Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Defence DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE Annual Report FY2004/2005 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Defence DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE Annual Report FY2004/2005 PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: c39e9-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Defence DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE Annual Report FY2004/2005

Description:

DOD Youth Foundation Training Programme (YFTP) for previously disadvantaged learners: ... to 10 ordered operations and eight (8) joint and multinational exercises. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:259
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 100
Provided by: pmg2
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Defence DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE Annual Report FY2004/2005


1
Presentation to the Portfolio Committee on
Defence DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE Annual Report
FY2004/2005
  • 8 November 2005

2
SCOPE
  • Aim
  • Introduction
  • Strategic Direction (Chapter 1)
  • Defence Objectives , Outcome and Outputs
  • (Chapter 2)
  • Organisational Structure and Human Resources
    (Chapter 3)
  • Programme Performance (Chapters 5-12)
  • Measurable objective
  • Achievements Challenges
  • ENE
  • Questions

3
AIM
  • To brief the Portfolio Committee
  • on Defence
  • on the DOD Annual Report FY2004/05

4
INTRODUCTION
  • DOD Annual Report directly linked to DOD
    Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05.
  • Followed guidelines also provided by Parliament
    (Portfolio Committee on Defence) regarding
    linkage with Plan.
  • Compliance with regulatory framework (PFMA,
    Public Service Act and related regulations).
  • Format remains largely the same, for ease of
    reference and comparitive trends analysis.
  • Main considerations (criteria) when compiling the
    DOD Annual Report for tabling in Parliament
  • Readability Easy to read, not much
    interpretation required, limited use of internal
    (military) jargon. Grammar checked by language
    specialists (D Lang) style and layout checked by
    CDCC.
  • Integrity of information correctness,
    completeness, verifiability and possible security
    concerns.

5
CHAPTER ONE STRATEGIC DIRECTION (CHAPTER 1 OF
SBP)
6
CHAPTER 1
  • Strategic Profile
  • Vision
  • Mandate
  • Mission
  • Aim of the DOD
  • Alignment with Cabinet Cluster priorities
  • Minister of Defences Priorities for FY2004/05.
  • Strategic focus
  • Functions of the SecDef CSANDF
  • Parys Resolutions

7
CHAPTER TWO DEFENCE OBJECTIVES , OUTCOME AND
OUTPUTS (CHAPTER 2 OF SBP)
8
CHAPTER 2
  • DOD Programmes (nine)
  • Military strategic objectives (as revised by the
    Minister of Defence, Aug 04)
  • Defence Outcome Effective defence for a
    democratic South Africa
  • Defence Outputs
  • All Services and Divisions have operational plans
    which indicate outputs, clients to benefit,
    linkage with Govt priorities and required
    resource requirements for those outputs.
  • Risks to be managed by sub-programmes and those
    that are transferred to higher authority.
    Strategies to mitigate risks are also included.
  • Inspector General DOD conducts regular
    performance audits to verify results achieved.

9
CHAPTER 2
  • Primary Outputs
  • Defence commitments
  • Landward defence capabilities
  • Air defence capabilities
  • Maritime defence capabilities
  • Military health capabilities
  • Secondary Outputs
  • Cryptographic security services to Govt Depts
  • National Codification Bureau
  • Defence diplomacy
  • Honouring the DODs international obligations
  • Participation in Govt clusters (IRPS, JCPS, and
    GA)
  • Defence policy advice
  • Report focuses mainly on primary outputs

10
CHAPTER 2
  • Services rendered Included in
  • Social Contribution, Cht-4, pg 4-8
  • Discontinued services
  • Phasing out of the Area Defence Capability
    (Commandos) to be completed by March 2009.
  • New/proposed services None
  • Losses and damages Included in Financial
    statements
  • Events after the Accounting Date None

11
CHAPTER THREE ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE
AND HUMAN RESOURCES (CHAPTER 3 OF SBP)
12
CHAPTER 3
13
CHAPTER 3
  • DOD HR Strategy 2010 Progress Report
  • Addresses high-level human resource management
    concept.
  • One of Minister of Defences priorities.
  • Military Skills Development System (MSDS) has
    grown to 6 262, comprising 10 of Regular Force.
  • Rank-Age ratio for Privates aged between 18 24
    improved by 27,4 since 2003.
  • SA Navy trained 74 MSDS members for use in the
    National Public Works Dept.
  • 146 MSDS members obtained certificates in
    Military Studies from the Military Academy.
  • Voluntary programme was instituted to re-deploy
    215 SANDF members to the SAPSs Security and
    Protection Division.
  • DOD Youth Foundation Training Programme (YFTP)
    for previously disadvantaged learners
  • 250 trained during 2004 academic year, 228 of
    them appointed in the DOD.
  • Pass-rate Maths (98) Physical Science (99)
    Biology (100).

14
CHAPTER 3
  • One-Force Concept
  • Reserve Force Strategy and Plan were approved by
    the Defence Staff Council.
  • 1 443 Reserve Force members recruited for
    preparation and deployment in peace missions.
  • Macro Workforce Composition
  • In the absence of an approved exit mechanism, DOD
    relied on natural attrition for the reduction of
    personnel in line with Defence Review (1998)
    target of 70 000.
  • Defence Act Personnel (DAP) increased by 2.4
    from 60 444 (1 Apr 04) to 61 947 (31 Mar 05).
  • Public Service Act Personnel (PSAP) decreased by
    2.9 from 15 469 (1 Apr 04) to 15 022 (31 Mar 05).

