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Traditional and Digital Publishing in Australia

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... g. Herald-Sun, The Australian, The Daily Telegraph. John Fairfax Holdings, e.g. The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald. News ... The Sydney Morning Herald ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Traditional and Digital Publishing in Australia


1
Traditional and Digital Publishing in Australia
  • Lecture 9
  • Publishing Principles and PracticeACP 2079

2
Newspaper Publishing in Australia
  • Capital city newspapers are dominated by two
    corporations
  • Rupert Murdochs News Corporation, e.g.
    Herald-Sun, The Australian, The Daily Telegraph
  • John Fairfax Holdings, e.g. The Age, The Sydney
    Morning Herald.

3
News Corporation
  • Rupert Murdoch inherited The News (Adelaide)
    after his father Sir Frank Murdoch died in 1952.
  • From these beginnings he built the international
    media empire known as The News Corporation, which
    includes interests in
  • 20th Century Fox
  • Sky News
  • British Sky Broadcasting
  • Foxtel
  • Fox Sports
  • The Australian
  • Harper Collins Publishers.
  • The New York Post
  • The Times (London)
  • News of the World (UK)

4
John Fairfax Holdings
  • Two main newspapers are
  • The Age
  • The Sydney Morning Herald
  • Also the Sun-Herald (Sunday Sydney Morning
    Herald), The Newcastle Herald, The Standard
    (Warrnambool), The Border Mail (Albury),
    Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong)
  • Various New Zealand newspapers.

5
Magazine Publishing
  • Dominated by Publishing and Broadcasting Limited
    (James Packer)
  • For example The Womens Weekly, Womans Day, The
    Bulletin, Cosmopolitan
  • And digital publishing interests in ninemsn,
    allied to Channel 9.

6
Cross-Media Ownership Laws
  • The Australian Broadcasting Authority
  • Aims for diverse media ownership to provide fair
    and unbiased reporting
  • Broadcasting Services Act 1992

7
Television to 2006
  • A person must not control television broadcasting
    licences whose combined licence area exceeds 75
    per cent of the population of Australia, or more
    than one licence within a licence area.
  • Foreign persons must not be in a position to
    control a licence and the total of foreign
    interests must not exceed 20 per cent.
  • There are also limits on multiple directorships
    and foreign directors.
  • (Source Parliamentary Library, Australia)

8
Radio to 2006
  • A person must not be in a position to control
    more than two licences in the same licence area.
  • Multiple directorships are also limited.
  • (Source Parliamentary Library, Australia)

9
Cross-media Control to 2006
  • A person must NOT control
  • a commercial television broadcasting licence and
    a commercial radio broadcasting licence having
    the same licence area
  • a commercial television broadcasting licence and
    a newspaper associated with that licence area
  • or a commercial radio broadcasting licence and
    newspaper associated with that licence area.
  • (Source Parliamentary Library, Australia)

10
Cross-media Laws from 2007
  • The Federal Government announced new media
    cross-ownership laws in early 2007.
  • Certain restrictions on foreign ownership were
    removed.
  • See http//www.xmedia.org.au
  • More about these developments in next weeks
    lecture on Global Publishing Trends.

11
Overview of Book Publishing in Australia
  • Source Australian Bureau of Statistics, Survey
    of Book Publishers (Australia) 2003-04 (financial
    year), published 2005.
  • 244 book publishing businesses
  • 129 million books sold
  • Income 1561 million
  • Profit 152 million.

12
Book Publishing in Australia
  • Profits for largest 20 book publishers 9.5
  • 20 largest publishers account for 72 of the
    industry
  • Book publishing employs 5,300 people
  • 3,547 work for the 20 largest publishers

13
Method of Sales
  • 77 were to retailers and other book distributors
  • 23 direct sales to customers
  • 1 sales via internet

14
Sales by Category
15
Sales by Category and Origin
16
Fiction and Non-fiction Sales
17
A Brief History of the Internet (1)Key
References A History of the Internet by Ross
Sharon (HTML source)A Brief History of the
Internet by multiple authors (Internet Society)
  • Packet switching networks for computers were
    developed in the 1960s (circuits too slow)
  • First tested in Europe
  • Tests in US in 1968 led to development by ARPA
    (Advanced Research Projects Agency) of ARPANET
  • From 1969-1982 ARPANET used NCP (Network Control
    Protocol) then switched to TCP/IP (Transmission
    Control Protocol - Internet Protocol)

18
A Brief History of the Internet (2)
  • First major application of the Internet was a set
    of US military computers during the Cold War with
    Soviet Union (Russia and allied states, USSR).
  • A central mainframe computer was too vulnerable
  • The Internet enabled the network to survive even
    though individual computers might be destroyed in
    a Soviet nuclear strike.

19
A Brief History of the Internet (3)
  • The boom in personal computers from the early
    1980s led to Fidonet, Bitnet as well as Usenet
    which were then joined into the Internet
  • By 1988 Internet Relay Chat was available and
    communities began to congregate in chat rooms.
  • 1991 World Wide Web unveiled by Tim Berners-Lee
    and Robert Caillau (CERN in Geneva)

20
A Brief History of the Internet (4)
  • First proper WWW browser (Mosaic) introduced in
    1993 and public interest in the Internet
    exploded.
  • In 1994 many small Internet Service Providers
    (ISPs) began connecting Australian organisations
    and businesses to the Internet.
  • Larger ISPs began to arrive in about 1995.
  • A browser war developed between Microsoft and
    Netscape

21
The Internet Today
  • The use and development of the Internet continued
    throughout the 1990s and into the 21st century
  • Today the Internet has become an everyday
    worktool, system of communication, entertainment
    and commerce that is almost impossible to destroy
  • Key features are World Wide Web, E-mail, File
    Transfer Protocol (FTP), Internet Relay Chat
    (IRC), Usenet (a news service).

22
The Impact of the Internet and Digital Publishing
  • This semester we have already looked at the rise
    of Internet booksellers like Amazon.com
  • We have also looked at the concept of Print On
    Demand books (Jason Epstein).
  • E-books are on the rise
  • http//www.textlibrary.com/ebook_reader_devices_li
    brary.htm
  • http//www.microsoft.com/reader/us/shop/default.ms
    px

23
Are Blogs a Genuine Alternative Media?
  • New York author Thane Rosenbaum, while visiting
    the Melbourne Writers Festival in 2006, slammed
    the use of blogs
  • In effect he described them as millions of
    worthless opinions unmediated by editorial
    standards or public accountability
  • Is Thane Rosenbaum missing the point of blogs?

24
A Note about Traditional Skills in the Current
Environment
  • The writing and editorial skills you develop are
    becoming more (not less) important as digital
    publishing competition intensifies.
  • A knowledge of design principles as well as
    layout skills become increasingly valuable as
    many fields of publishing demand more
    multi-skilling of writers.

25
From Humble Beginnings
  • A small printing press had been brought out in
    the first fleet, but it had not been utilised
    until November, 1795
  • FromBorchardt, D.H. Kirsop, W. (eds). The
    Book in Australia Essays Towards a Social and
    Cultural History. Melbourne Monash
    University,1988. (page 3)
  • ltEndgt
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