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NC Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

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NC Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Department Overview and Costs presented to the Cost Working Group Robin Jenkins, Chief Operating Officer – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: NC Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention


1
  • NC Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention
  • Department Overview and Costs
  • presented to the Cost Working Group
  • Robin Jenkins, Chief Operating Officer
  • William Lassiter, Director of Communications

2
Department Overview
3
Department Vision and Mission
  • Our Vision A seamless, comprehensive juvenile
    justice system which provides the most effective
    services to youth and their families at the right
    time in the most appropriate settings.
  • Our Mission To promote public safety and
    juvenile delinquency prevention, intervention,
    and treatment through the operation of a
    seamless, comprehensive juvenile justice system.

4
Department Goals
  • To promote public safety as the cornerstone of
    North Carolina's juvenile justice system.
  • To promote juvenile delinquency prevention,
    intervention, and treatment at the state and
    community levels so that juvenile crime and
    delinquency are reduced.
  • To further develop and maintain a comprehensive,
    quality-focused juvenile justice system driven by
    research and evidence-based practices in all
    budgetary components of the department.

5
Overview of Comprehensive Strategy for Juvenile
Justice
6
Department Costs FY 08-09 Cost Units for DJJDP
Services
  • Community Programs
  • Juvenile Crime Prevention Council Programs
  • Annual cost per youth 1,441.69
  • Annual DJJDP cost per youth 740.57
  • Eckerd Wilderness Camps
  • Daily cost per youth 134.94 
  • Multipurpose Juvenile Homes
  • Daily cost per youth 190.07

7
Department Costs FY 08-09 Cost Units for DJJDP
Services
  • Community Programs Continued
  • Juvenile Crime Prevention Council Demonstration
    Projects Average Annual Cost per youth 6,566

8
Department Costs FY 08-09 Cost Units for DJJDP
Services
  • Court Services
  • Cost per intake 175.09
  • Juvenile Court Counseling Offices perform the
    role of the adult court magistrate
  • Average daily cost for supervision per youth
    8.06

9
Department Costs FY 08-09 Cost Units for DJJDP
Services
  • Detention Centers (state-operated)
  • Average Daily Cost 196
  • Average Annual Cost 71,466
  • Youth Development Centers (YDCs)
  • Average Daily Cost 282
  • Average Annual Cost 102,854

10
Department Costs Cost Units for DJJDP Services
  • Camp Woodsons total budget 1,120,007
  • Average Daily Cost based on Average Daily
    Population 343

11
Department Costs FY 08-09 Miscellaneous Costs,
Not Included in Cost Unit Calculations
  • Special Initiatives 8,794,423
  • (Support Our Students, One-on-One Mentoring and
    CPSV eliminated at the end of FY 08-09)
  • Administration 8,271,500 (5 of DJJDP budget)
  • Transportation 1,426,387 (secure custody
    youth)
  • County Detention 3,037,717 (This is the
    reimbursement we provide to county run
    facilities)
  • Youth Development Centers 5,465,367
  • (cost includes costs to open new facilities,
    RIFs, and one time equipment costs)

12
DJJDP System Overview
  • DJJDP had 1,973 full time equivalent (FTE)
    positions in FY 08-09 down to 1,882 in FY 09-10
  • 1,628 in the field in various positions to
    include
  • 589.5 Court Services (Court Counselors,
    Supervisors, Chiefs, Area Administrators, and
    Support staff)
  • 10 Regional Consultants for Juvenile Crime
    Prevention Councils/Community Programs (there are
    99 JCPCs and a myriad of community placement
    options)

13
DJJDP System Overview Juvenile Crime Prevention
Councils
  • 99 Juvenile Crime Prevention Councils
  • 582 programs plus an additional 65 gang
    assessments/programs that employ approximately
    1,250 people
  • Served nearly 30,000 juveniles statewide in FY
    08-09
  • These programs along with other community
    initiatives have been able to prevent juvenile
    crime which is at a ten year low

14
DJJDP System Overview
  • 1,161 Staff associated with Facilities
  • Includes Professional Staff both regionally and
    in the facilities
  • And, ancillary and other staff across the Dept
    (including maintenance, cooks, Business Officers,
    transportation drivers, processing and
    administrative assistants, etc.)
  • 149 in the Central Office to support the field
    (7.6 of workforce supporting 92 of field
    services)

