Comparative Linguistic Analysis of Cross-gender and Same-Gender Interactions During Virtual Job Interviews using Virtual Reality Technology - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Comparative Linguistic Analysis of Cross-gender and Same-Gender Interactions During Virtual Job Interviews using Virtual Reality Technology

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Bogaers (1998): Focus on laughter, interruptions, initiation/response. Studied qualitative and quantitative aspects in total of 4 interviews. Gender Studies ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Comparative Linguistic Analysis of Cross-gender and Same-Gender Interactions During Virtual Job Interviews using Virtual Reality Technology


1
Comparative Linguistic Analysis ofCross-gender
and Same-Gender Interactions During Virtual Job
Interviews using Virtual Reality Technology
  • Courtney Wang
  • Mentor Dr. Shelley Brundage

2
Introduction
  • Disciplines of Sociolinguistics and
    Speech-Language Pathology
  • Gender Studies
  • Nature of fellowship study

3
Interview Studies
  • Previous Focus on
  • Conversational Analysis
  • Paralinguistic/ linguistic Behavior
  • Turn-taking procedure
  • Study focuses on
  • Combination of quantitative and qualitative
    factors, based on
  • Disfluency
  • Gender

4
Disfluency
  • Quality of Disfluency
  • Quantity of Disfluency
  • Relationship to interviewer variables Dr.
    Brundages Stuttering Study

5
Interviews and Gender
  • Bogaers (1998) Focus on laughter, interruptions,
    initiation/response. Studied qualitative and
    quantitative aspects in total of 4 interviews

6
Gender Studies
  • Judith Butler Nature of Gender
  • Deborah Tannen Gender and linguistic interaction
  • Study focuses on relative comfort levels based on
    gender

7
Purpose of Study
  • Measure comparative comfort levels and disfluency
  • Describe the relationship between interviewer
    gender and relative comfort level based on
    participants self-perception
  • Determine which survey best reflects subjects
    comfort level in interview scenario

8
Method
  • Equipment and Materials
  • Data collection surveys and audio
  • Data Analysis

9
Virtual Reality
  • Apparatus Head Mounted Display (HMD)
  • Software (Virtually Better, Inc)
  • Interview Scenarios

10
Virtual Male Interviewer
11
Virtual Female Interviewer
12
Surveys
  • Personal Report of Communication Apprehension
    (PRCA-24)
  • Personal Report of Confidence as a Speaker (PRCS)
  • Gender Survey
  • Immersion Questionnaire

13
Audio Recording
  • Subjects responses are recorded directly to CD
    during interview
  • Transcription Process
  • Reliability Checks

14
Data Analysis
  • Quantitative analyses correlations between
    communication apprehension, confidence,
    disfluency, and gender
  • Qualitative analyses Comparison of Male/Female
    results

15
Discussion of Variables
  • Disfluency Percentage of Total Disfluencies per
    Interview Condition ( Disfluency)
  • Gender Survey
  • PRCA-24 and PRCS

16
Correlations
  • Significant correlations found between PRCA and
    PRCS (similar findings found for persons who
    stutter)
  • No significant correlations found between
    disfluency, communication apprehension, or
    communication confidence

17
Comfort Level Data Male
          1 Male 1 same  
    total   Subject 0 female 0 different Self-rated
Subject Gender rating Disfluencies samecross Gender Most intimidating Most comfortable Quality
VR-LI-01 3 5.08 Higher M 1 0 7
VR-LI-03 3 4.64 Higher M 1 0 8
VR-LI-08 3 6.73 Higher M 1 0 5
VR-LI-09 3 13.20 Lower M 0 1 5
VR-LI-10 3 5.07 Lower M 0 1 6
18
Comfort Level Data Female
          1 Male 1 same  
    total   Subject 0 female 0 different Self-rated
Subject Gender rating Disfluencies samecross Gender Most intimidating Most comfortable Quality
VR-LI-05 6 6.96 Higher F 0 0 8
VR-LI-06 6 2.38 Higher F 0 0 6
VR-LI-02 7 3.75 Lower F 1 1 2
VR-LI-04 7 3.69 Higher F 0 0 8
VR-LI-07 9 8.94 Higher F 0 0 3
19
Findings
  • There is a relationship between comfort
    level/intimidation and disfluency level between
    genders
  • Men had a higher mean of total disfluencies
    overall.

20
Overall Results
  • Preliminary findings show that men score
    themselves more narrowly on gender scale
  • Disfluency levels corresponded to perceived
    intimidation

21
Application of Research
  • Medical Interview
  • Job Interview
  • Gender Studies Male/Female interactional
    perceptions
  • Disfluency training and rehabilitation
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