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Benton Harbor

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Title: Benton Harbor


1
Benton Harbor
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Walkability
3
What is the first thing an infant wants to do
and the last thing an older person wants to give
up? Walking is the exercise that does not
need a gym. It is the prescription without
medicine, the weight control without diet, and
the cosmetic that cant be found in a chemist. It
is the tranquilizer without a pill, the therapy
without a psychoanalyst, and the holiday that
does not cost a penny. Whats more, it does not
pollute, consumes few natural resources and is
highly efficient. Walking is convenient, it needs
no special equipment, is self-regulating and
inherently safe. .
A walkability plan must set a stage for all other
modes of transportation to work, including
transit. If people cannot walk then transit
remains ineffective.
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How can you know what to try with traffic until
….
  • Automobiles are often conveniently tagged as the
    villains responsible for the ills of cities and
    the disappointments and futilities of city
    planning. But the destructive effects of
    automobiles are much less a cause than a symptom
    of our incompetence at city building.
  • The simple needs of automobiles are more easily
    understood and satisfied than the complex needs
    of cities, and a growing number of planners and
    designers have come to believe that if they can
    only solve the problems of traffic, they will
    thereby have solved the major problems of cities.
  • Cities have much more intricate economic and
    social concerns than automobile traffic. How can
    you know what to try with traffic until you know
    how the city itself works, and what else it needs
    to do with its streets? You can't.
  • Jane Jacobs, Death and Life of Great American
    Cities , 1961

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Which neighborhood is more age friendly?
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Building from our Values
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Standard Of Living
Quality Of Life
Very High
Low
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Point 1 Its not just an obesity epidemic. Its
an epidemic of physical inactivity.
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Thirty percent of North Americans old enough to
drive do not drive. This percentage is
increasing.
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The Pedestrian in America has been marginalized
compromised to Death
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Why we cannot build our way out of traffic
Traffic Growth
Roads built
Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) around the U.S. have
increased by 70 percent over the last 20 years,
compared with a two percent increase in new
highway construction. The U.S. General
Accounting Office predicts that road congestion
in the U.S. will triple in 15 years even if
capacity is increased by 20 percent. Traffic is
growing about five times faster than the growth
in population. (Data compiled for a report to
the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2006
written by Stephen Polzin, (transportation
researcher at the University of South Florida in
Tampa.)
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If driving more than 20 mph is not sustainable,
how does Albert Lea get back down to 1985 levels?
Driving more miles each year (like obesity) is a
visible symptom, an indicator of a disease that
is running amuck in each of our towns and
villages.
26
Dear Dan, I have lived in Alpharetta, Georgia
for the past 12 years and I am literally choking
with all the traffic and development.  I would
like to move to a town where my kids can ride
their bikes or motorized scooters to school or to
the bakery or to the beach.  When I was younger
my family lived in Spring Lake, New Jersey and my
husband's family lived in Winnetka, Illinois
where you could do those kinds of fun things.  Do
you know of a book or resource that could help us
research towns such as those so we can begin the
planning stage of where to move to.  Thank you.
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Well Designed Density
Childhood needs
1. Explore natural areas, open, wild
2. See animals in their place
3. Learn size, scale, changes in habitat and
physical space
4. Have adventures, take risks
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The Popsicle Test Can you take a Popsicle to
your your brother or sister from the store to
your house before it melts?
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I shopped for a house, but I forgot to shop for a
community to live in …Cheryl from a suburban
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Neighborhood
Florida has the lowest rate of volunteerism in
the nation. What is that all about?
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Steve Price Urban Advantage
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Visuals by Marcel Steve Price, Urban Advantage
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Well Designed Density
Typical Florida first ring suburb
Urban-Advantage.com
Lack of Security
Auto dependence
Lack of people
No place to buy a popsicle
Lack of investment
Lack of diversity
Lack of diversity
Lack of activity
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Lakeshore Road (SR 5), Hamburg, NY
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Source Fisher Hall Urban Design
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Provide Commercial Retail In Redeveloping Areas

