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Inclusive Excellence, Diversity, and Multicultural Education

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Inclusive Excellence, Diversity, and Multicultural Education By Paul C. Gorski August 2009 I. Introduction: Who We Are Who is in the room? My background and lenses I ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Inclusive Excellence, Diversity, and Multicultural Education


1
Inclusive Excellence, Diversity, and
Multicultural Education
  • By Paul C. Gorski
  • August 2009

2
I. Introduction Who We Are
  • Who is in the room?
  • My background and lenses

3
I. Introduction Primary Arguments
  1. At its heart, inclusive excellence is about
    creating equitable and just learning and working
    environments for all members of a community
  2. Much of what we do in the name of equity and
    justice is inequitable and unjust
  3. Being more authentically equitable and just
    requires attention to several core principles

4
I. Introduction Agenda
  1. Introductory Stuff
  2. Moving Toward Inclusive Excellence
  3. Key Concepts
  4. Key Principles
  5. What We Can Do

5
II. Moving Toward Inclusive Excellence
6
Campus Approaches to Multicultural Education
  1. Celebrating Diversity
  2. Cultural Competence
  3. Human Relations
  4. Equity and Justice

7
1. Celebrating Diversity
  • Characterized by
  • Surface-level cultural activities and programming
    (fashion shows, food fairs)
  • Stereotypical minimalizations of cultures (Taco
    Night)
  • Institutional resistance to addressing diversity
    concerns in ways that dont feel good to most
    privileged groups

8
2. Cultural Competence
  • Characterized by
  • Focus on learning about cultures, often in ways
    that minimize or essentialize cultures (Native
    American culture African American culture)
  • Focus exclusively on those in the minority
    while ignoring systemic power and privilege
  • An expectation that those in disenfranchised
    groups will teach those in privileged groups
    about their culture

9
3. Human Relations
  • Characterized by
  • Structured opportunities for community members
    to come together across differences to hear each
    others experiences (Mix It Up Lunch intergroup
    dialogue)
  • Interpersonal focus rather than institutional
    focus

10
4. Equity and Justice
  • Characterized by
  • Institutional commitment to creating an
    anti-racist, anti-sexist, etc., campus through
    policy and practice
  • Continual institutional assessment of the extent
    to which equity and justice or present
  • Full cultural, social, political, and other
    access by all community members

11
Part III
  • Key Concepts

12
Concept 1 Inclusive
  • Physical inclusiveness is not the same as social
    or cultural inclusiveness
  • An organization is only as inclusive as its most
    excluded member experiences it to be

13
Concept 2 Equity v. Equality
  • The difference
  • Building policy for equity rather than equality

14
Concept 3 Implicit Culture
  • Sometimes called hidden curriculum
  • What are the underlying values and hidden
    messages that form the culture of UW-Superior?
    Who benefits from these and who do they hurt?

15
IV. Key Principles for an Equitable and Just
Campus
16
Principles
  • Authentic inclusion and equity cannot be
    achieved through cultural programming
  • Resources committed to equity and diversity
    should not be used for celebrating diversity,
    but instead for eliminating inequities

17
Principles
  • Inclusive excellence begins with creating an
    equitable and just environment for all members of
    a community, which means we must be against all
    inequity and injustice
  • Racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism/homphobia,
    and so on

18
Principles
  • Exclusion is not just an interpersonal issue.
    Its a systemic issue, often buried in
    tradition or just the way things are
  • This is why its so important to understand the
    implicit culture and who it serves

19
Principles
  • Acting in support of inclusive excellence
    requires that we spend our institutional
    likeability
  • Must be willing to upset people and the
    institution

20
Principles
  • Inclusion and equity require a comprehensive
    assessment and approach
  • So we cant simply add this or that program or
    class to an otherwise inequitable campus
  • Must think about the curriculum, co-curriculum,
    policies, hiring, leadership, and so on

21
Principles
  • In order for a campus to move authentically
    toward inclusive excellence, leadership must be
    actively and authentically involved
  • It never works without a combination of shifts in
    (1) expectations, (2) policy, (3) accountability,
    all from leadership

22
Principles
  • Equity advocates on campus must be empowered to
    fight the fight
  • Too often, the biggest advocates are marginalized
    within a university, but the real shift comes
    when those who support inequity are marginalized

23
Principles
  • Diversity is not about validating all
    perspectives
  • Appreciating diversity doesnt mean respecting
    somebodys homophobia it means eliminating
    homophobia

24
Principles
  • Equity requires us to prioritize justice, not
    peace
  • Peace or conflict resolution without justice is
    injustice and privileges those already in power

25
V. What I Can Do
26
What I Can Do
  • Know and work to eliminate my own biases.

27
What I Can Do
  • Teach and learn about racism, poverty,
    homophobia, and other atrocities.

28
What I Can Do
  • Challenge each other. Strengthen the choir.

29
What I Can Do
  • See and work at intersections
  • Racism and sexism
  • Sexism and heterosexism
  • Heterosexism and classism
  • Classism and environmental destruction

30
What I Can Do
  • Organize
  • Build coalitions among your colleagues or
    classmates when you see change that needs to
    happen

31
What I Can Do
  • Move Beyond the Dialogue
  • Dialogue helps us educate and organize ourselves,
    but dialogue, in and of itself, never creates
    change

32
  • Final Thought
  • The Two Corridors

33
Thank you.
  • Paul C. Gorski
  • gorski_at_edchange.org
  • http//www.edchange.org
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