15
CHAPTER 3
  • Personnel Expenditure (Tables 3.1 3.4 )
  • Tables as Prescribed by Dept of Public Service
    and Administration (DPSA)
  • Actual employee cost as a percentage of total DOD
    HR Cost, incl Strategic Defence Packages (SDPs)
    was 39, which is within Defence Review
    guidelines of 40. Note Reserve Force
    expenditure not included due to their
    non-continuous utilisation in the DOD
  • Challenge force design and force structure is a
    prerequisite for defining the appropriate and
    affordable size of the DOD HR composition.
  • Employment and Vacancies (Tables 3.5 to 3.10)
  • Indicated vacancies were predominantly unfunded.
  • Post establishment decreased by 870 posts
    compared to previous year.
  • Increase in MSDS members.
  • Appointments. Due to budget constraints,
    appointments were limited to specialised and
    professional occupations.

16
CHAPTER 3
  • Terminations
  • No exit mechanism reliance on natural attrition
    (contract expiry, medical discharges,
    retirements, deaths and resignations).
  • Increase of 557 terminations compared to previous
    year. This was mainly due to voluntary
    redeployment of SANDF members to the SAPSs
    Security and Protection Division.
  • Promotions. Compared to FY03/04, there were 276
    fewer promotions in critical occupations (see
    Table 3.11 3.12).

17
CHAPTER 3
  • Employment Equity
  • As at April 2005 DOD total strength was 76 969.
  • The total strength in terms of gender
    representation of the DOD was 59 608 males (78)
    and 17 301 females (22).
  • 367 (0,5) employees of the DOD have been
    registered as having disability.
  • Full time component comprised of 63,9 Africans,
    12,64 Coloureds, 1,3 Indians and 22,96 Whites.
  • This is in line with Defence Review guideline of
    64,68 Africans, 10,22 Coloureds, 0,75 Indians
    and 24,35 Whites.

18
CHAPTER FIVE DEFENCE ADMINISTRATION (CHAPTER 4
OF SBP)
19
Conduct overall management, administration and
policy development of the Department
CHAPTER 5 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
20
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • POLITICAL DIRECTION
  • Involved in a number of defence-related
    diplomatic activities
  • Participation in African Union and SADC
    activities, including the Inter-State Defence and
    Security Committee (ISDSC).
  • Provision of strategic guidelines and priorities
    for FY2006/07.
  • DEPARTMENTAL DIRECTION
  • Dealt with Auditor-General and Parliamentary
    queries relating to defence policy.
  • Appeared before Parliament in respect of various
    issues.
  • Participated in the defence-related Government
    clusters, i.e. IRPS, JCPS and the GA.

21
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • SANDF COMMAND AND CONTROL
  • Continued to support the Minister of Defences
    peace initiatives through peace missions and
    Continued with military-to-military relations
    with various countries in line with IRPS
    priorities and DOD defence diplomatic policy.
  • Played a leadership role in the establishment of
    the African Standby Force and SADC Brigade.
  • POLICY AND PLANNING
  • Defence Policy
  • Involvement in the SADC regional and continental
    activities, e.g. development of the Common
    Defence and Security Policy
  • Provided support to external deployments of the
    SANDF, including Cabinet memoranda, conclusion of
    agreements, etc.

22
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Strategic Management
  • Support to strategic direction processes,
    including planning and co-ordination of
    Ministerial and DOD strategic planning work
    sessions.
  • Co-ordination of pilot-implementation of the
    Balanced Scorecard in the DOD.
  • HR Planning
  • Successful implementation of DOD HR Budgeting
    System (known as Legadima).
  • A new DOD Personnel Acquisition Strategy was
    developed.
  • The Rural and Scarce Skills Allowance was
    implemented for the Military Health Professions
    in order to retain expertise.
  • First Military Skills Development System (MSDS)
    intake cycle was successfully completed.

23
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Reserves and Veterans
  • An agreement was signed between Dept of Labour
    and DIDTETA to utilise Rm56 for providing skills
    to the military veterans.
  • Legal Support. Processing of legislation was
    processed.
  • Challenges
  • Finalisation of the Defence Update.
  • Funding of the Conventional Arms Control
    Inspectorate.
  • Updating the DODs Structure Management Control
    System (SMCS).
  • Servicing and reprioritisation of Memoranda of
    Understanding.

24
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
  • Budget Management Service. The following was
    provided
  • Budgeting guidelines, Budget motivation report,
    Estimate of expenditure, Defence vote. Special
    Defence Account schedule.
  • Corporate Budget Control Service. The following
    was provided
  • Adjustment budget, Monthly early warning reports,
    Virement and fund re-allocations, Roll-over
    claim, Reconciliation statements for cash
    donations, Expended vote.
  • Budget Management Service to Budget Authorities.
    The following outputs were provided
  • Budget preparation service, Budget execution
    service.

25
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Accounting Services
  • Corporate Financial Asset and Annual Reporting
    Service Management of departmental debt,
    Management of DOD bank account, Control over
    financial transactions as prescribed by law and
    related regulations, Preparation of financial
    statements, Provision of adequate cash in the DOD
    Paymaster-General Account for planned monthly
    cash flow.
  • Management of stores, services and related
    payment and revenue.
  • Remuneration administration service for
    personnel.
  • Public Finance Management Compliance Service
  • Financial risk management, Audit report
    management.
  • Financial delegations and policies, Financial
    misconduct.
  • Losses and claims administration.

26
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Financial Support Service in respect of
  • Financial information support, Contract
    management, Management of face-value documents,
    Career management, Grievance and discipline
    administration.
  • Challenges
  • Implementation of the Integrated Financial
    Management System (IFMS).
  • Unqualified statements unlikely unless DOD
    obtains exemptions until IFMS in place.