15
Complaints Received CY 2000-2009 (Delinquent and
Undisciplined Complaints)
15.9 Decrease
16
Juvenile Crime Rate CY 2000 - 2009 Rate is of
Delinquent Complaints Received per 1,000
juveniles age 6-15. Juvenile Crime Rate in NC has
decreased 18.5 from 2000 to 2009.
17
NC Juvenile Crime Facts
  • Approximately 2-3 of juvenile crime each year
    are for A-E felonies
  • Approximately 69 of complaints received are for
    misdemeanor offenses and 12 are for infractions
    or status offenses
  • Of complaints received annually, approximately
    75 are committed by males

18
Complaints Received CY 2009 N40,432
19
Top Ten Juvenile Offenses CY 2009
Charged Offense Offenses
Simple assault 4,135
Larceny - misdemeanor 3,126
Simple affray 1,805
Breaking and or entering - felony 1,601
Disorderly conduct at school 1,525
Injury to real property 1,440
Ungovernable lt16 1,236
Communicating threats 1,219
Truant lt 16 1,140
Larceny after breaking or entering 1,041
TOTAL 18,286
The top 10 juvenile offenses account for 45 of
complaints received in 2009.
20
DJJDPs Current Budget
  • Certified Budgets
  • 09-10 148,752,858 (8 reduction from 08-09)
  • An Additional 4 was held back by The Office of
    Budget and Management or an additional 5.92
    Million. Remaining allocation 142,672,000
  • 10-11 147,183,945 (9 reduction from 08-09)

21
DJJDPs Budget History
Current budget proposals would cut the Department
another 5 -6 Million
22
NC Youth Population and DJJDP Allocation Trends
2000-2010
23
  • Community Programs

24
Community Programs
  • Juvenile Crime Prevention Councils
  • Multipurpose Juvenile Homes
  • Eckerd Wilderness Education Program
  • Project Challenge
  • Juvenile Assessment Center
  • Alternatives to Commitment

25
  • Juvenile Crime Prevention Councils

26
JCPC Program Costs FY 08-09
  • Total JCPC Budget 41,500,417
  • (Includes local match in-kind contributions)
  • DJJDP expenditure (true cost) 21,318,047
  • Number of participants 28,786
  • Average cost per youth 1,441.69
  • Average DJJDP cost per youth 740.57
  • JCPC Demonstration Projects 748,570

27
JCPC Program Costs
  • Residential Programs
  • Average cost per youth 7,134.78
  • Average DJJDP cost per youth 2,689
  • Assessment Programs
  • Average cost per youth 1,258.87
  • Average DJJDP cost per youth 884
  • Restorative Programs
  • Average cost per youth 808.62
  • Average DJJDP cost per youth 557

28
JCPC Program Costs
  • Clinical Treatment Programs
  • Average cost per youth 3,641.11
  • Average DJJDP cost per youth 1,343
  • Structured Activities
  • Average cost per youth 1,230.93
  • Average DJJDP cost per youth 707
  • JCPC Demonstration Projects
  • Average cost per youth 6,566
  • Average DJJDP cost per youth 6,411

29
  • Multipurpose Juvenile Homes

30
Multipurpose Juvenile Homes
  • The program has been contracted to Methodist Home
    for Children since 1993
  • All youth received in the Multipurpose Homes are
    referred by their local juvenile court and range
    in age from 11 to 17
  • Two-thirds of youth admitted are still enrolled
    in school but are performing poorly in all
    academic pursuits

31
Multipurpose Juvenile Home Program Department of
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Winton Home Judicial Dist. 6A6B
Edenton Home Judicial Dist. 1 2


Alleghany
Northampton
Warren
Ashe
Gates
Surry
Camden
Caswell
Currituck
Person
Rockingham
Vance
Hertford
Stokes

Pasquotank
Granville
1
Halifax
Watauga
Wilkes
Perquimans
1
Yadkin
Chowan
Forsyth

Avery
Franklin
Bertie
Guilford
Alamance
Orange
Durham
Mitchell

Nash
Caldwell
Alexander
Davie
Edgecombe
Yancey
Madison
Iredell
Martin
Washington
Tyrrell
Davidson
Wake
Burke
Chatham
Dare
Wilson
Mcdowell
Randolph
Catawba
Rowan

