Optimising metadata workflows in a distributed information environment - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Optimising metadata workflows in a distributed information environment


1
Optimising metadata workflows ina distributed
information environment
  • R. John Robertson Jane BartonCentre for
    Digital Library ResearchUniversity of
    Strathclyde, UK

2
Overview
  • Introductions definitions
  • Metadata, workflow optimisation
  • Diversity the distributed information
    environment
  • Models and frameworks
  • Generic models repositories, objects metadata
  • Existing models frameworks
  • Developing a metadata lifecycle model
  • Using the metadata lifecycle model tooptimise
    workflow
  • Moving forward

3
Metadata, workflow optimisation
  • Metadata good quality metadata metadata that
    meets repository requirements
  • Metadata workflow quality assured metadata by
    design metadata creation QA processes
    designed to meet repository requirements with
    available resources
  • Metadata workflow optimisation refining
    metadata workflow to improve quality enhance
    metadata
  • Critical to functionality, interoperability
    sustainability of repositories

4
Optimising metadata workflow
Barton, J. Robertson, R.J. Designing workflows
for quality assured metadata. CETIS Metadata
Digital Repositories SIG Meeting, Edinburgh, 10th
March 2005.
5
Diversity the dIE
  • In the wider environment, there is considerable
    diversity
  • of purpose
  • of metadata requirements
  • of metadata creation processes priorities
  • Diversity presents challenges for
    interoperability between repositories
  • Diversity also offers potential for refinement of
    metadata workflow among repositories
  • Assumes/requires persistent object identifiers

6
Optimising metadata workflow in the dIE
  • Workflow optimisation requires a model of the dIE
  • to facilitate strategic partnerships
  • to inform allocation of resources
  • to foster holistic approach to creation,
    augmentation enhancement of metadata
  • To achieve this, two conditions must be met
  • local workflow must be articulated
  • local workflow must be placed in context of
    wider environment

7
Reference models for workflow optimisation
  • Ecology of repositories
  • provides a typology of repositories associated
    services
  • models the relationships between them between
    their domains
  • Object lifecycle model
  • profiles objects within repositories their
    movement, transformation adaptation within the
    dIE
  • Metadata lifecycle model
  • profiles metadata within repositories its
    movement, augmentation enhancement within the
    dIE

8
Existing models frameworks
  • Existing models that relate to (parts of) the
    reference models
  • the E-Learning Framework
  • McLean Blincos cosmic view
  • the JISC Information Environment
  • CORDRA
  • the work of Gonçalves et al

9
The E-Learning Framework (ELF)
  • A common approach to service oriented
    architectures for education via
  • a definitional model of service components
  • standards tools to support their
    interoperability
  • Addresses a specific domain provides a typology
    of functions within that domain
  • (The E-Learning Framework. http//www.elframework.
    org)

10
McLean Blincos cosmic view
  • A service domain typology of repositories
  • more comprehensive than ELF but less detailed
  • highlights potential for cross-domain approach
  • identifies need for better articulation of
    context methodologies to deal with complex
    contextual issues
  • (McLean, N. The ecology of repository services a
    cosmic view. ECDL, 2004. http//www.ecdl2004.org/p
    resentations/mclean/)

11
The JISC Information Environment
  • Provides convenient access to a comprehensive
    collection of scholarly educational materials
  • can be viewed as a specific implementation of ELF
  • provides a superstructure to inform co-ordinate
    technical infrastructure development
  • focuses on technical solutions to support
    structural syntactical interoperability
  • taking a lead in addressing unresolved issues in
    the object lifecycle
  • (JISC. Strategic activities Information
    Environment.2004. http//www.jisc.ac.uk/about_inf
    o_env.html)

12
CORDRA
  • Enables access to wide range of learning object
    repositories through federated searching
  • high common denominator for participating LORs
  • creates community of repositories behind
    interoperability boundary
  • assumes federation as method of interaction, with
    metadata integration rather than
    interoperability, so little potential for
    metadata workflow optimisation
  • (Kraan,W. Mason,J. Issues in federating
    repositories a report on the first
    International CORDRA Workshop. D-Lib Magazine,
    11(3), 2005.)

13
Gonçalves et als 5S
  • Complex formal taxonomy of repositories
  • comprehensively catalogues repositories from five
    perspectives
  • engages with all three reference models but does
    not engage with interactions offers only a
    static view
  • (Goncalves,M.A. et al. Streams, structures,
    spaces, Scenarios, societies (5S) a formal model
    for digital libraries. ACM Transactions on
    Information Systems, 22(2), 2004.)