27
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • DEPARTMENTAL ACQUISITION AND PROCUMENT
  • Strategic Defence Packages (SDPs) were delivered
    as per contractual arrangements.
  • Acquisition Service
  • Army Acquisition Artillery Target Engagement
    System integrated and required systems (such as
    40mm Automatic Grenade Launcher) delivered.
  • Air Force Acquisition
  • Hawk Lead-in Fighter Trainer. Production ahead
    of schedule and good progress on infrastructure
    upgrade.
  • Good progress in respect of Advanced Light
    Fighter Aircraft (Gripen), and Maritime
    Helicopters.
  • Contracting of eight (8) A400M Aircraft to
    commence in FY2005/06.

28
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Naval Acquisition
  • Delivery of four (4) Type MEKO A-200 (SAN)
    Frigates to South Africa took place.
  • Launching of the first Type 209 Mod 1400
    submarine.
  • Construction of two multi-purpose harbour tender
    (tug boats) commenced in Feb 05.
  • Project on upgrade of SAS OUTENIQUA was closed.
  • Common Weapons Systems. Final approval of the
    DODs projects on chemical and biological defence
    was obtained.
  • Technology Development. Good progress in
    ensuring better understanding of Technology
    Acquisition Management system and projects.

29
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Procurement Service
  • Policy on the Framework on Supply Management was
    promulgated.
  • Commissioning of Weatherhaven Camping System in
    Burundi.
  • Implementation of the Supply Chain Management
    System.
  • Contracts to a total value of R264 506 364 were
    awarded. Contracts to the Historically
    Disadvantaged Individuals (HDIs) were 40.44 of
    the total value in accordance with Preferential
    Procurement Policy Framework Act.

30
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • CORPORATE STAFF DIVISION
  • Strategy and Plan Office
  • In support of the Chief of the SANDF, Office
    participated in IRPS cluster activities.
  • Involvement in the SADC regional and continental
    activities, eg development of the Common Defence
    and Security Policy, and establishment of the
    SADC Brigade.
  • Finalisation of the DOD Strategic Business Plan,
    in conjunction with Policy and Planning
    Divisions staff.
  • Direct support to the Executive Authority,
    Secretary for Defence and Chief of the SANDF in
    respect of critical management information.
  • SANDF Performance Against Plan Reports (Quarterly
    and Annual Reports)
  • Involvement in the implementation of the Parys
    Resolutions, eg Defence Update.

31
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Defence Corporate Communication
  • Ensured alignment of its strategy and plan with
    that of Govt.
  • Involvement in the implementation of the Parys
    Resolutions, especially regarding improvement of
    public image of the DOD.
  • Actively participated in the Govt Communication
    and Information System (GCIS) planning forums.
  • DOD Information Centre received 5 000 enquiries.
  • DOD website was visited 43 000 times. It was
    used for publication of DOD Strategic Business
    Plans, DOD Annual Reports, DOD Information
    Bulletins, media statements, SA Soldier editions
    and two Reserve Force publications.

32
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Military Legal Services
  • Operational legal support was rendered to 10
    ordered operations and eight (8) joint and
    multinational exercises.
  • Reviewed 37 pieces of legislation promulgated
    Govt-wide in 2004 to establish possible impact on
    the DOD.
  • Assistance was provided in the drafting of
    Implementing Arrangements in respect of Memoranda
    of Understanding, bilateral and multilateral
    agreements and diplomatic notes with various
    countries.
  • Military prosecutions took place as planned.
  • Challenges
  • No courts of Military Appeal due to
    non-availability of members of Courts of Military
    Appeal and judges to chair those courts.
  • Non-availability of witnesses and interpreters
    delayed cases.

33
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Religious Services
  • Ensured a service that promoted spiritual, social
    and ethical conduct of all DOD members.
  • Chaplains Service received three (3) awards at
    the DOD Masibambisane Awards Ceremony for
    excellent service in combating HIV and AIDS in
    the DOD.
  • A new Chaplain General was appointed.

34
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Defence Foreign Relations
  • SANDF has 26 military attaches in 23 countries
    17 non-residential accreditation in 17 other
    countries.
  • There was nearly a 40 change-over in the South
    African military attache corps.
  • Representation in the UN P5 countries (France,
    PRC, Russia, UK and US) was upgraded from rank of
    Colonel to Brigadier General.
  • Involvement in the arrangements of continental
    and regional multinational activities, esp SADC
    Organ and the ISDSC activities.
  • Challenges
  • Increased defence diplomatic activities and their
    impact on capacity.
  • The roll-over of mission accounts due to lag time
    caused by the Dept of Foreign Affairs.

35
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Reserve Component
  • Promulgation of the Strategy and Implementation
    Plan for the Renewal and Transformation of the
    Reserve Force system.
  • Council for Support of National Defence was
    successfully launched with Mr Tokyo Sexwale as
    chairperson.
  • Reserve Force Council, the statutory body
    mandated as a consultative and advisory body,
    represented the Reserve Force and it made great
    contributions during the year under review.
  • Chief of Defence Reserves continued to be
    involved in the phased withdrawal of the SANDF
    Commando System.

36
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Inspection Services
  • The Committee of Sponsoring Organization of
    Treadway (COSO) approach was adopted for internal
    audit reporting.
  • An automated audit management system (TeamMate)
    was introduced.
  • Performance Audit
  • Two external deployment audits were conducted in
    the DRC and Burundi.
  • Centre for Effect Analysis completed 95 attitude
    and opinion surveys.
  • The Effectiveness Model to measure combat
    readiness was implemented in the SA Army and SA
    Navy.

37
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Regulatory Audit
  • 155 Performance audits were conducted and 197
    certificates of condonement given for closing
    down audits. 800 Closing down audits were still
    outstanding.
  • Five overseas project offices for the Strategic
    Defence Packages were audited. It was found that
    there was great improvement in systems and
    processes used.
  • Anti-Fraud. A total of 67 investigations were
    undertaken, with 42 completed and 25 referred to
    the Military Police Agency, Legal Services or
    National Prosecution Authority.
  • Challenges
  • Long procurement processes negatively affecting
    expenditure.
  • Delays in the servicing and repair of vehicles.