Buncombe
Pitt
Beaufort
Haywood
Johnston
Greene
Hyde
Lincoln
Swain
Cabarrus
Lee
Rutherford
Harnett
Wayne
Graham
Henderson
Montgomery
Stanly

Moore
Polk
Cleveland
Gaston

Jackson
Mecklenburg
Lenoir
Transylvania
Craven
Macon
Cherokee
Pamlico

Clay
Cumberland
Hoke
Jones
Richmond
Union
Anson
Sampson
Duplin

4
Scotland
Onslow
Carteret

Franklin Home Judicial District 30
Robeson
Bladen

Pender
Columbus
New Hanover


Brunswick

Lumberton Home Judicial Dist. 16A16B
Goldsboro Home Judicial Dist. 8
32
Multipurpose Juvenile Homes
  • Homes daily cost for 08-09 was 190.07 

33
  • Eckerd Wilderness Education Program

34
Eckerd Wilderness Education Program
  • Since 1978, EYA has contracted with NC to provide
    Foster Care Camp services to youth with
    behavioral, emotional, and delinquency problems
  • For the current fiscal year, EYA is operating 5
    Wilderness Camps providing 275 beds for males and
    females. Youth must be at least 10 and no older
    than 16.5 at time of screening
  • The camps provide staff secure, residential
    therapeutic programs as an alternative to more
    restrictive settings

35
Eckerd Wilderness Education Program Camps and
Regions in North Carolina Eckerd Youth
Alternatives, Inc.
North Central Boys
Northeast Boys
Alleghany
Camden
Northwest Co-Ed
Northampton
Ashe
Gates
Stokes
Surry
Currituck
Person
Caswell
Rockingham
Vance
Warren
Pasquotank
Granville
Hertford
1
Halifax
Watauga
Wilkes
Perquimans
1
Yadkin
Chowan
Forsyth
Orange
Franklin
Bertie
Mitchell
Guilford
Avery

Alamance
Nash
Durham
Caldwell
Alexander
Davie
Edgecombe
Yancey
Madison
Tyrrell
Iredell
Martin
Davidson
Wake
Washington
Burke
Dare
Chatham
Randolph
Wilson
Catawba
McDowell
Rowan
Swain
Buncombe
Pitt
Beaufort
Haywood
Hyde
Johnston
Greene
Lincoln
Lee
Rutherford
Cabarrus
Harnett
Henderson
Montgomery
Graham
Jackson
Stanly
Wayne
Moore
Gaston
Cleveland
Polk
Lenoir
Craven
Mecklenburg
Transylvania
Cumberland
Macon
Pamlico
Cherokee

Clay
Hoke
Richmond
Jones
Union
Anson
Sampson
Duplin
Scotland
Carteret
Onslow
South Central Co-Ed
Robeson
Southeast Boys
Pender
Bladen
North Central Camp Boys Kathi
Grenough, Director Camp E-MUN-TALEE 235 Ramey
Orchard Road Lowgap, NC 27024 336-352-3111
Northwest Camp Co-Ed Daniel
Wanta, Director Camp E-MA-ETU 4654 High Rock
Road Boomer, NC 28606 336-921-3300
New Hanover
Columbus

Brunswick
Southeast Camp Boys Ted
Wisniewski, Director Camp E-TIK-ETU 1086 Susie
Sand Hill Road Elizabethtown, NC
28337 910-588-4407
South Central Camp Co-Ed Erica
Cook, Director Camp E-KU-SUMEE 500 E-KU-SUMEE
Drive Candor, NC 27229 910-974-4183

Northeast Camp
Boys Karla Kiburz, Director Camp E-TEN-ETU 633
Shepards Way Lane Manson, NC 27553 252-456-2900
Revised 9-02-09
36
Eckerd Wilderness Education Program Camps Serving
Females in North Carolina Eckerd Youth
Alternatives, Inc.
Camden
Northwest Co-Ed
Alleghany
Northampton
Gates
Ashe
Stokes
Surry
Currituck
Person
Caswell
Rockingham
Vance
Warren
Pasquotank
Granville
Hertford
1
Halifax
Watauga
Wilkes
Perquimans
Yadkin
1
Chowan
Forsyth
Orange
Franklin
Bertie
Mitchell
Guilford
Avery

