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Learning to be Lean

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Learning to be Lean Understanding Value, ... Office simulation Reducing non-value The Seven Wastes + 1 Defects What are key customer requirements? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Learning to be Lean


1
Learning to be Lean
2
Understanding Value, Waste and Flow
  • Are you living on Golden Pond or the Big Muddy?

3
Value Are we adding value?
4
Value Added vs. Non-value Added
  • An action that a customer is willing to pay for
  • An activity that transforms a product or service
  • An activity done correctly the first time.
  • An activity that consumes resources without
    creating value for the customer
  • An activity that is unpredictable in creating
    value
  • An activity that requires more time, effort or
    resources than necessary.

5
How much of what organizations do is considered
non-value added?
6
Office simulation
7
Reducing non-value
  • The Seven Wastes

8
The Seven Wastes 1
  • Defects (poor quality)
  • Transportation
  • Waiting
  • Overproduction
  • Inventory
  • Motion
  • Extra processing
  • Underutilized creativity

9
Defects
  • Any element of a product or service that does
    not meet or exceed a key customer requirement.

10
What are key customer requirements?
  • Hot food hot, cold food cold
  • Value (its worth what I pay for it)
  • I can get it when I want it, not when they are
    willing to give it to me
  • Its easy and convenient to get
  • If there is a problem, someone is willing to help
    me, without making me feel like an idiot.

11
Defects are not always so obvious
12
Fixing defects usually means
  • Re-work
  • Re-inspection
  • Re-design
  • More cost
  • Unhappy customers

13
Transportation
  • The unnecessary movement of people, information
    or materials between processes.

14
Follow the bouncing paperwork
15
Waiting
  • People, parts, systems or facilities idly
    waiting for a work cycle upstream to be completed.

16
Factoid
  • Waiting accounts for 95 of the time that is
    required to produce a product or service.

17
Overproduction
  • Producing products or services faster than your
    customers are using them requires
  • More movement
  • More storage
  • More capital tied up in inventory
  • More resources to track inventory

18
Office examples of overproduction
  • Need 54 copies, but make 60, just in case.
  • Print 5000 brochures because the price per unit
    is cheaper, then inventory, store and finally
    recycle 2/3 of them.
  • Print and distribute forms that frequently change.

19
Inventory
  • Storing more materials than you need in the
    near-term, or creating and storing more products
    than are being demanded by the customer in the
    near-term.

20
Motion
  • Any movement of peoples bodies that does not
    add value to product or service.

21
-
Frequency of Use Analysis Physical Files
  • 1

22
Extra processing
  • Multiple reviews/signatures
  • Different ways to produce the same product (no
    standardized work)
  • Batching work

23
Underutilized creativity
  • People who work in the process and know the
    process best (both the strengths and weaknesses).
  • Do they have the tools, training and permission
    to systematically improve their process?

24
Flow
  • Searching for Lean nirvana
  • Orienting your workplace and adjusting your
    work tasks so that the product or service is
    always in a state of constant value adding.

25
Obstacles to continuous flow
  • Bottlenecks Which step in the process
    constrains the throughput?
  • Multiple inspections How many steps involve
    inspecting actions in previous steps?
  • Production capacity that does not match TAKT time

26
Where is the bottleneck?
27

Takt time and cycle time
  • Takt time The average rate at which the
    customer consumes or requires the product or
    service (i.e. /day or /hour).
  • Cycle time The average amount of time it takes
    to produce the product or service.

28
Repeat Office simulation
  • How did we do?
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