38
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES
  • Direction and policy advice
  • Equal Opportunity Policy. The following policies
    were promulgated
  • Shared Values.
  • Prevention and Elimination of Unfair
    Discrimination on Grounds of Sexual Orientation.
  • Gender Equity
  • Liaison with with the National Office on the
    Status of Women.
  • Gender Focal Point successfully organised the
    South African Womens Day, in conjunction with
    the SA Navy. It also visited the Save our
    Souls School for the Blind and AIDS orphans in
    Mamelodi, Pretoria.

39
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Disability Equity
  • Nine (9) barrier-free access projects launched in
    Bloemfontein.
  • Participated in the activities of the
    Inter-Departmental Collaboration Committee on
    Disability (IDCCD) at the National Office on the
    Status of Disable Persons.
  • Affirmative Action
  • Roadshows were conducted to the Limpopo,
    Mpumalanga and Western Cape Provinces with the
    aim of popularising acceptance of the Equal
    Opportunities and Affirmative Action objectives.
  • Briefings were given to SCOPA regarding
    representivity at senior management service
    (SMS).
  • Development, Research and Evaluation. All its
    objectives were achieved as planned.

40
CHAPTER 5 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
719,700 707,649 707,649
41
CHAPTER SIX COMMAND AND CONTROL (CHAPTER 5 OF
SBP)
42
Defend and protect South Africa through the
command and control of all ordered operations by
the Defend Force as directed by Government
CHAPTER 6 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
43
CHAPTER 6 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Strategic Direction - Good progress was made in
    developing the Joint and Multinational Doctrine.
  • Operational Direction
  • Emphasis was placed on the development of
    Operational Capability Management, together with
    the African Battle Space concept.
  • Mission concepts were developed and approved by
    the Chief of the SANDF to be included in the
    Joint Defence Publications.
  • SANDF continued to render support to the SAPS,
    while the phased withdrawal from internal role
    was being implemented.
  • Peace Support Operations (Ordered Operations) -
    Details are in Table 6.1.
  • Special Operations. Successfully participated in
    a number of operations and joint exercises, such
    as Exercise GRIFFON, Exercise NICUSY and Exercise
    NEUTRON.

44
CHAPTER 6 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Internal operations - Details of operations in
    Table 6.2
  • Operation INTEXO. This continued to support SAPS
    in combating trans-border crime.
  • 11 Companies were deployed along national borders
    (Lesotho, Mozambique, Botswana and Zimbabwe) at
    any given time.
  • Various operations were conducted in the
    execution of the National Crime Prevention
    Strategy, in support of SAPS and Dept of
    Environmental Affairs and Tourism.
  • Operation STIPPER.
  • Army Territorial Reserve will continue executing
    the Rural Safety Plan, until it is phased out by
    31 March 2009.
  • First phase of SANDF/SA Police Service Exit/Entry
    Strategy was finalised.
  • Humanitarian Relief Deployments (Table 6.3)
  • Ad Hoc Deployments (6.4)

45
CHAPTER 6 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Operational successes
  • Weapons found 1 379
  • Narcotics Confiscated
  • Dagga (Marijuana) 52 992kg
  • Cocaine 42 kg
  • Mandrax 2 390 kg
  • Ecstasy 1 205 tablets
  • Livestock Recovered 3 908
  • Undocumented Migrants Apprehended 52 455
  • Stolen vehicles 57
  • Criminals arrested 7 137
  • Joint Exercises and Multinational Exercises
    (Table 6.5)

46
CHAPTER 6 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
1,218,866 1,230,675 1,230,675
47
CHAPTER SEVEN LANDWARD DEFENCE (CHAPTER 6 OF
SBP)
48
Defend and protect South Africa through
maintaining and providing prepared and supported
landward combat forces, services and facilities
that meet the requirements of Government
CHAPTER 7 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
49
CHAPTER 7 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Strategic Direction
  • 17 Commando units closed down during FY2004/05.
  • The SA Army closed 92,9 of all redundant force
    structure elements (See table 7.1).
  • Good progress with Project Phoenix (Reserves)
  • January intake of MSDS recruits 2 964
  • Infantry Capability
  • Two battalions for deployment in Burundi and the
    DRC
  • An infantry company (140 soldiers) in Sudan
  • 12 regular Force companies and 23 Reserve Force
    platoons internally under restrictive funding
    conditions.
  • Challenges
  • Main focus for force training only on forces
    deploying outside RSA.
  • The health and age of troops are still areas on
    concern.

50
CHAPTER 7 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Armour Capability
  • 103 formal military courses were conducted from
    which 1 830 learners qualified. This exceed the
    planned target of 96 courses and 1 760 learners.
  • Challenges
  • No exercises were conducted and limited
    continuation training took place, due to
    under-funding
  • Financial constraint impacted on the utilisation
    of the Rooikat armoured Car Squadron and the
    availability and serviceability of support
    vehicles
  • The age and health status of the HR component.
  • Artillery Capability
  • Realistic and functional training was conducted
    to ensure excellence in combat readiness
  • 57 courses for 1 134 learners was planned but
    only 46 courses for 966 learners were presented.

51
CHAPTER 7 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Air Defence Artillery Capability
  • Challenges
  • the SA Armys requirement to provide forces for
    Peace Support Operations
  • The ageing and health problem in the SA Army.
  • 25 formal courses were provided. Some courses
    were cancelled due to financial constraints.
  • Engineer Capability
  • Increased demands regarding deployment and
    support to operations were met.
  • 43 planned courses for 870 learners was exceeded
    with 62 courses presented for 1 458 learners.
  • It provided two Composite Engineer Squadrons for
    the African Mission in Burundi as well as for the
    UN Mission in the DRC. Approx 30 boreholes were
    sunk to provide water for local people and the UN
    forces.

