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Title: Spokane Washington


1
Spokane Washington
2
Washington State
3
(No Transcript)
4
Gonzaga University
5
Gonzaga Bulldogs
6
Doctoral Program in Leadership Studies
7
Gonzaga Pretoria Partnership
8
Global Leadership for Human Development
  • An Ethic of Care

9
Bretton Woods
  • The Main Thrust of Globalization
  • Reconstruct Land and Buildings
  • Develop Economies
  • Strengthen Human Capacity

10
Ideals of Globalization
  • Nations able to negotiate for expansion of trade
    within their own cultural and political
    frameworks
  • All economic players can offer, produce, and
    acquire what they want or need

11
Globalization Reality
  • Free play of the market was hindered by the
    diversity of the worlds social and legal orders

12
Enter the World Trade Organization
13
WTO Aims
  • Bring all countries or states under the same set
    of rules for economic trade
  • Pave the way to eliminate economic borders

14
Today we have a huge marketplace with global
sourcing and global marketing
15
Information Technology
  • moves this interlacing, interdependence,
    transcendence at a faster pace

16
Stoked by technology, globalization today is
moving at unprecedented speed, making sweeping
changes in our world that are altering our world
in ways that will determine our childrens
future (Rifkin)
17
Potentialities of Globalization
  • Reduce poverty
  • Nurture democracy and freedom
  • Break down isolation
  • Expand horizons
  • Spur growth
  • Yield higher economic standards
  • Specialization in production

18
Ideals of WTO Meet Resistance
19
Concerns About Globalization
  • Economic
  • Environmental
  • Cultural

20
Economic Concern
  • Places where people live are mere locators of
    economic activity

21
Economic Concern
  • Consumerism and the shifting of human motivation
    from freedom to consumption

22
Economic Concern
  • Poverty is not reduced rather the rich are
    getting richer and the poor are getting poorer

23
Economic Concern
  • Marginalization of nations, states
  • A loss of self-determination
  • Get on board or be left behind thinking

24
Environmental Concerns
25
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26
Ozone
World Climate
Biodiversity
27
Cultural Concerns
  • Speed of globalization monumental, swift
    changes in culture

28
Cultural Concern
29
Cultural Concern Homogenized World
  • The world is made poorer by the disappearance of
    cultural diversity certainly all humanity may be
    in some degree losers if a particular culture
    disappears.

30
Cultural Concern Homogenized World
  • The wrong done by destroying, suppressing, or
    devaluing culture is a wrong perpetrated against
    those whose culture it is. . . . It is a wrong
    suffered equally by all of humanity (Jones)

31
  • Roots
  • Anchors
  • Identifies
  • Locates

32
Africas Response to Globalization
  • NEPAD
  • New Partnership for African Development

33
Partnershipa unification of thought and actions
to
  • Eradicate Poverty
  • Attain Sustainable Growth
  • Halt the Marginalization of Africa
  • Develop Human Capacity

34
Two Critical Dimensions of NEPADs Vision
35
  • The Collective We is the greatest, richest
    resource of any nation or state
  • The Collective WE has the capacity to renew
    itself

36
Leadership Plays a Pivotal Role
37
Systems provide leadership with methodologies
which
  • Yield outcomes of development
  • Are able to mark sustainability
  • Can withstand scientific inquiry

38
Without systems, self-determination is not able
to happen for there would be no vision or
imagining of future possibilities and
potentialities
39
Examples of Systems for Economic Growth from NEPAD
  • Vision, Mission
  • Infrastructures
  • Policies
  • Judicial Systems

40
Greater challenges for leaders rest with
developing the Collective WE than in establishing
systems for economic growth.
41
Human Development
  • Personal growth of individuals and a Collective
    We
  • Moving toward a more mature way of viewing
    ourselves and the world around us

42
Peaks and Valleys of Human Development
Each peak represents new level of
consciousness Each valley represents preparation
for getting to the new peak
43
Basic Needs for Human Development
  • Belonging in community
  • Finding meaning
  • Feeling one is making a difference
  • Having a voice (empowerment)

44
Leadership Challenge
  • Influence and motivate the Collective We to view
    themselves and the world around them in new ways
  • Leading them through the valley of human
    development

45
A Valley Metaphor for Leadership
  • Deep change
  • In between spacesdifficult to see
  • Leader looks beyond toward new horizons
  • Having faith in the other side
  • The leader is in the valley too

46
Movements in the valley of human development
require relationships that are centered in an
ethic of care
47
The ethic of care provides the energy and power
to move the leader and the Collective We toward a
greater future
48
Leadership
Ethic of Caring
System for Economic Growth
The Collective We
49
Ethics means making conscious decisions that are
good, and taking actions accordingly
  • How might we live our lives?
  • Choice is at the heart of ethics
  • We are not entirely free to choose given our
    culture, history, ability to imagine, etc.

