Building SmokeFree Home Environments Josie dAvernas Program Training and Consultation Centre Ontario - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Building SmokeFree Home Environments Josie dAvernas Program Training and Consultation Centre Ontario

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... include window clings for the home and car, and an easy to read brochure with action steps ... Use the international nonsmoking symbol ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Building SmokeFree Home Environments Josie dAvernas Program Training and Consultation Centre Ontario


1
Building Smoke-Free Home Environments Josie
dAvernas Program Training and Consultation
Centre Ontario Tobacco Strategy jdavernas_at_golden.n
et
2
QUESTION 1 What is your personal tolerance level
for ETS?
a)
b)
c)
3
QUESTION 2 Second-hand smoke is
  • Less dangerous than direct smoking?
  • More dangerous than direct smoking?
  • About the same?

4
Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS)
Sidestream smoke from smouldering cigarette
Exhaled smoke from the smoker
5
QUESTION 3 Compared to adults, children are
  • Less harmed by second-hand smoke?
  • More harmed by second-hand smoke?
  • No difference?

6
The need to protect children from ETS
  • Childrens physiology makes them more vulnerable
    to the effects of ETS
  • respiration rate
  • immature immune systems

7
The need to protect children from ETS
  • In children, ETS is responsible for
  • 7 of all ear infections
  • 20 of all tonsillectomies
  • 14 of all tube insertions in ears
  • 13 of physician visits for coughs
  • Source diFranza Lew, Pediatrics, 1996

8
The need to protect children from ETS
  • Children
  • are more
  • dependent
  • on others
  • their
  • communicn
  • skills are
  • less well-
  • developed

I said Hamburger with fries
9
The need to protect children from ETS
  • Future smoking behaviour can be predicted by
    parental smoking.

10
QUESTION 4 Its best for a pregnant woman who
smokes to
  • Quit smoking for the sake of the baby?
  • Keep smoking because the stress of quitting is
    harder on the baby than the smoking?
  • Cut down, but not quit?

11
Maternal smoking in pregnancy can lead to
  • spontaneous abortion
  • low birthweight
  • higher risk of death in perinatal period
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome SIDS

12
Developing a smoke-free homes campaign
  • Key Considerations

13
  • Soft sell
  • or
  • Hard line?

14
Soft sell Hard line
  • message can be misinterpreted
  • little risk of reaction effects
  • credible to all
  • may encourage complacency
  • message is undeniable
  • higher risk of reaction effects
  • some may disregard message, thinking the claims
    are exaggerated

15
friends homes
  • What makes up the home environment?

family home
workplace
family vehicle
16
  • Education
  • or
  • Legislation?

17
  • Who should we target?

(Should we be intensive and targeted or
broad-based and low contact?)
18
Segmentation of Canadian Parent Population
19
How do we move beyond awareness to action?
  • …by addressing common myths and barriers

20
Some common myths barriers
  • Normal healthy kids are not affected by
    second-hand smoke
  • If I cant see or smell it, its gone
  • If I cant make my home completely smoke-free,
    theres no point in doing anything
  • Im not comfortable telling people not to smoke
    in the house. How else can I let them know?
  • Im not being a good host if guests have to go
    outside to smoke

21
Developing a smoke-free homes campaign
  • A Glimpse at Some
  • Successful Campaigns

22
1. Background
  • Almost all health units in Ontario have developed
    and implemented smoke-free homes campaigns in
    recent years
  • PTCC reviewed these campaigns to analyze the
    various elements employed, with a view to
    promoting the best of for widespread adoption

23
2. Typical campaign elements
  • Media-based awareness
  • Kits to homeowners/renters
  • Signs (window clings, fridge magnets)
  • Brochures
  • Memo pads and pens
  • Fact sheets
  • Family contracts pledging smoke-free spaces
  • Smoke-free restaurant guides
  • Childrens activity sheets
  • Contest (in some cases)

24
3. Sample promotional activities
  • Media releases
  • Ads on radio, transit, television, internet,
    billboards
  • Tear-off prescription pads promoting smoke-free
    homes via physicians offices
  • Kits distributed at prenatal classes
  • Kits distributed to homes via schools with nurses
    doing presentations
  • Invitation to call for a kit (at community
    locations, on www, in ads)
  • Contest

25
4. Example of a contest
  • Established sponsors and prizes letters to 140
    businesses yielded 15 interested sponsors and 25
    prizes (diamond pendant, colour TV, home security
    system, theatre tickets, gift certificates)
  • Media launch (press release and event)
  • Ads on radio, transit, television, internet,
    billboards ad invited them to call for a kit
    and registration form
  • Interactive display at malls and workplaces
    (staffed) 28 of entries received this way
  • Contestants pledged to make or keep home
    smoke-free for 2.5 month period no validation
    of self-report
  • Media celebration to close contest on World
    Health Day

26
Results of contest
  • 2,637 entries received
  • 81 of entrants already had smoke-free homes
    before the contest
  • Good media coverage
  • Total cost of campaign approximately 15,000 plus
    substantial volunteer contributions of time
    in-kind

27
5. Slogans and logos
  • Many different slogans and logos used
  • Our children the air they breathe
  • Thanks Mommy and Daddy for a Smoke-free Home
  • Clean Air for Kids
  • Helping our Kids Breathe Easy
  • Kids Need Breathing space, Take Your Butt Outside
  • If you Smoke, Take it Outside
  • Think about Second-hand Smoke Its not enough
    to open a window, its better to leave the room,
    its best to go outside
  • Open the Door to a Smoke-free Home
  • Welcome to our Smoke-free Home
  • Focus tested these to identify the best of for
    widespread dissemination across Ontario

28
6. Conclusions
  • SHS in homes is a significant risk to a
    significant portion of the population
  • A well-designed media component is considered
    essential
  • Program materials should do two things catch
    attention and provide information
  • Fewer items are considered more impactful than
    multi-component kits
  • Core recommended items include window clings for
    the home and car, and an easy to read brochure
    with action steps
  • Supportive items include information on where to
    go for help to quit, posters, and contests
  • Unnecessary elements include childrens activity
    sheets, guides to local smoke-free restaurants,
    contracts pledging to be smoke-free
  • Visuals are important, as is colour
  • Avoid attributions on stickers and clings
  • Use the international nonsmoking symbol
  • Use second-hand smoke rather than
    environmental tobacco smoke

29
6. Conclusions
  • Profiling the needs of children is effective
  • Look for ways to target those who dont already
    have smoke-free homes
  • Work with health care professionals so they will
    encourage parents to provide smoke-free home
    environments

30
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