52
CHAPTER 7 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Operational Intelligence Capability
  • presented 27 courses to 615 Regular Force
    learners
  • The Distance Education Programme improved and 104
    Reserve Force members pass their courses.
  • 1 Tactical Intelligence Regiment conducted a
    successful surveillance training exercise at the
    De Brug training area.
  • General Training Capability
  • Units from the SA Army Training Formation
    successfully participated in Exercise AIRBORNE
    Africa and in Exercise SEBOKA.
  • Brig General Nelwamondo was deployed throughout
    the year to DRC, assigned with to assist the
    Congolese Armed Forces with their Force
    Integration Process as part as the Governments
    peace initiatives on the Continent.

53
CHAPTER 7 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Command and Control Capability
  • 43 SA Brigade Headquarters
  • Successfully sustained commitments in the DRC in
    Operation MISTRAL (MONUC III).
  • It successfully completed the annual SA Army
    Force Preparation exercise, SEBOKA.
  • It fulfilled the vision pertaining to the
    Extended Brigade concept (4 x Tactical Group
    Headquarters which came into being in order to
    fulfill its command and control commitments in
    the theatre of operations)
  • 46 SA Brigade Headquarters
  • It participated in the development of a
    combat-readiness tool in conjunction with the
    Council for Scientific and Industrial Research
    (CSIR) resulting in improved interpretation of
    combat readiness.

54
CHAPTER 7 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Support capability
  • Efficient support to SA Army forces deployed in
    Burundi and the DRC.
  • Army general support bases provided efficient
    general logistic support to SA Army units in the
    RSA, in spite of challenges at the procurement
    centres.
  • The Support Formation is investigating a possible
    reinstatement of the Technical Support capability
    in the SA Army.

55
CHAPTER 7 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
3,325,508 3,190,407 3,190,407
56
CHAPTER EIGHT AIR DEFENCE (CHAPTER 7 OF SBP)
57
Defend and protect South Africa through
maintaining and providing prepared and supported
air combat forces, services and facilities that
meet the requirements of Government
CHAPTER 8 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
58
CHAPTER 8 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Strategic Direction
  • Air Power Doctrine was approved
  • A logistic support philosophy and strategy were
    approved.
  • Substantial progress was made regarding the
    implementation of the SA Air Force Strategic
    Transformation Plan Towards Vision 2012.
  • An Air-to-Air Missile strategy was promulgated.
  • Operational Direction
  • Air Combat Capability. The objective of 3 337
    flying hours was achieved.
  • Helicopter Capability. The objective of 10 689
    flying hours, 49 to 54 serviceable aircraft daily
    and 31 qualified aircrew daily were achieved.
  • Air Traffic Management It managed to provide
    all the required air traffic management services
    and Participated in Exercise GOLDEN EAGLE.
  • Challenges UMLINDI long-range radar systems and
    power supply system at Mariepskop.

59
CHAPTER 8 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Command and Control Capability
  • Information Technology Communications
    Management . The mobile Communications
    successfully completed 51 deployments (one still
    deployed in Burundi).
  • Ground Command and Control Management. Total
    mileage of 324 309 km was traveled, delivering 2
    515 tons of cargo.
  • Air Force Command and Control School. The school
    completed 27 courses during the year, training
    214 learners.
  • Operational Support and Intelligence Capability
  • Intelligence Capability. 15 Courses for 184
    learners were planned - 12 courses took place.
    Shortfall due to other commitments.
  • Seeker 1 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. A decision was
    taken to withdraw the Seeker 1 system and to
    retain capability with a manned platform.
  • Joint Air Reconnaissance Intelligence Centre
    (JARIC) provided image support to clients as
    required.
  • Protection Services. Specialised protection
    operations were successfully conducted.

60
CHAPTER 8 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Base Support Systems Capability
  • Basic Flying Training
  • Two pupil-pilot courses completed with 32
    learners receiving wings and 9 SAAF Reserve Force
    pilots.
  • Two flying instructor courses were completed and
    seven pilots qualified as flying instructors.
  • A total of 9 605 hours were flown by the Astra
    Fleet.
  • Navigational and Survival Training Capability.
    Four pupil navigators qualified as navigator
    instructors. Two survival courses were presented.
  • Challenges
  • Airfield systems. Limited funding for maintenance
    on runways and taxiways all SA Air Force bases.
  • Fire-fighting Service. Insufficient resources to
    maintain and repair fire-fighting vehicles,
    equipment and protective gear for fire-fighters.
  • Motor Vehicle Systems. Vehicle fleet ageing and
    serviceability status not adequate.
  • Facilities and Operational structure. Critical
    maintenance and upgrading for most of the
    operational infrastructure is needed.