50
The Art of Conscious Living
  • Be Attentive
  • Be Understanding
  • Be Reasonable
  • Be Responsible

Bernard Lonergan (Theologian, Philosopher)
51
The Ethic of Care involves intentional
relationships between the leader and the
Collective We
  • The leader engages in the art of conscious living

52
The leader makes reasonable ad responsible
decisions about systems for economic
growthadapting them to meet the needs of the
Collective We and to assure they support the
development of their human capacity
53
Caring is a basic human tendency that expresses
our desire to help ourselves and others with the
intention of promoting life
54
Caring invites us to become more fully human by
authentically opening our hearts to others and in
the process discovering our common humanity
(Fuller, 1992, Maeroff, 1971)
55
Traditionally, Africa is concerned about the
wholeness of relationships, and this wholeness is
something Africa can bring to the world, a world
polarized, a world that is fragmented, a world
that destroys people (Bishop Tutu, 1997, p. 62)
56
Dynamics of Caring
Knowing
Responding
Transcending
Reconciling
57
KNOWING
  • Knowing Self as Leader
  • Knowing the Collective We

58
Knowing and Ubuntu
  • The essence of being human
  • Knowing ones connections to others. A person is
    a person through others
  • Speaks of wholeness and compassion.
  • Speaks of being welcoming, hospitable, warm, and
    generous, willing to share
  • (Tutu)

59
Knowing involves leaders realizing the essence of
their own humannessKnowing their true Self
Knowing their wholeness
60
Our wholeness includes goodness that makes us
bright and beautiful, and lovingAnd darkness
that is questionable, destructive, and dangerous
(Kelsey, p. 47)
61
Leaders need to know their goodness Leaders
need to know what tempts them into destructive
and dangerous behaviors
62
Self-cultivation can lead toward a more mature
world view
  • A world view that sees and pays attention to the
    patterned whole of existence, including physical,
    emotional, mental, and spiritual realness among
    all peoples comprising the Collective We

63
Knowing the Collective WEA challenging dynamic
given the multiple cultures and various
traditions, myths, history, present experiences,
and future potentialities
64
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65
Culture is a web of significance humans spin
in which they are suspended. (Greetz, p.
5) Culture is largely invisible, unconscious,
and usually goes unexamined (Spector)
66
The leader comes to know the various webs in
which humans spincoming to know cultures, their
meanings and practices, and what guides
peoples thoughts and actions
67
Knowing realities and truths of the Collective WE
through story tellingan oral tradition of many
cultures
68
A disregard for oral traditions is a cultural
bomb that makes people see their past as a
wasteland of non achievement, leading them to
distance themselves from their culture (Air
enhenbuua)
69
Through story telling, the leader becomes defined
by the Collective We and the Collective We
becomes influenced by the leader
70
Responding
  • Relationships with others provide one the
    opportunity to become more fully humanif one
    enters the relationship with ones whole being
    and assumes an attitude of response to the other.
  • (Martin Buber)

71
The response takes place in a between realm a
realm which draws a circle around the
happening (Buber)
72
The between realm holds the potentialities and
possibilities of individuals engaged in this
realm
73
DialogueA way to talk and think together
creating shared meaningestablishing a living,
mutual relation (Martin Buber)
74
The language of dialogue listens to
different views, turning toward the other, and
not injecting ones own rightness into the other
75
Leadership with No NameThe leader structures
spaces for others to speakThe leader waits to
serve the will of the people (Belenky, et
al. 1997).
76
ReconcilingAn atmosphere of
emotional harm can emerge, resulting in a climate
of confusion, cynicism, clouded vision, and fear
77
Reconciling means remembering ones own imperfect
identity
78
Forgiveness gives us the capacity to make a
new start. That is the rationale of confession
and forgiveness. . . . Forgiveness is the grace
by which you enable the other person to get up
and get up with dignity to begin
anew. (Bishop Tutu, 1997, p. 61)
79
Transcendence captures our innate capacities as
human beings to renew our lives by constructing
new conceptual worlds, new realities (Beck
Cowan Kegan Wilber)
80
Relationships centered in an Ethic of Care invite
us to transcend our current world views in search
of new meanings
81
If there is no culture of caring support during
transformation, new thinking rarely germinate,
much less blooms (Beck Cowan)
82
Leadership
Ethic of Caring
System for Economic Growth
The Collective We
83
The Ethic of Caringan Ideal
  • Ideals are about goodness and call on the
    goodness that lies within each of us.
  • This goodness is concrete rather than abstract.
    It is concrete because it exists.
  • The ideal is relevant to the good in so far as
    the existing good is incomplete and in the
    process of completion
  • (Lonergan)

84
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