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If children live with tolerance, they learn to be patient

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If children live with tolerance, they learn to be patient Theme: Civic education Emotion Scale Civics The Newbury House Dictionary of American English ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: If children live with tolerance, they learn to be patient


1
If children live with tolerance, they learn to be
patient
  • Theme Civic education

2
Emotion Scale
LONELY GRATEFUL HAPPY
LONELY HAPPY
SAD ANGRY
SAD PROUD ANGRY
3
Civics
  • The Newbury House Dictionary of American
    English
  • Civics is a branch of political science that
    deals with the rights and responsibilities of
    citizens

4
A Learning Chart
What I know already about What Id like to know about What I learned about
? ?
5
Molecule Worksheet
CIVIC EDUCATION
6
Molecule Worksheet
Goodwill
Diversity
Civic democracy
  • Civic
  • education

Tolerance
Trust
7
The Declaration of Principles on Tolerance
  • The first step in tolerance education is to
    teach people what their shared rights and freedom
    are, so that they be respected, and to promote
    the will to protect those of others.

8
Word-puzzles
  • Tolerance,
  • intolerance,
  • injustice,
  • assumption,
  • discrimination,
  • bias, diversity,
  • ethnicity,
  • stereotype,
  • behavior,
  • belief

9
  • stereotype,
  • bias,
  • race,
  • ethnicity,
  • assumption,
  • diversity

10
PRACTICING TOLERANCE
  • I think tolerance means to respect other people's
    beliefs instead of criticizing them about what
    they believe in. It means that you can play with
    children your skin color and other children's
    skin colors. Because someone has a different skin
    color doesn't mean they will hurt you or that
    they are lower class.
  • If you can't learn to work with people with other
    skin colors or beliefs, then you probably won't
    get very far in the future. Everyone is special
    no matter what color they are and what they
    believe in. Everybody is created equal.

11
PRACTICING TOLERANCE
  • What I learned is going to affect me right now
    because I have learned that it's not right to
    discriminate against someone of another color or
    belief. I can also set good examples for people
    who are stereotyping other people and their
    beliefs. I can also learn to work well with
    people of a different race or belief so that in
    the future, I can work even better with people
    like that when I have a job.
  • If God wanted us all to look the same and have
    the same belief, He would have made us that way.
    But He didn't because life would be boring.

12
Derby Writing
  • When you are best to others, you are best to
    yourself.

13
Appreciate your writing yourself
  • Well done!
  • I knew you could do it!
  • Im proud of you!
  • Good job!
  • Beautiful work!
  • Fantastic job!
  • Hip, hip hurray!
  • Creative job!
  • What an imagination!
  • You tried hard!

14
Game Are you tolerant?
15
(No Transcript)
16
Choose your answers and count only the circles
  • You have 8 circles Well done! You are very
    tolerant! You have character, you are a good
    sport and you can keep yourself and others from
    being aggressive. Tell your friends how you do
    it!
  • Between 7 and 3 circles You arent very
    tolerant! You can be touchy but youre brave and
    you can improve. Start practicing now!
  • 2 circles or less Oh dear! You arent tolerant!
    If you respected yourself and others a bit more,
    youd be much happier. Give it a try!

17
Declaration of Tolerance
  • www.tolerance.org

18
  • Tolerance is a personal decision that comes from
    a belief that every person is a treasure. I
    believe that Americas diversity is its strength.
    I also recognize that ignorance, insensitivity
    and bigotry can turn that diversity into a source
    of prejudice and discrimination.
  • To help keep diversity a wellspring of strength
    and make America a better place for all, I pledge
    to have respect for people whose abilities,
    beliefs, culture, race, sexual identity or other
    characteristics are different from my own.

19
  • To fulfill this pledge, I _______________ will
  • examine my own biases and work to overcome
    them,
  • set a positive example for my family and
    friends,
  • work for tolerance in my own community, and
  • speak out against hate and injustice.
  • We Share A World
  • For all our differences, we share one world.
  • To be tolerant is to welcome the differences and
    delight in the sharing.

20
A Learning Chart
What I know already about What Id like to know about What I learned about
?
21
Emotion Scale
LONELY GRATEFUL HAPPY
LONELY HAPPY
SAD ANGRY
SAD PROUD ANGRY
22
101 tools for tolerance
www.tolerance.org
23
Ideas for Yourself
  • 1. Attend a play, listen to music or go to a
    dance performance by artists whose race or
    ethnicity is different from your own.
  • 2. Volunteer at a local social services
    organization.
  • 3. Attend services at a variety of churches,
    synagogues and temples to learn about different
    faiths.
  • 4. Visit a local senior citizens center and
    collect oral histories. Donate large-print
    reading materials and books on tape. Offer to
    help with a craft project.
  • 5. Shop at ethnic grocery stores and specialty
    markets. Get to know the owners. Ask about their
    family histories.
  • 6. Participate in a diversity program.
  • 7. Ask a person of another cultural heritage to
    teach you how to perform a traditional dance or
    cook a traditional meal.
  • 8. Learn sign language.
  • 9. Take a conversation course in another language
    that is spoken in your community.

24
  • 10. Teach an adult to read.
  • 11. Speak up when you hear slurs. Let people know
    that biased speech is always unacceptable.
  • Imagine what your life might be like if you were
    a person of another race, gender or sexual
    orientation. How might "today" have been
    different?
  • Research your family history. Share information
    about your heritage in talks with others.
  • 14. List all the stereotypes you can positive
    and negative about a particular group. Are
    these stereotypes reflected in your actions?
  • 15. Think about how you appear to others. List
    personality traits that are compatible with
    tolerance (e.g., compassion, curiosity,
    openness). List those that seem incompatible with
    tolerance (e.g., jealousy, bossiness,
    perfectionism).

25
  • 16. Create a "diversity profile" of your friends,
    co-workers and acquaintances. Set the goal of
    expanding it by next year.
  • 17. Sign the Declaration of Tolerance and return
    it to The National Campaign for Tolerance, 400
    Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104.
  • 19. Read a book or watch a movie about another
    culture.

26
Ideas for Your Home
  • 20. Invite someone of a different background to
    join your family for a meal or holiday.
  • 21. Give a multicultural doll, toy or game as a
    gift.
  • 22. Assess the cultural diversity reflected in
    your homes artwork, music and literature. Add
    something new.
  • 23. Dont buy playthings that promote or glorify
    violence.
  • 24. Establish a high "comfort level" for open
    dialogue about social issues. Let children know
    that no subject is taboo.
  • 25. Bookmark equity and diversity Web sites on
    your home computer.
  • 26. Point out stereotypes and cultural
    misinformation depicted in movies, TV shows,
    computer games and other media.
  • Read books with multicultural and tolerance
    themes.

27
Ideas for Your School
  • 28. Volunteer to be an advisor for a student
    club. Support a wide range of extracurricular
    activities to help students "find their place" at
    school.
  • 29. Start a pen pal program. Get students in
    touch with people in different parts of the
    community, country or world.

28
Ideas for Your Community
  • 30. Start a monthly "diversity roundtable" to
    discuss critical issues facing your community.
    Establish an equity forum.
  • 31. Make copies of the Declaration of Tolerance
    (see page 16), encourage others to sign the
    pledge, and return it to The National Campaign
    for Tolerance, 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery,
    AL 36104.
  • 32. Create a town Web site.
  • 33. Write a letter to the editor if your local
    newspaper ignores any segment of the community or
    stories about cooperation and tolerance.
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