Alamance
Nash
Durham
Caldwell
Alexander
Davie
Edgecombe
Yancey
Madison
Tyrrell
Iredell
Martin
Davidson
Wake
Washington
Burke
Dare
Chatham
Randolph
Wilson
Catawba
McDowell
Rowan
Swain
Buncombe
Pitt
Haywood
Beaufort
Hyde
Johnston
Greene
Lincoln
Lee
Rutherford
Cabarrus
Harnett
Henderson
Montgomery
Graham
Jackson
Stanly
Wayne
Moore
Gaston
Cleveland
Polk
Lenoir
Craven
Mecklenburg
Transylvania
Cumberland
Macon
Pamlico
Cherokee

Clay
Hoke
Richmond
Jones
Union
Anson
Sampson
Duplin
Scotland
Carteret
Onslow
South Central Co-Ed
Robeson
Pender
Bladen
New Hanover
South Central Camp Co-Ed Erica
Cook, Director Camp E-KU-SUMEE 500 E-KU-SUMEE
Drive Candor, NC 27229 910-974-4183
Northwest Camp Co-Ed Daniel
Wanta, Director Camp E-MA-ETU 4654 High Rock
Road Boomer, NC 28606 336-921-3300
Columbus

Brunswick

Revised 9/3/09
37
Eckerd Wilderness Education Program Costs
  • Eckerd daily rate for 08-09 was 134.94 

38
  • JCPC Demonstration Projects

39
JCPC Demonstration Projects
  • The purpose is to provide alternatives to
    commitment services locally through JCPCs for
    youth who have been committed to, or who
    potentially may be committed to, youth
    development centers 
  • Prescriptive service planning
  • Community-based services
  • Wrap-around services
  • Strong collaboration with court personnel

40
NC Department of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention JCPC Demonstration
Projects FY 2009-2010
Dare County Schools (Safe Systems)
Alleghany
Currituck
Northampton
Warren
Ashe
Gates
Stokes
Surry
Camden
Caswell
Person
Rockingham
Vance
Hertford
Pasquotank
Granville
Halifax
Watauga
Wilkes
Perquimans
Yadkin
Chowan
Alamance
Forsyth
Orange
Avery
Franklin
Bertie
Guilford
Mitchell
Durham
Nash
Caldwell
Alexander
Davie
Edgecombe
Yancey
Madison
Iredell
Martin
Washington
Davidson
Tyrrell
Wake
Burke
Dare
Chatham
Randolph
Wilson
Catawba
Beaufort
Buncombe
McDowell
Rowan
Pitt
Haywood
Johnston
Hyde
Lincoln
Swain
Greene
Lee
Rutherford
Harnett
Cabarrus
Wayne
Graham
Henderson
Stanly
Gaston
Moore
Polk
Cleveland
Jackson
Montgomery
Mecklenburg
Lenoir
Craven
Macon
Cherokee
Pamlico
Transylvania
Clay
Cumberland
Hoke
Jones
Richmond
Anson
Sampson
Duplin
Union
Scotland
Carteret
Onslow
Alamance County Dispute Settlement and Youth
Services Cumberland County CommuniCare,
Inc. Dare County Schools Family Services of
Davidson County Appalachian Family
Innovations Methodist Home for Children Onslow
County Youth Services Rockingham County Youth
Services
Robeson
Bladen
Pender
New Hanover
Columbus
Onslow County Youth Services (Day Services)
Brunswick

LEGEND JCPC Demonstration Project Sponsoring
Agency
Methodist Home for Children (Family Preservation
Services)
41
JCPC Demonstration Projects
  • Seventy percent (70) of the youth exiting the
    projects completed their programming at a high or
    acceptable level of participation and achievement
    of behavior improvement goals
  • The average annual cost per youth in the
    Demonstration Projects in FY 2008-2009 was 6,566
    while the average annual cost per youth during
    the same fiscal year in a youth development
    center was 102,854

42
  • Court Services

43
Role of the Court Counselor
  • Intake
  • Information gathering/assessment
  • Determination of legal sufficiency
  • Diversion plans and contracts
  • Detention
  • Recommendations to court
  • Service planning
  • Supervision and case management

44
(No Transcript)
45
General Info About Supervision FY 08-09
  • DJJDP Court Services consists of
  • 427 Juvenile Court Counselors (JCCs)
  • 38 Supervising Counselors (who manage and review
    cases for JCCs)
  • 38 Chief Court Counselors in 39 court districts
  • 74 support staff to assist Court Services daily
    operations