14
Existing models frameworks
  • In general, existing models
  • address structural syntactic interactions to a
    degree but do not address semantic interactions
  • provide voices, vocabularies grammar for
    repositories
  • could usefully be extended to profile not only
    what repositories do but how they might interact
    with each other

15
Developing a metadata lifecycle model
  • A metadata lifecycle model (MLM) must
  • include profiles of each repositorys metadata,
    ideally at element level, more realistically in
    terms of structure, semantics syntax
  • distinguish between local requirements those of
    the wider community
  • enable clusters of similar repositories to be
    identified relationships established
  • include processes carried out as a result of
    these relationships, formal or informal

16
Components of the model
17
Using the MLM to optimise workflow
  • MLM enables repositories to optimise workflow by
  • exploiting known metadata sources elsewhere in
    the dIE via intelligent import or harvesting
  • exploiting formal metadata relationships between
    repositories services via negotiation
    establishment of minimum standards
  • provides a framework for assessing the
    cost/benefit of eg implementing particular
    metadata elements or participating in consortia

18
Using the MLM example
  • The NSDL is a centralised service harvesting
    metadata from multiple sources
  • breaks harvested metadata into elements assigns
    provenance metadata to them
  • creates optimum records by combining metadata
    elements from various sources
  • creates metadata profiles of sources to enable
    these processes to be automated
  • demonstrates that metadata workflow optimisation
    intelligent harvesting can yield real benefits

19
Using the MLM use cases
  • LOR using LOM wants to harvest metadata records,
    has crosswalks mappings for structure syntax,
    seeks repositories with similar semantic approach
  • federated search service wants to dynamically
    select search targets that can support MESH
  • departmental repository enhances its metadata
    byre-harvesting general subject terms from its
    IR specialist subject terms from a subject
    repository
  • centralised service augments metadata
    automatically original source re-harvests
    improved record

20
Moving forward
  • In context of rapid repository development with
    limited resources, must use available resources
    as effectively as possible
  • Optimising metadata workflow across the dIE can
    enable repositories to
  • expand element sets without compromising on
    quality
  • expand functionality
  • improve ingest processes
  • support more automatic metadata transformation
    enhancement

21
Moving forward
  • Development of the MLM to support metadata
    workflow optimisation requires
  • standard way of profiling repositories at
    repository, object metadata level
  • integration with registry projects for
    repositories, standards, application profiles
    vocabularies
  • at individual repository level, a method for the
    design of metadata workflows that makes reference
    to exploits workflows elsewhere in the dIE

22
Optimising metadata workflow
Barton, J. Robertson, R.J. Designing workflows
for quality assured metadata. CETIS Metadata
Digital Repositories SIG Meeting, Edinburgh, 10th
March 2005.
View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Optimising metadata workflows in a distributed information environment

Description:

R. John Robertson & Jane Barton. Centre for Digital Library Research ... Barton, J. & Robertson, R.J. Designing workflows for quality assured metadata. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:11
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 23
Provided by: janeb97
Learn more at: http://www.ukoln.ac.uk
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Optimising metadata workflows in a distributed information environment


1
Optimising metadata workflows ina distributed
information environment
  • R. John Robertson Jane BartonCentre for
    Digital Library ResearchUniversity of
    Strathclyde, UK

2
Overview
  • Introductions definitions
  • Metadata, workflow optimisation
  • Diversity the distributed information
    environment
  • Models and frameworks
  • Generic models repositories, objects metadata
  • Existing models frameworks
  • Developing a metadata lifecycle model
  • Using the metadata lifecycle model tooptimise
    workflow
  • Moving forward

3
Metadata, workflow optimisation
  • Metadata good quality metadata metadata that
    meets repository requirements
  • Metadata workflow quality assured metadata by
    design metadata creation QA processes
    designed to meet repository requirements with
    available resources
  • Metadata workflow optimisation refining
    metadata workflow to improve quality enhance
    metadata
  • Critical to functionality, interoperability
    sustainability of repositories

4
Optimising metadata workflow
Barton, J. Robertson, R.J. Designing workflows
for quality assured metadata. CETIS Metadata
Digital Repositories SIG Meeting, Edinburgh, 10th
March 2005.
5
Diversity the dIE
  • In the wider environment, there is considerable
    diversity
  • of purpose
  • of metadata requirements
  • of metadata creation processes priorities
  • Diversity presents challenges for
    interoperability between repositories
  • Diversity also offers potential for refinement of
    metadata workflow among repositories
  • Assumes/requires persistent object identifiers

6
Optimising metadata workflow in the dIE
  • Workflow optimisation requires a model of the dIE
  • to facilitate strategic partnerships
  • to inform allocation of resources
  • to foster holistic approach to creation,
    augmentation enhancement of metadata
  • To achieve this, two conditions must be met
  • local workflow must be articulated
  • local workflow must be placed in context of
    wider environment

7
Reference models for workflow optimisation
  • Ecology of repositories
  • provides a typology of repositories associated
    services
  • models the relationships between them between
    their domains
  • Object lifecycle model
  • profiles objects within repositories their
    movement, transformation adaptation within the
    dIE
  • Metadata lifecycle model
  • profiles metadata within repositories its
    movement, augmentation enhancement within the
    dIE