61
CHAPTER 8 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Education, Training and Development Capability
  • Development Training Capability. 14 Residential
    programmes were presented at SA Air Force College
    for 284 members
  • Logistical Non-technical Training Capability.
    115 of the 137 planned courses took place at 68
    Air School and 872 learners attended.
  • Fire Training. 15 planned course took place and
    420 learners attended, with a 97 pass rate.
  • Hospitality Training. All three planned courses
    for 92 learners took place at Cookery School, Air
    Force Gymnasium. 68 Learners successfully
    completed the courses.
  • Technical Support Capability
  • Other Outputs Produced (see Table 8.1) e.g air
    tpt of DOD clients such as the President, etc

62
CHAPTER 8 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
2,222,296 2,257,493 2,257,178
Deviation between Final Appropriation and Actual
Expenditure was due to a surplus of R315 000 on
the operating funds of the Strategic Defence
Packages
63
CHAPTER NINE MARITIME DEFENCE (CHAPTER 8 OF
SBP)
64
Defend and protect South Africa through
maintaining and providing prepared and supported
maritime combat forces, services and facilities
that meet the requirements of Government
CHAPTER 9 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
65
CHAPTER 9 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Maritime Direction Capability
  • Human Resources
  • Focus on maintaining an affordable HR component
    of not more than 6 700 personnel. Good progress
    on aligning SA Navy with the requirements of SA
    Qualifications Authority.
  • Force Preparation Direction Capability - Most of
    the objectives of this capability were achieved.
  • Maritime Combat Capability
  • Surface Combat Capability. All Chief of Joint
    Operations requirements for force employment were
    met and combat-readiness objectives were
    substantially achieved.
  • Submarine Warfare Capability. There is currently
    no submarine warfare capability. Training is
    still underway for the new type 209 submarines
    to be delivered during FY2005/06.
  • Combat Support and Sea-lift Capability. This
    capability has been reduced to a replenishment
    capability, following decommissioning and sale of
    SAS OUTENIQUA. SAS DRAKENSBERG has limited
    sea-lift capability. Despite 1 200 Force
    Employment required, none were used by Joint
    Operations.

66
CHAPTER 9 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Mine Warfare and Diving Support Capability.
  • Force employment requirement of 61 hours was
    fulfilled
  • The degradation of the sonar capacity of the
    mine-hunters has caused these vessels to become
    diving support vessels.
  • Hydrographic Services Capability. SAS PROTEA was
    unable to complete her programme of survey work
    due to a prolonged refit and mechanical problems.
  • Operational Diving Capability. 4 526 Force
    employment hours were produced, instead of the 1
    200 hours originally planned.
  • Harbour Patrol and Operational Boat Squadron
    Capability. 2 244.5 Force preparation hours and
    687 force employment hours were produced, instead
    of 50 hours planned for the latter. Provided
    support to the SAPS for bottom searches,
    recovery, security patrols and VIP escort duties.

67
CHAPTER 9 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Inshore Patrol Capability
  • Limited use of force preparation hours due to
    unsatisfactory combat readiness state. Vessels
    were effective in anti-poaching patrols.
  • Force employment hours were over-estimated only
    168.5 (20) hours were used of the planned 850
    hours.
  • Maritime Logistic Capability
  • Dockyard capability. Dockyard Transfer Agreement
    to transfer dockyard to Armscor was signed.
  • Publications Provisions Capability. Photographic
    service and warfare publications control service
    were provided to all SA Navy units.
  • Logistic Warehousing Capability. Main focus on
    disposal of excess and obsolete stock.

68
CHAPTER 9 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Challenges
  • Lack of codification service.
  • Diminishing workforce at the Naval Engineering
    Service.
  • Lack of specifications capability.
  • Final decision regarding disposal of the
    remaining two DAPHNE Class Submarines still
    pending.
  • Lack of Strikecraft spares.
  • Inadequate perimeter security, which led to
    break-ins and loss of state equipment.
  • Maritime Training Capability (see tables 9.1 to
    9.6)
  • General Base Support Capability
  • Duplex housing for Junior Ratings was completed..
  • Executive objectives achieved. Challenge
    Disposal of unserviceable, redundant and obsolete
    stores is very slow due to shortage of personnel.
  • Naval Harbour Master. Supply of an effective
    one-stop harbour service was achieved. Challenge
    Crew shortages, due to arrival of two patrol
    corvettes and sea trials.

69
CHAPTER 9 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Other Outputs in Support to Govt
  • IRPS Cluster. Participation in the ISDSCs
    Standing Maritime Committee.
  • JCPS Cluster
  • Team of 23 members was deployed (Operation
    NEPTUNE) to assist the Marine and Coastal
    Management Service in fighting poaching and
    ongoing operation (Operation INTEXO) to assist in
    anti-poaching patrols on the East and West coasts
    up to Mozambique.
  • GA Cluster. Co-operated with the National Dept
    of Transport in developing the maritime agenda.
  • Defence Diplomacy. Received study tour groups
    from other military establishments (Germany, the
    United Arab Emirates and the US), staff talks
    with India and Pakistan. Received 11 foreign
    ships on goodwill and working visits. Navy
    personnel also visited abroad, esp as part of the
    Strategic Defence Packages (SDPs).

70
CHAPTER 9 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
1,092,571 1,100,822 1,100,822
71
CHAPTER TEN MILITARY HEALTH SERVICE (CHAPTER 9
OF SBP)
72
Provide prepared and supported military health
capabilities,services and facilities in support
of the defence of South Africa that meet the
requirements of Government
CHAPTER 10 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
73
CHAPTER 10 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Strategic Direction
  • Main focus improving business processes by
    concentrating on outputs. A Public-Private
    Partnerships between the DOD and private medical
    facilities was to be entered into so as to effect
    financial savings.
  • Military Health Support
  • Provided combat ready Military Medical task
    groups for Burundi, DRC and in Sudan and 43
    Patients were medically evacuated from Burundi
    and the DRC.
  • Three provincial clinics were upgraded in Limpopo
    and Mpumalanga provinces, and 6 100 local people
    were treated. Disaster management training was
    provided to 60 members of Limpopo Province
    Emergency Services.
  • Lectures were presented on chemical, biological
    and radiation capability in the SANDF, incl
    personnel from the DRC and Burundi.