46
General Info About Supervision
  • The average caseload in FY 08-09 was 27 juveniles
    per JCC
  • The average statewide caseload in FY 08-09 was
    9,497.5 juveniles
  • The average length of stay of court-ordered
    supervision for juveniles whose supervision ended
    in FY 08-09 was 365 days

47
DJJDP Court Services
  • Juveniles with complaints approved for court who
    are adjudicated delinquent and/or undisciplined
    are judicially ordered to supervision by DJJDP.
  • There are 6 types and 4 levels of supervision

48
Types of Supervision
  • Supervision Types
  • Diversion (not court-ordered)
  • Protective Supervision
  • Probation
  • Commitment
  • Post-Release Supervision (PRS)
  • Other Supervision

49
Levels of Supervision
  • Supervision Levels
  • Modified
  • Standard
  • Intensive
  • Interstate

50
What proportion of youth are served in each type
of Supervision?
  • In FY 08-09

51
What proportion of youth are served in each level
of Supervision?
  • In FY 08-09

52
Court Services Costs
  • Average cost for an intake is 175.09
  • Average daily cost for supervision is 8.06

53
Transportation Services
54
Transportation Services
  • With mandated hearings, transportation to and
    from court
  • Medical appointments
  • Mental Health Appointments
  • Transfer youth between centers for population
    management
  • Transfer committed youth to Youth Development
    Centers

55
Transportation Costs FY 08-09
  • Department expenditure for transportation
    services 1,426,387 (this cost includes
    reimbursement to law enforcement agencies)

56
Detention Overview
57
Detention Services
  • Provide secure custody for juveniles who are
    ordered by the court to be detained
  • Pending an adjudication hearing
  • Felony offense is alleged
  • Offense that includes assault is alleged
  • Runaway from home (up to 24 hours to facilitate
    return to the parent)
  • Failure to appear
  • Protective Custody

58
Detention Services
  • After adjudication
  • Pending disposition
  • Pending placement as part of a disposition
  • As a dispositional option (confinement as a
    sanction)
  • After transfer to superior court, awaiting trial
  • Absconders from other states through Interstate
    Compact

59
Detention Services
  • Young people in secure custody must have hearings
    to determine the need for continued custody.
  • Five days after the initial admission
  • Intervals of 10 days during on-going detention

60
Detention History
  • Established statewide in response to federal
    legislation mandating that juvenile and adult
    offenders be separated.
  • By 1980 there were 7 county juvenile detention
    centers in NC, and 1 state-run regional detention
    center. Juveniles in other counties were detained
    in local jails.
  • As of July 1 1983, all juveniles had to be housed
    in juvenile detention centers.

61
(No Transcript)
62
Detention Services
  • Education
  • Mental health screenings
  • Physical health screenings
  • Recreation
  • Clinical Chaplain services
  • Psycho-educational groups
  • Substance abuse services

63
Detention Admission Process
  • Juvenile admission can occur 24-hours a day any
    day of the year.
  • Inventory of personal items
  • Strip search for contraband
  • Shower
  • Mental health/suicide screening
  • Physical health screening
  • Orientation

64
Schedule
  • Breakfast
  • Cleaning of rooms
  • 4 hours of instructional services
  • Lunch
  • 4 hours of instructional services
  • Recreation
  • Quiet time
  • Supper
  • Showers
  • Groups, counseling, activities with volunteers
  • Approved Visitation/phone calls
  • Free time with books, games, activities
  • Bedtime starting at 800 PM by Levels

65
Detention Admissions CY 2005 CY
2009 Approximately 5,000 distinct juveniles per
year are admitted to detention. These numbers
reflect admissions to State and County facilities.
66
Detention Costs FY 08-09
  • Average Annual Cost (based on Average Daily
    Population) 71,466
  • Average Daily Cost (based on Average Daily
    Population) 196
  • There are currently 194 beds in state-run
    detention centers (78 county beds)

67
Youth Development Centers
68
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69
Commitment Status
  • Level III Disposition-Most restrictive option
  • Serious, Violent or Chronic offenders
  • Committed to the Department for 24-hour
    supervision, control and treatment
  • Minimum of 6 months in Commitment status

