliver it smoothly.
Back
120
Potpourri - 400
True or False Audience attention is usually
high at the beginning of a talk and decreases
toward the end of the talk
Back
121
Potpourri - 600
What is wrong with this slide?
  • Outline of Talk
  • Introduction
  • Proposed solution
  • Design of solution
  • User feedback
  • Results and Conclusion

Back
122
Potpourri - 800
Name at least TWO things that could be improved
on the following slide
Moose Tracker 3000
The moose tracker 3000 project is designed to
track moose in their natural environment. Using
the ISO 9000 protocol we measure the carrying
capacity implemented by the Hanley TGR-49R/Z
method. Moose were selected in the HUD3 range
and monitored by GPS collar for 120 days.
Samples collected by the NDF technique indicate
that the herbivores can metabolize class 3 plants
more efficiently than previously thought.
Back
123
10) AssignmentMake a Presentation
  • I. The Attention Step. Make people
    interested.--Describe one real natural disaster
  • II. The Need Step. Whats the problem?--What are
    the causes and effects of this disaster?
  • III. The Answer Step. Whats the solution?--What
    should we do during this type of disaster?
  • IV. The Visualization Step. --What are the
    benefits/dangers for me?
  • V. The Action Step. What specific things can I
    do?--What specific things can I do to protect
    myself?

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SUMMARYOU TOO CAN PRESENT!
  • Prepare Identify goals obstacles.
  • Research Gather data. Plan strategy.
  • 3) Persuade Use the persuasion process.
  • 4) Dont Plagiarize How to use ideas from others
    honestly.
  • 5) Design Organize information effectively.
  • 6) Be Clear culture, vocabulary, etc.
  • 7) Delivery Present with confidence.
  • 8) Practice makes Perfect
  • 9) Question Answer Time
  • !!!JUST DO ITMANY TIMES!!!

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