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Is this Bullying? A Guide for Parents of Elementary School Students

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Is this Bullying? A Guide for Parents of Elementary School Students For a behavior to be deemed bullying , it needs to include ALL of the following elements as ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Is this Bullying? A Guide for Parents of Elementary School Students


1
Is this Bullying?A Guide for Parents of
Elementary School Students
  • For a behavior to be deemed bullying, it needs
    to include ALL of the following elements as
    defined by Massachusetts State Law

2
  • Must be repeated action(s) by one or more
    students
  • Must be written, verbal or electronic expression
    or a
  • physical act or gesture or any combination
    thereof
  • Must be directed at a victim so that it causes
    one or more of
  • the following
  • physical or emotional harm to the victim
  • damage to victims property
  • places the victim in reasonable fear of harm to
    himself
  • creates a hostile environment at school for
    victim
  • substantially disrupts the education process or
    orderly
  • operation of a school

3
One-time incidents may be deliberately mean or
cruel but they are not bullying. When these
incidents are brought to the attention of school
personnel, they are subject to school discipline
per policy and under the discretion of the school
Principal.
  • We always want students to feel safe and
  • secure, We operate under the core values
  • and mission of the Swampscott Public Schools.
  • Teach pro-social behaviors age appropriate
  • instruction on bullying prevention
  • School counselors
  • Resources within school system and community

4
District Bullying Task Force
  • All Principals
  • First meeting August 20, 2010
  • Assessing needs and resources
  • Handbook changes
  • Professional Development
  • Specific Bullying Prevention Approaches

5
Reporting and Respondingto bullying and
retaliation
  • Staff, students, parents or guardians, etc.
  • Oral or written record
  • and the response
  • Before investigating, assess immediate safety of
    alleged target
  • Notify parents/guardians of the target and the
    aggressor
  • Law enforcement if principal suspects criminal
    charges

6
Investigationby Principal or Designee
  • Retaliation is prohibited
  • Is remedial action required
  • Parents/guardians of target and aggressor
    notified what action to prevent further acts
  • Confidentiality of student records No
    discussion of disciplinary action

7
Parents School Prevention
  • at home and at school
  • Promote and model respectful ways and language
  • Foster an understanding of and respect for
    diversity and difference
  • Teach positive communication skills, anger
    management skills, and empathy for others
  • Prevent, intervene early, and respond effectively

8
Bullying
  • A person is being bullied or victimized when he
    or she is exposed repeatedly and over time to
    negative actions on the part of one or more
    persons. (Olweus, 1991)
  • Bullying is longstanding violence, physical or
    psychological conducted by an individual or a
    group and directed against an individual who is
    not able to defend himself in the actual
    situation. (Roland, 1989)
  • Bullying is when one person uses power in a
    willful manner with the aim of hurting another
    individual repeatedly. (Garrity et. Al. 1997)
  • Bullying is the willful conscious desire to hurt
    another and put him/her under stress. (Tattum,
    1998)
  • A bully is anyone who uses a position of relative
    power to direct negative intent against another
    person. ( Cox)

9
Bullying
  • Power imbalance
  • Bullys intent to harm
  • Victims distress
  • Repeated over time
  • Reputations and power differential consolidates
    over time

10
Bullying Myth or Fact?
  • Both boys and girls bully but tactics differ.
  • Bullies are not anxious and have positive
    self-images.
  • Bullies are not loners.
  • Bullies tend to be at average or slightly below
    average academically.
  • Bullies come in all sizes.
  • Bullies lack compassion.
  • Bullies value the reward they receive from
    aggression.
  • There is no main reason.

Adapted from Bully-Proofing Your School. A
Comprehensive Approach for Elementary Schools
(Second Edition), 2000
11
Bullying Myth or Fact?
  • Returned aggression is not usually effective.
  • Requesting adult intervention will help equalize
    the power imbalance.
  • When bullies are confronted their power is
    defused.
  • Teachers can learn to handle a bully.
  • Bullies can separate home from school.
  • Bullying behavior requires specific intervention
    techniques.
  • It is not good to bring parents of the bully and
    the victim together.

Adapted from Bully-Proofing Your School. A
Comprehensive Approach for Elementary Schools
(Second Edition), 2000
12
Bullying Myth or Fact?
  • The cycle of victimization can be broken.
  • The responsibility for the aggression is the
    bullies.
  • Students with special learning needs may be at
    greater risk of being bullied.

Adapted from Bully-Proofing Your School. A
Comprehensive Approach for Elementary Schools
(Second Edition), 2000
13
Research on Bullying
  • 20-35 of children report being involved in
    bullying
  • 73 of teachers report they usually intervene
  • 25 of students report that teachers intervene
  • bullying generally hidden from adults
  • children under-report bullying
  • 75 of bullies are boys
  • bullying peaks in 11-12 age group
  • common locations are playground, hallways,
    classrooms, lunchrooms and washrooms
  • bullying not influenced by socioeconomic status

14
Forms of Bullying
Physical Verbal Relational Reactive
  • Indirect Bullying
  • name-calling
  • taunting
  • rumor
  • gossiping
  • arguing
  • withdrawing friendship
  • silent treatment
  • exclusion
  • Direct Bullying
  • shoving and poking
  • throwing things
  • taking things
  • slapping and hitting
  • punching and kicking
  • beating

15
Normal Conflict Vs Bullying
  • Normal Conflict
  • Equal power-friends
  • Happens occasionally
  • Accidental
  • Not serious
  • Equal emotional reaction
  • Not seeking power or attention
  • Not trying to get something
  • Remorse-take responsibility
  • Effort to solve the problem
  • Bullying
  • Imbalance of power not friends
  • Repeated negative actions
  • Purposeful
  • Serious-threat of physical harm or emotional or
    psychological hurt
  • Seeking power, control
  • Trying to gain material things or power
  • No remorse-blames victim
  • No effort to solve the problem

16
Understanding the Victim
  • Victims are not randomly targeted
  • tend to be anxious, insecure and lacking in
    social skills
  • usually a loner and isolated from the group
  • may be small or physically weak
  • cry easily and nonassertive
  • may have a physical or learning disability

17
Understanding the Bully
  • Strong confident, impulsive and
  • aggressive
  • low verbal intelligence and school achievement
  • same age or slightly older than victim
  • family dysfunction
  • not empathic or remorseful
  • bullying thrill, power, control
  • violence OK way to solve conflict

18
School-Wide Planthe benefits
  • Collaborative
  • is proactive not punitive
  • creates a shared understanding about bullying and
    its affects
  • assists a school community with the skills and
    language to respond
  • provides a framework for action
  • directs an array of interventions

19
Parents can ...
  • Actively support your child
  • model respect, understanding and non-aggression
  • encourage talk about school and friends
  • help build your childs confidence
  • teach increased responsibility
  • avoid overprotecting your child
  • help your child acquire better social skills
  • report victimization to the school
  • assert your childs right not to be harassed
  • talk with your childs teacher
  • ask to see a copy of the schools values
    statements(code of conduct) or policy on bullying

20
Caring and Respectful Schools
A Shared Responsibiltiy
Bullying Prevention
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