8
Existing models frameworks
  • Existing models that relate to (parts of) the
    reference models
  • the E-Learning Framework
  • McLean Blincos cosmic view
  • the JISC Information Environment
  • CORDRA
  • the work of Gonçalves et al

9
The E-Learning Framework (ELF)
  • A common approach to service oriented
    architectures for education via
  • a definitional model of service components
  • standards tools to support their
    interoperability
  • Addresses a specific domain provides a typology
    of functions within that domain
  • (The E-Learning Framework. http//www.elframework.
    org)

10
McLean Blincos cosmic view
  • A service domain typology of repositories
  • more comprehensive than ELF but less detailed
  • highlights potential for cross-domain approach
  • identifies need for better articulation of
    context methodologies to deal with complex
    contextual issues
  • (McLean, N. The ecology of repository services a
    cosmic view. ECDL, 2004. http//www.ecdl2004.org/p
    resentations/mclean/)

11
The JISC Information Environment
  • Provides convenient access to a comprehensive
    collection of scholarly educational materials
  • can be viewed as a specific implementation of ELF
  • provides a superstructure to inform co-ordinate
    technical infrastructure development
  • focuses on technical solutions to support
    structural syntactical interoperability
  • taking a lead in addressing unresolved issues in
    the object lifecycle
  • (JISC. Strategic activities Information
    Environment.2004. http//www.jisc.ac.uk/about_inf
    o_env.html)

12
CORDRA
  • Enables access to wide range of learning object
    repositories through federated searching
  • high common denominator for participating LORs
  • creates community of repositories behind
    interoperability boundary
  • assumes federation as method of interaction, with
    metadata integration rather than
    interoperability, so little potential for
    metadata workflow optimisation
  • (Kraan,W. Mason,J. Issues in federating
    repositories a report on the first
    International CORDRA Workshop. D-Lib Magazine,
    11(3), 2005.)

13
Gonçalves et als 5S
  • Complex formal taxonomy of repositories
  • comprehensively catalogues repositories from five
    perspectives
  • engages with all three reference models but does
    not engage with interactions offers only a
    static view
  • (Goncalves,M.A. et al. Streams, structures,
    spaces, Scenarios, societies (5S) a formal model
    for digital libraries. ACM Transactions on
    Information Systems, 22(2), 2004.)

14
Existing models frameworks
  • In general, existing models
  • address structural syntactic interactions to a
    degree but do not address semantic interactions
  • provide voices, vocabularies grammar for
    repositories
  • could usefully be extended to profile not only
    what repositories do but how they might interact
    with each other

15
Developing a metadata lifecycle model
  • A metadata lifecycle model (MLM) must
  • include profiles of each repositorys metadata,
    ideally at element level, more realistically in
    terms of structure, semantics syntax
  • distinguish between local requirements those of
    the wider community
  • enable clusters of similar repositories to be
    identified relationships established
  • include processes carried out as a result of
    these relationships, formal or informal

16
Components of the model
17
Using the MLM to optimise workflow
  • MLM enables repositories to optimise workflow by
  • exploiting known metadata sources elsewhere in
    the dIE via intelligent import or harvesting
  • exploiting formal metadata relationships between
    repositories services via negotiation
    establishment of minimum standards
  • provides a framework for assessing the
    cost/benefit of eg implementing particular
    metadata elements or participating in consortia

18
Using the MLM example
  • The NSDL is a centralised service harvesting
    metadata from multiple sources
  • breaks harvested metadata into elements assigns
    provenance metadata to them
  • creates optimum records by combining metadata
    elements from various sources
  • creates metadata profiles of sources to enable
    these processes to be automated
  • demonstrates that metadata workflow optimisation
    intelligent harvesting can yield real benefits

19
Using the MLM use cases
  • LOR using LOM wants to harvest metadata records,
    has crosswalks mappings for structure syntax,
    seeks repositories with similar semantic approach
  • federated search service wants to dynamically
    select search targets that can support MESH
  • departmental repository enhances its metadata
    byre-harvesting general subject terms from its
    IR specialist subject terms from a subject
    repository
  • centralised service augments metadata
    automatically original source re-harvests
    improved record

20
Moving forward
  • In context of rapid repository development with
    limited resources, must use available resources
    as effectively as possible
  • Optimising metadata workflow across the dIE can
    enable repositories to
  • expand element sets without compromising on
    quality
  • expand functionality
  • improve ingest processes
  • support more automatic metadata transformation
    enhancement

21
Moving forward
  • Development of the MLM to support metadata
    workflow optimisation requires
  • standard way of profiling repositories at
    repository, object metadata level
  • integration with registry projects for
    repositories, standards, application profiles
    vocabularies
  • at individual repository level, a method for the
    design of metadata workflows that makes reference
    to exploits workflows elsewhere in the dIE

22
Optimising metadata workflow
Barton, J. Robertson, R.J. Designing workflows
for quality assured metadata. CETIS Metadata
Digital Repositories SIG Meeting, Edinburgh, 10th
March 2005.
About PowerShow.com