74
CHAPTER 10 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Force Preparation
  • Training was provided to Reserve Force members
    wrt Basic Ambulance Assistants course (73),
    Battle Support course (80) and operational
    readiness courses.
  • Challenges
  • Shortage of deployable Operational Emergency Care
    Practitioners.
  • Conversion from AMIB to ONUB impacted negatively
    on the structure of the task group provided.
  • 7 Medical Battalion Group was only 56 staffed
    which affects combat readiness.
  • Logistic support systems and General Support Base
    structures.
  • Area Military Health Service
  • Provided health facilities within 30km for 90 of
    patients as planned.
  • Services were rendered to the Presidency, serving
    SANDF members, their dependents, retired members
    and services in support of other State Depts as
    approved.

75
CHAPTER 10 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Specialist/Tertiary Health Service
  • Rendered service to approx 69 000 serving SANDF
    members and their dependents, 17 000 Code 4 and
    Code 7 members, retired SANDF members, Govt VIPs
    and Govt approved patients (eg from the United
    Nations and SADC).
  • Services rendered (see Table 10.4)
  • Aviation Health services (see Table 10.5)
  • Services rendered by Military Psychological
    Institute (see Table 10.6)
  • Maritime Health and Base Orientated Services (see
    Table 10.7)
  • Veterinary Health Services (see Table 10.8)

76
CHAPTER 10 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Product Support Capability. Military Health Base
    Depot provided services to deployed SANDF members
    in Burundi, DRC, and Sudan.
  • Challenge Facilities do not comply with
    Occupational Health and Safety Act. New
    warehousing will be obtained soon.
  • Base Support Capability. Achieved
  • Military Health Training Capability
  • 1 623 Learners were trained on 25 courses from
    basic training to SA Military Health Service
    Senior Management courses.
  • Significant progress was made with the
    accreditation of courses with the South African
    Qualifications Authority.
  • Courses presented (see Table 10.10)
  • Presented five Nursing Courses (see Table 10.11).
  • Military Health Combat Training Centre presented
    courses through simulated operations.

77
CHAPTER 10 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Joint Physical Sport and Recreation Centre. A
    partnership was entered into between SAMHS and
    the University of Free Staff Sport Institute in
    order to identify sport talent in that province.
    The Centre was also involved in the fund-raising
    for the Vhembe Orphanage as part of community
    service.
  • Challenge Capacity in respect of logistics,
    financial and human resources in order to support
    the Military Skills Development System (MSDS)
    learners.
  • Occupational Health and Safety (OHS).
  • Occupational health and safety policies are
    implemented.
  • Health assessments and occupational hygiene
    survey are conducted to enhance operational
    readiness.
  • Challenges
  • Lack of dedicated personnel.
  • Management of non-compliance with Facilities
    Regulations and Ammunition and Explosives
    Regulations of the OHS Act. This is restricted
    by budgetary constraints.

78
CHAPTER 10 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Outputs to Government. Achieved
  • IRPS Cluster
  • Briefings to neighbouring countries regarding HIV
    and AIDS awareness projects.
  • Participated in SADCs ISDSC Health Workgroup.
  • Presented a course to 27 delegates from
    Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical
    Weapons.
  • Continued to provide forces to Central Africa as
    required by Joint Operations.
  • GA Cluster
  • Mobile theatres were provided to Gauteng Dept of
    Health for utilisation at Kalafong Hospital.
  • Services rendered to patients outside the DOD are
    reflected in Table 10.12.

79
CHAPTER 10 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
1,305,560 1,340,906 1,340,906
80
CHAPTER ELEVEN DEFENCE INTELLIGENCE (CHAPTER
10 OF SBP)
81
Defend and protect South Africa by the provision
of timely and accurate military intelligence and
counter-intelligence products and services that
meet the requirements of Government
CHAPTER 11 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
82
CHAPTER 11 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • The first Defence Intelligence Sub-committee
    Intelligence Course was presented successfully in
    Zimbabwe.
  • Defence Intelligence is also involved in
    assisting security management on the continent,
    for example in Uganda, Côte d'Ivoire and the
    Sudan.
  • Defence Intelligence personnel continue to play
    an important role in support of Government's
    efforts to facilitate a cease-fire and peace
    agreements in Burundi and the Democratic Republic
    of the Congo.
  • Defence Intelligence supported SANDF elements
    before, during and after deployment in the
    Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi and
    supported Exercise MEDFLAG, Exercise AIRBORNE
    AFRICA Aerospace Africa Defence Exhibition 2004.
    This support led to valuable operational
    information being obtained.

83
CHAPTER 11 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • The collection capability was extended during the
    report
  • period, and a number of geospatial products and
    services were delivered or are being upgraded.
  • During the last quarter of the period under
    review Defence Intelligence also provided
    training to the Economic Community of West
    African States early warning centre staff.
  • Defence Intelligence played a major role in
    drafting the National Security Framework.
  • Conduct intelligence exchange conferences with
    specific partners and also provides intelligence
    exchange documents to identified foreign
    intelligence partners.
  • Initiated structural changes to improve both its
    early warning and situation room.

84
CHAPTER 5 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Challenges
  • Availability of skilled personnel due to external
    deployments and resignations.
  • Insufficient collection capability that is
    supported by appropriate technology.
  • Inability to re-locate the Defence Intelligence
    HQ building.
  • Limited access to training, esp SA Army courses,
    which hampers career development of members.