70
Commitment Status
  • Maximum commitment until 90 days prior to 18th,
    19th or 21st birthday
  • Followed by Post-Release Supervision
  • Commitment period based on treatment needs of the
    juvenile and public safety

71
Youth Development Center Service Domains
  • Medical services
  • Education services
  • Nutrition services
  • Mental health services
  • Clinical Chaplain services
  • Social work services
  • Recreation services
  • Habilitation services
  • Family services

72
Youth Development Centers Process
  • Evidence-based assessment
  • Individualized service planning
  • Community reintegration
  • MH/SA treatment
  • Medical treatment
  • Education - PEP/IEP
  • Interpersonal skill building
  • Pro-social value development
  • Vocational skill development

73
Youth Development Centers
  • Service planning Team
  • Membership
  • Juvenile
  • Parent/guardian
  • Court counselor
  • YDC staff
  • Community stakeholders
  • Meeting Schedule
  • At least once every 30 days
  • Coordinated by the juveniles assigned social
    worker

74
Youth Development Center Service Delivery
  • Evidence-based interventions (eg. CBT, MET, ART)
  • Community placements as appropriate
  • Development of specialized programming
  • Complex trauma treatment
  • Vocational training
  • Aggressive/violent youth

75
New Youth Development Centers opened in 2008
  • Edgecombe, Lenoir, Chatham, and Cabarrus
  • Self Contained 8 Bed Units
  • Design requires a low staff to student ratio for
    security
  • -Small Living/Learning Groups
  • Security Features
  • Staff ratio lends itself to
  • intensive programming

76
Youth Development Center Trends
  • The average length of stay in Youth Development
    Centers 11 years ago (1998) was 248 days. By
    2009, the average had increased to 377 days.
  • The average daily population in 1998 was 925
    juveniles. YDC commitments have drastically
    decreased, as the 2009 average daily population
    was 429.
  • The average rate of commitment in 2009 was 0.37
    per 1,000 juveniles age 10-17.

77

Youth Development Center Commitment Trends FY
1998-2009
78
Current Youth Development Center Population On
3/15/2010
79
Youth Development Center Costs FY 08-09
  • Average Annual Cost (based on Average Daily
    Population) 102,854
  • Average Daily Cost (based on Average Daily
    Population) 282
  • Current funded capacity is 402 YDCs beds

80
  • Questions

81
  • Additional Information

82
Levels of Supervision
  • Standard SupervisionMost common
  • Face-to-Face contacts as follows
  • Juveniles parent/guardian shall be contacted
    within the first 15 calendar days
  • Juvenile shall be visited in the home/residence
    within the first 15 calendar days

83
Standard Supervision (cont)
  • Contact with the juvenile in any location, at
    least once every 30 calendar days.
  • Contact with the parent/guardian at least once
    every 60 calendar days.

84
Modified Supervision
  • Modified supervision is often used for juveniles
    who are placed outside of the resident county
    (i.e. group home placement, commitment, etc.)
  • Juveniles parent/guardian shall be contacted
    face-to-face within the first 15 calendar days,
    thereafter at least every 60 calendar days.

85
Modified Supervision (cont.)
  • Face-to-face contact with the juvenile in the
    home/residence within 15 calendar days,
    thereafter within at least every 90 calendar
    days.
  • Face-to-face contact with the juvenile in any
    location at least every 60 days.

86
Intensive Supervision
  • The Court Counselor consults with the Chief Court
    Counselor at least once than every 15 days
    regarding service delivery and supervision level
    assignment.
  • The parent/guardian is contacted immediately
    after the juvenile is assigned to intensive
    supervision.
  • The maximum caseload of intensive supervision
    cases is 12 per court counselor.

87
Intensive Supervision (cont.)
  • A Child and Family Team consultation occurs
    within the first 30 calendar days while under
    this supervision level.
  • The juvenile receives 3 face-to-face contacts per
    7 calendar days, at least 1 of the contacts
    occurs outside of school hours and/or on the
    weekend.
  • The parent/guardian receives 1 face-to-face
    contact per 7 calendar days.

88
Outgoing Interstate
  • The court counselor is responsible for collecting
    a wealth of court and personal information on the
    currently supervised juvenile AND coordinating
    with the receiving state for Cooperative
    Supervision.
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