Module II - Revelations and Racism- African American Concert Dance - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Module II - Revelations and Racism- African American Concert Dance PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 417e9c-MzdmO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Module II - Revelations and Racism- African American Concert Dance

Description:

Module II - Revelations and Racism- African American Concert Dance Topics for the day: Intro to modern dance Harlem Renaissance and the Minstrel stereotypes – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:364
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 25
Provided by: DavidPo8
Learn more at: http://webpages.scu.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Module II - Revelations and Racism- African American Concert Dance


1
Module II - Revelations and Racism- African
American Concert Dance
  • Topics for the day
  • Intro to modern dance
  • Harlem Renaissance and the Minstrel stereotypes
  • Afro-American pioneers in concert dance
  • Hemsley Winfield and Edna Guy
  • Asadata Dafora and Kykunkor

2
What is concert dance?
  • Philosophy of early modern dance - movement
    joined with soul. An inner statement of spiritual
    belief. Psychic meanings are intuited and felt
    more than literally expressed.
  • Modern is a fine art, intellectual in its
    origins, based on ideas. Challenges a purely
    entertainment aesthetic
  • Creative - movement invention departs from
    ballet. Belief in power of movement was critical.
  • Focus on inner world of experience
  • Dance serves as a vehicle for self awareness, of
    inner motivations. Especially relevant for Af-Am
    culture that was stripped of the connection to
    its culture.

3
Harlem Renaissance and search for identity
  • Pervasive Minstrel Stereotypes
  • Harlem Renaissance - Negro Renaissance power of
    art to challenge stereotypes and reclaim dignity
  • Langston Hughes poet, 1926 article The Negro
    Artist and the Racial Mountain, - Negro artists
    need to create to express their own dark skinned
    heritage without fear or shame, if whites or
    blacks like it ok, if not, ok, they must create
    now as strong as they can.

4
Langston Hughes (1902-1967) poems
  • THE NEGRO SPEAKS OF RIVERS
  • IVE known rivers
  • I've known rivers ancient as the world and older
    than the flow of human blood in human veins.
  • My soul has grown deep like the rivers.
  • I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young.
  • I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to
    sleep.
  • I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids
    above it.
  • I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe
    Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I've seen
    its muddy bosom turn all golden in the sunset.
  • I've known rivers
  • Ancient, dusky rivers.
  • My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

5
Langston Hughes (1902-1967) poems
  • Question
  • When the old junk man Death
  • Comes to gather up our bodies
  • And toss them into the sack of oblivion,
  • I wonder if he will find
  • The corpse of a white multi-millionaire
  • Worth more pennies of eternity,
  • Than the black torso of
  • A Negro cotton-picker?

6
What shall the Negro Dance About
  • Question posed in 1933, Workers Dance League at
    Harlem YMCA, following a performance by Hemsley
    Winfield.
  • Ad Bates - a young Negro should dance about the
    things that are vital to him.
  • Anonymous our dance should express the strivings
    of the New Negro. Thhis term reflects the new
    consciousness of the Harlem Renaissance.

7
The Development of Black Modern Dance in America
Three Phases
  • End the myth of the minstrel presentation of the
    Negro, and the myth that their was no African
    culture. Introduction of authentic African
    Material
  • 2) Black choreographers explore contemporary
    African American culture.
  • Two agendas - kills the minstrel myths and
    celebrate potential for a new art that will grow
    out of the Africanist aesthetic.
  • 3) Freedom to create from total fabric of Black
    experience and to create from within or outside
    of African-American heritage.

8
The Pioneers in Black Concert Dance
  • Helmsley Winfield
  • Edna Guy

9
Edna Guy
10
Asadata Dafara (Horton) native of Sierra Leone
  • Kykunkor The Witch Woman- Dafora was 45 in 1934
    debut
  • Kykunkor - included a series of authentic African
    dances Agunda -dance of joy, Eboe - jester
    dance, Battoo- challenge dance.
  • Kirstein and other critics reflect racist
    stereotypes still in currency.
  • Kykunkor portrayed blacks as human beings- this
    was its revelation and success, Dafora turned
    away stereotypes of African barbarism by
    referring to American lynchings.
  • A huge success - paved way for blacks taken
    seriously in concert dance

11
(No Transcript)
12
(No Transcript)
13
(No Transcript)
14
(No Transcript)
15
(No Transcript)
16
(No Transcript)
17
(No Transcript)
18
(No Transcript)
19
(No Transcript)
20
(No Transcript)
21
Asadata Dafara (Horton) Ostrich Dance
22
92nd St. YMHA presented Negro Dance Evening split
into
  • Part I African
  • Part II West Indies
  • Featuring Edna Guy, Asadata Dafora, young
    Katherine Dunham and Talley Beatty

23
92nd St. YMHA presented Negro Dance Evening split
into
24
(No Transcript)
About PowerShow.com