85
CHAPTER 11 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
145,820 138,162 138,162
86
CHAPTER TWELVE JOINT SUPPORT (CHAPTER 11 OF
SBP)
87
Strategic direction, joint logistics, command and
management information, military policing, joint
training, reskilling and resettlement and human
resources support capabilities, services and
facilities for the defence and protection of
South Africa and support to its people that meet
the prescribed combat readiness, operational and
other requirements of Government.
CHAPTER 12 MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE
88
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Strategic Direction. Joint Support Office
    provided strategies, policies, plans and
    instructions in support to the Chief of the
    SANDF.
  • Human Resource Support and Management
  • Planned recruitment target of 250 members for the
    Youth Foundation was achieved.
  • A total of 814 530 applications for MSDS were
    processed for the January 2005 intakes for the
    SANDF.
  • Timely payment of deployed members allowances.
  • Out of possible 360 members of the DOD, 209 were
    successfully transferred to the SAPS.
  • Project on Non-Statutory force (NSF) Pension did
    not progress well
  • Majority of 21 000 NSF members who joined SANDF
    since 1994 are no longer in service of the DOD
    (resignations, discharge or retirement) Focus on
    non-serving members.
  • DOD has received so far 13 130 applications, of
    which more than 2 000 were submitted to Govt
    Employee Pension Fund for payment.

89
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Challenges
  • Restructuring of Human Resources Functions.
  • Final Force Design and Structure.
  • Marketing, Recruiting and Selection Funds. Lack
    of funds and support.
  • Personnel Maintenance Functions. Absence of
    delegations and various DOD policy prescripts.
  • New SANDF Leave Dispensation. The implementation
    of a new leave dispensation for SANDF members,
    without a computerised leave system to support
    the execution.
  • Non-statutory Force Pension Project. Delayed by
    the verification of incorrect addresses as well
    as incorrect and incomplete application forms.

90
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Joint Logistic Services
  • Policy developments. Two policies were completed.
  • An Ammunition Disposal Risk Management Plan was
    developed.
  • Codification contract with LogTek. Process
    underway to capacitate DOD through training.
  • Logistical Training. Achieved
  • Technical Training. Achieved
  • Objective achieved accept Rm 143 was allocated
    for the maintenance of facilities, but this fell
    short of Rm 300 which was required.
  • Environmental Management. Achieved

91
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Joint Logistic Services
  • Challenges
  • Changing the culture of the silo strategic
    management process in the materiel function into
    a single integrated process.
  • Lack of progress in the disposal of Category 2
    equipment due to delay in the appointment of
    auctioneers.
  • Implementation of a single accounting system.
  • The preparation and migration of present asset
    accounting data to the required standards as set
    by National Treasury.
  • Transfer of stores administration functions to
    the Services could help reduce number of negative
    audit findings made every year.
  • Registration of DOD vehicles on the National
    Transport Information System.
  • Guidelines on the clearance from land of
    unexploded ordnance.
  • Increased participation of the SANDF in peace
    missions, putting a strain on logistical support
    resources

92
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Command and Management Information Systems
  • Policy developments. Achieved
  • 6 Signal Regiments activities (Reserve Force
    capability) were hampered by lack of funding.
  • School of Signals presented 49 courses to 1 225
    learners.
  • Challenges
  • Buy-in from Services and Divisions regarding
    Information Warfare capability.
  • Necessity to obtain mandate for Network Warfare
    capability.
  • Compliance with the Information and Communication
    Systems Security Policy.
  • Insufficient capacity and signal equipment.
  • Health status and the testing thereof for
    deployment purposes.
  • Establishment of Comsec (Pty) Ltd not finalised.

93
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Service Corps
  • Project to train 4 350 military veterans has
    taken off.
  • Actively participating as an enabler in preparing
    the DOD volunteers to transfer to the SAPS.
  • Completion of the Centre for Advanced Training
    accommodation complex.
  • Adult Basic Education and Training continued to
    be provided to 68 Public Service Act Personnel.
  • Rm 1.5 was allocated to upgrade the Practical
    Business School Mankwe to accommodate the SAPS.
  • Challenges
  • Client throughput planning forecasts.
  • Information systems for the Service Corps
    business.
  • Cost of facilities, training disciplines and
    instructors.
  • Political imperatives for the migration of the
    Service Corps out of the DOD and promulgation of
    Service Corps Act.
  • Accreditation with the SA Qualifications
    Authority and Employment requirements for
    Clients.

94
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Joint Training
  • Policy Development
  • DOD Instruction on Management of Learner
    Assessment was promulgated.
  • DOD Instruction and Joint Defence Publication on
    General Education and Training, Further Education
    and Training, and Higher Education and Training
    were promulgated.
  • Two ENSP programmes were successfully presented
    at the SA National Defence College, with 6
    foreign learners attending each.
  • SA National War College completed its third
    JSCSP. 96 of the initial 100 learners
    successfully completed the programme.
  • A total of 21 simulation exercises were completed.

95
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Military Academy
  • There was improvement in representivity among
    academic staff with the appointment of Black
    academics.
  • 80 of 170 MSDS learners received their
    Certificates.
  • Challenge. Establishment of the African Centre
    for Defence and Security Leadership at the
    Military Academy could not be pursued due to lack
    of funding.

96
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Military Police
  • Provided high quality service to peace missions
    as required.
  • Crime prevention operations were conducted, and
    in some cases with the SAPS.
  • Provided service for searching activities at the
    Air Force Base Waterkloof.
  • Other Successes
  • Retrieved stolen equipment to the value of R1 008
    746.
  • Issued traffic fines to the value of R210 850.
  • Arrested 353 military members and 168 DOD
    employees.

97
CHAPTER 12 ACHIEVEMENTS CHALLENGES
  • Other Outputs produced (see Table 12.19)
  • Support to Govt (IRPS and GA cluster)
    activities.
  • Challenges
  • Initiative to replace Mamba vehicles.
  • Implementation of the Electronic Crime
    Administration System.
  • Military Police Structure to be re-designed.

98
CHAPTER 12 ENE
Strategic Business Plan FY2004/05 (VOTE 22) R000 Final Appropriation R000 Actual Payment R000
2,303,399 2,400,705 2,400,013
Deviation between Final Appropriation and Actual
Expenditure was due to a surplus of R692 000
99
  • QUESTIONS
About PowerShow.com