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Create New Sidewalks and Build Green Streets

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Improve Drainage and Rebuild Streets

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Canada
Marine Drive, Dundarave, B.C.
Highway 93, Missoula, Montana
USA
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West Lafayette, Indiana (Home of Purdue
University)
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New Port Village, Port Moody
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New Port Village, Port Moody
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New Port Village, Port Moody
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New Port Village, Port Moody
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Walkways
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Walkability Science
Sense of Aesthetics
Rubber band planning
Levels of Quality
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Walkability Support
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5
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Gateways
Features
  • Attractive
  • Well landscaped
  • Well lit
  • Both sides of street
  • Strong welcome
  • Active versus passive
  • Unique personality
  • Colorful and balanced
  • Friendly and inviting

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S.R. 30A, Watercolors, Florida
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S.R. 30A, Watercolors, Florida
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S.R. 30A, Watercolors, Florida
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Complete Streets
Placemaking
65
Monterey, California
Cleveland, Ohio.
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Monterey, California
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Hope 6 Project Seattle,
Washington Created by George Bush Senior,
Eliminated by George Bush Junior
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Complete Streets
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Low Speed
Low Noise
Low Volume
Palo Alto, California
72
Trees
Trees
On-Street Parking
Mini-Circle
Ground Cover
Inset Parking
Choker
73
The Built Environment and Traffic Safety
Eric Dumbaugh Texas AM University
Reid Ewing University of Maryland …….less-forgiv
ing design treatmentssuch as narrow lanes,
traffic-calming measures, and street trees close
to the roadwayappear to enhance a roadways
safety performance when compared to more
conventional roadway designs. The reason for this
apparent anomaly may be that less-forgiving
designs provide drivers with clear information on
safe and appropriate operating speeds.
74
Smart Streets are designed and managed with
speeds and intersections appropriate to context.
To advance walkability and compact development
patterns, smart growth street designs manage
speed and intersection operations to advance
overall community objectives.
75
Two trees at the street (with a sidewalk) cost
about 2-6,000 But, they raise property values
15-40,000, reduce private property energy costs
15-30, prolong the life of asphalt by 70,
reduce crashes, and eliminate up to 30 of
drainage costs.
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Reframing Key Transportation Conventions DESIGN
TRAFFIC - Interpreting the Results
Capacity of Streets
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Having less of this…
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Presentation Based on HIGHWAY CAPACITY MANUAL,
Special Report 2009, Transportation Research
Board, 1985
Level of Service
Qualitative measure of the effect of such factors
as travel speed, travel time, traffic
interruptions, freedom to maneuver, safety,
driving comfort, and convenience
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Twenty years ago Kirkland, Washington declared it
would not overly accommodate peak hour SOV
travel. Instead they chose to grow place, and
to focus on the health of its community and
people.
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Road Diets
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Every blizzard proves motorists prefer two lane
roads Indeed they place medians and edge
buffers on 4-lane roads when they get to design
them (before snow plows arrive). So why not
convert to 2-3 lanes, when conditions allow?
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Lake Washington Boulevard Kirkland, Washington
ADT 21,000 (Peaked at 29,000)
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Olympia, Washington (School Crossing) Former
4-lane
90
California Street, Mountain View, California
91
Speed reductions of 3-7 mph are common
Hartford, Connecticut
92
3 crash types can be reduced by going from 4 to 3
lanes 1 rear enders
X
Designing for Safety Road Diets
93
3 crash types can be reduced by going from 4 to 3
lanes 2 side swipes
X
Designing for Safety Road Diets
94
3 crash types can be reduced by going from 4 to 3
lanes 3 left turn/broadside
X
Designing for Safety Road Diets
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Bird Rock
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La Jolla Boulevard, Bird Rock, San Diego,
California (Five to two lane conversion,
before). Four signals and one four-way stop
being removed. Back-in Angled parking to be
added. (23,000 ADT)
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14 Feet
La Jolla Boulevard, Bird Rock, San Diego,
California
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