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Dream-Representation in Wuthering Heights, Crime and punishment, and War and Peace

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Title: Dream-Representation in Wuthering Heights, Crime and punishment, and War and Peace


1
Dream-Representation in Wuthering Heights, Crime
and punishment, and War and Peace
2
  • Interested in how closely these dreams resemble
    actual dreams, particularly in te light of post
    Freudian dream research how successfully
    something that is unreal by definition is made
    part of the fabric of a referential narrative
    and how successfully dreams are made to serve
    authorial intentions to contribute to the
    thematic , symbolic and affective ends of the
    narratives that contain them with out losing
    their verisimilar quality

3
  • 1. Allegorical interpretation, a critical
    procedure validated by Freud Most of the
    artificial dreams are constructed by imaginative
    writers, they reproduce the writers thoughts
    under a disguise which is regarded as harmonizing
    with the recognize characteristics of dreams
  • 2. Considers dreams as a literary device , dreams
    are considered in relation to fictional
    characterization, narrative structure the
    articulation of the authors themes.

4
  • Both approaches have their strong points they
    also have their pitfalls
  • 1. Allegorical interpretaition depends on a
    manifest-latent model and presupposes a hidden or
    secret meaning. While this may be true of some
    dreams it is by no means true for all.
  • 2. emphasis on authorial technique in the other
    approach can lead commentators to assign the
    origin and generation of dreams not to the mental
    life of the dreamer but to the author read into
    it too much

5
Common dreams
  • Dickens shrewdly observed that taking into
    consideration our vast differences in point of
    mental and physical constitution there is a
    remarkable sameness to our dreams eg. We all
    fall off the tower, we all take unheard of
    trouble to go to the theatre and never get in
  • Dickens describes various scenarios for anxiety
    dreams
  • Frequently occurring motif is that something
    menacing outside ins trying to get inside to
    where the dreamer is situated. Eg. The female
    waif Cathy tyring to break through the window
    in Lockwoods dream
  • Another less common kind of dream is hypnagogic
    dreaming this occurs in a twilight setting that
    mixes normally separate features of sleep and
    wakefulness, often ending in an external
    situation that terminates the dream eg. The
    zealous preacher rapping on the boards of his
    pulpit at the climax of Lockwoods first dram ,
    which is discovered to be the sound of a tree
    branch knocking against the window
  • Day remnants dreams where what we perceive in
    the day transfers into our dreams Nineteenth
    century realist fiction is particularly well
    suited to show the presence of day remnants in
    dreams and consequently both to augment the
    reality effect and to link these representations
    with the narrative

6
Lockwood's dreams
  • Forced by bad weather to spend the night at
    Wuthering Heights, Lockwood notes that the name
    Catherine has been scratched on the ledge three
    times , each time with a different last name. He
    also discovers books inscribed Catherine Earnshaw
    with white spaces of which have been used for a
    child's diary entries. Just before falling asleep
    he notices that one of the works is a pious
    discourse by the Reverend Jabe Branderham.
  • First dream Day remanet Lockwood attends a
    sermon of Branderham on the same subject as the
    printed discourse, the dream is lifelike as
    Lockwood has read in Catherines diary of a three
    hour religious service she had been forced to
    attend
  • Kermode observed that the dream was a trick as
    its role seems merely to suggest through
    contiguity that Lockwoods next dream is a
    similarly convincing dream representation
  • Second dream anxiety dream Catherine tries
    to break through the window and enter the
    panelled bed. This dream has thematic
    implications , raises subject of the existence of
    transcendent spirits
  • A naturalistic explanation is that she exists
    only in Lockwoods dream, supernatural
    possibility is that the spirit of Catherine lives
    and that Heathcliff may one day be reunited with
    her.
  • Dream seems inauthentic. it has a feeling of a
    literary device intended to reveal secrets about
    the past before the novel begins, and to set a
    particular emotional tone..and is not
    convincingly a product of Lockwoods psyche and
    would be more plausible if assigned to Heathcliff
    White Lewis
  • Lockwoods dreams look like intense signifying
    nodes demanding the readers closest attention,
    but upon examination they are found to by of
    limited import and limited impact. Although the
    second foreground an important theme, its
    equivocal status dilutes its import concerning
    the equivocal status of transcendent spirits. And
    while there is plenty of sound and fury in both
    dreams, there is not enough signifying to justify
    the pyrotechnics.
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