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Deck Seamanship Safety

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Personal Protective Gear. Loose Clothing ... Cat and Arresting gear. Wing Maintenance. Wing Quality Control ... Photo Mates. Helo L.S.E. 2001 By Default! ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Deck Seamanship Safety


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Deck Seamanship Safety
3
Learning Objectives
  • Know the general dangers involved with shipboard
    deck evolutions.
  • Explain the role of Officers as safety observers
    during deck evolutions.
  • Know the terms and nomenclature of shipboard deck
    equipment and fittings.

4
Learning Objectives
  • Know responsibilities and safety precautions
    relative to small boat operations.
  • Know the importance of "common sense" in
    identifying general deck safety hazards.

5
Fundamental Philosophy of Deck Seamanship
  • A ship is an industrial environment and it is a
    dangerous place to work.
  • It can be made safe by
  • Taking care
  • Using common sense
  • Not hurrying

6
Where officers fit into the picture
  • Most junior enlisted sailors feel that they are
    immune from danger.
  • It is the senior personnel who must ensure that
    they don't find out how wrong they are!
  • The safety officer must resist the temptation to
    get involved in the activities.
  • Focus on big picture
  • Allow the sailor to do the job!

7
Personal Protective Equipment
  • Nearly 2 million people are expected to receive
    disabling work related injuries this year.
  • More than ¼ of these injuries will involve the
    head, eyes, hands, or feet.
  • PPE can prevent many of these injuries.

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Personal Protective Gear
  • Hard Hats / Cranial
  • Topside work or underway replenishment
  • What will it protect you from?
  • White is the hard hat color worn by officers and
    other safety/supervisory personnel

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Cranial Videos
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Cranial FODs intake of A-6
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Personal Protective Gear
  • Loose Clothing
  • Anytime work is being done around rotating
    machinery, or any moving system, loose clothing
    becomes dangerous.

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Personal Protective Gear
  • Flotation Devices
  • Life jackets and other personal flotation devices
    should be worn when common sense dictates.
  • On the flight deck, or during combat conditions,
    where a kapok-type life preserver is too bulky,
    other means (CO2 inflatable preservers) are
    substituted.

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Purple (aka - Grapes)
  • Aviation Fuels

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Blue
  • Plane handlers
  • Elevator operators
  • Tractor drivers
  • Messengers
  • Phone Talkers

24
Green
  • Cat and Arresting gear
  • Wing Maintenance
  • Wing Quality Control
  • Cargo Handlers
  • Ground Support Personnel
  • Hook Runners
  • Photo Mates
  • Helo L.S.E.

25
Yellow
  • Aircraft Handling Officer
  • Cat and Arresting Gear Officer
  • Plane Director

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Red
  • Ordnance
  • Crash and Salvage
  • Explosives Ordnance Disposal (E.O.D.)

27
Brown
  • Air Wing Plane Captains
  • Leading Petty Officers
  • (LPOs)

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White
  • Squadron Plane Inspectors
  • Landing Signal Officer
  • (LSO)
  • Air Transfer Officer
  • (ATO)
  • Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Crews
  • Safety Observers
  • Medical Personnel

29
Ground tackle, Anchoring, and Mooring
  • The number one safety rule
  • Never stand in the bight of a line or cable!
  • Pre-brief

30
Anchoring
  • With ground tackle and anchoring, a yellow "shot"
    of anchor chain is a warning, and a red "shot" is
    danger.
  • Letting go of the anchor should be done slowly
    and with great control
  • but if the anchor is "free falling" out of
    control and one of these shots appears, get out
    of the way!

31
Mooring
  • When mooring, ensure that all line handlers are
    in safe zones when working tensioned lines.
  • Keep an eye on the tattletales and on the general
    motion of the ship.
  • Personnel on the bridge are more concerned about
    maneuvering and positioning the ship, and it is
    easy to loose the big picture regarding lines.

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Cargo Handling and UNREP
  • Safety is an issue anytime weight is being
    handled, especially during cargo onloads or
    offloads and during UNREPs.
  • The following general precautions must be
    followed
  • Pre-Brief
  • Training

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Cargo Handling and UNREP
  • Stand clear of the load. Never get between a
    load and the ship.
  • It is amazing how many people think they can get
    on one side of a 5 ton load and push it into
    position.
  • Do not allow someone to get trapped between the
    load and a bulkhead.

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Rope vs. Line
  • Ropes
  • Manufactured from wire, fiber, or a combination
    of the two.
  • Lines
  • Fiber rope
  • Natural cotton, hemp
  • Synthetic nylon, polyester, polypropylene,
    polyethylene

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Working with lines and rope
  • Gloves
  • When working with wire rope, a person must wear
    gloves. There are many "fishhooks" (fragments of
    wire) that can cut a hand, and the grease that
    covers most rope is not good for an open cut.

41
Working with lines and rope
  • Gloves
  • When handling line, however, a person should
    generally not wear gloves (avoids getting caught
    in lay of line)
  • Keep hands at least 18 inches from a bit,
    pad-eye, or snatch block.

42
Working with lines and rope
  • Parting
  • Wire ropes part just like lines do, and care
    should be taken not to rush evolutions that
    involve wire rope.
  • Although it doesn't tend to snap back like
    synthetic line, a parting rope or line is
    dangerous.

43
Working with lines and rope
  • Deterioration
  • The biggest danger with natural fiber lines is
    rotting.
  • That is the advantage of synthetic fiber lines
    even though they "snap back" when parted.

44
Synthetic Line Snapback
  • Synthetic lines, when parted, react like a
    rubber band. Always keep this in mind when
    working with synthetic line. Stand in safe
    zones.
  • Pay attention to "tattletales" which will part
    before the line they are spliced into parts.
  • Film Synthetic Line Snapback

45
Life lines, life rails, and safety chains
  • Life lines
  • Flexible lines rigged between stanchions to
    prevent falls (note not to lean on).
  • Life rails
  • Permanent rails set up to prevent falls.
  • Safety Chains
  • Are rigged around an open hatch in a deck.
  • They prevent people from falling where a
    permanent fixture is not possible.

46
Conclusion
  • Common sense is the name of the game. If it
    looks wrong, it probably is.
  • Thorough training and briefing will pay off in
    the long run.
  • Doing the job correctly usually means doing it
    slowly.

47
The number of accidents in the fleet today is
surprisingly low considering the type of work
done. It is up to the officer to keep it that way
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