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Promoting an Intentional Institutional Commitment to Learning Centeredness: Active vs. Passive Leadership Assessment of Student Learning Conference

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Cognitive Outcomes. Content. Grades. Other Goals (Academic ... KNOWLEDGE OF COURSE CONTENT. LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES. COGNITIVE OR INTELLECTUAL OUTCOMES ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Promoting an Intentional Institutional Commitment to Learning Centeredness: Active vs. Passive Leadership Assessment of Student Learning Conference


1
Promoting an Intentional Institutional
Commitment to Learning Centeredness Active vs.
Passive LeadershipAssessment of Student
Learning ConferenceEvaluating Institutional
Learning CenterednessSan Diego, CAJuly 13,
2007
  • James A. Anderson, Ph.D.
  • Vice President for Student Success
  • Vice Provost for Institutional Assessment and
    Diversity
  • Professor of Psychology
  • University at Albany, SUNY
  • jaanderson_at_uamail.albany.edu

2
Learning Centered Institutions
  • Seamless Integration of
  • Commitment to IE Accountability
  • Conceptual Model
  • Appropriate Program Outcomes
  • Appropriate Student-Learning Outcomes
  • Integration of Co-Curricular and Academic Support
    Outcomes
  • Teaching Community and Faculty Development
    Outcomes
  • New or Reallocated Resource Support
  • Transformational Leadership

3
Conceptual Model
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (Boyer,
    1990)
  • Teaching Commons and Learning Community (Huber
    Hutchings, 2005)
  • Assessment Program and Outcomes
  • Socio-Academic Engagement (Kuh et al., 2005)
  • Documenting the Work of Teaching and Learning
    (electronic course portfolios)
  • - MIT (Open Courseware Project)
  • - Keep Toolkit (Carnegie Foundation)
  • Instructional Technology and Scholarship of
    Teaching and Learning
  • - Visible Knowledge Project (Georgetown
    University)

4
Learning-Centered Paradigm (Barr Tagg, 1995)
  • Assumptions
  • Students learn significantly more when they are
    engaged in active self-directed learning.
  • Students learn significantly more when they view
    the instructor as a guide and facilitator.
  • Students learn more when they receive frequent,
    prompt, and effective feedback on their
    performance.
  • Faculty are intentionally motivated to help
    students learn (and to know what learning is
    occurring).

5
Learning-Centered Paradigm (contd)
  1. Faculty assume that their own teaching/learning
    strategies are responsible if a significant
    number of students do not achieve their learning
    goals.
  2. Assessment is essential to helping faculty
    understand what is and isnt working and how to
    improve their teaching/learning/curricula
    strategies.
  3. The benefits of good assessment produce clear
    advantages for students, faculty and
    administrators and address issue of
    accountability.

6
  • Accountability
  • Focuses on results and the expectation that
    institutions (and their programs) quantify or
    provide evidence that they are meeting their
    stated mission, goals, and objectives. It refers
    to the increasing demand from a variety of
    constituencies to demonstrate institutional
    effectiveness by focusing on QUALITY measures
  • Efficiency productivity and cost.
  • Outputs measures of a programs activity such
    as
  • people served, and activities and services
    performed.

7
Accountability (contd)
  • Outcomes focuses on people (satisfaction with a
    program or service).
  • Student Outcomes institution-based aggregate
    statistics on groups of students (graduation
    rates, retention rates, transfer rates, etc.)
  • Student Learning/Development Outcomes concerned
    with attributes and abilities which reflect how
    student experiences at the institution supported
    their development as individuals.

8
Why Is There So Much Emphasis On Accountability?
  • Values have shifted from higher education as a
    social good to its immediate impact on the
    economic system and the workforce.
  • The increased cost of postsecondary education
    influences heightened scrutiny.
  • External constituents dont trust the
    self-regulating processes that colleges/universiti
    es utilize to demonstrate effectiveness.
  • When citizens pay taxes, they expect a level of
    service and proof of a return on investment.

9
Why Is There So Much Emphasis On Accountability?
(contd)
  • e) What value added did the students receive for
    the education they just paid for?
  • More pressure from watchdog groups
    (Congressional, political, foundations, etc.)
  • Our own failure to emphasize outcomes and results
    as opposed to inputs and procedures.

10
Fundamental and Necessary Considerations
  • What is the value-added aspect (to students) of
    an institutions Learning-Centered focus?
  • What is the opportunity cost to an institution of
    its own failure to emphasize outcomes and results
    as opposed to inputs and procedures?
  • Is your institutions approach to implementing a
    Learning-Centered philosophy
  • a) based on a generic model (applicable to all
    students) or one that targets the unique needs
    of diverse populations?
  • b) cognizant of resource implications and cost
    effectiveness?
  • c) a composite working model of academic and
    co-curricular collaborations?
  • d) accountable to the point that Learning
    Centeredness and Effective Leadership are
    complimentary, and if they are not, what does
    this mean?

11
What Questions Influence Planning and
Decision-Making
  • Since many of your students are commuters and
    nontraditional, do they have the benefit of
    on-line/virtual advising that they can assess
    when they need to? Has the college conducted a
    systematic evaluation of its advising efforts?
  • How familiar are the faculty and support staff
    with the best research, best models and best
    practices on student involvement/integration,
    effective teaching, diversity, etc. ?
  • What are the incentives for non-academic offices
    to contribute to the academic success of student?
    How is that contribution measured?

12
What Questions Influence Planning and
Decision-Making (cont)
  • What metrics/indicators might be utilized when
    administrators and program directors are
    evaluated for their contributions to the
    Learning-centered vision of you college?
  • Excluding the presence of diverse groups at your
    college, how effective has your college been in
    the promotion of diversity? What is your answer
    based on?
  • What are some of the major questions that you
    would like your college to address that have
    significant value?
  • Is evidence-based decision-making a normative
    exercise in administrative planning? If not,
    then what are the primary factors that influence
    decision-making?

13
Meaningful Use of Data(from Peggy Maki, Ph.D.)
  • Collect data from different sources to make a
    meaningful point (for example, program samples
    and other samples of student work).
  • Collect data you believe will be useful to
    answering the important questions you have
    raised.
  • Collect data that will help you make decisions
    for continuous improvement.
  • Organize reports around issues, not solely data.
  • Interpret your data so that it informs program
    improvement, budgeting, planning,
    decision-making, or policies.

14
The Most Important Qualities of Assessment
(Source Bresciani, 2003a.)
  • Meaningful in that it is faculty- and
    co-curricular specialist- or expert-driven
  • Manageable in that it considers varying resources
  • Flexible in that it factors in assessment
    learning curves
  • Truth-seeking, objective, and ethical
  • Informs decisions for continuous improvement or
    provides evidence of proof
  • Promotes a culture of accountability, learning,
    and improvement

15
Program Outcomes
  • Students in your program will develop positive
    attitudes towards learning and increase their
    commitment and responsibility for their own
    learning
  • Pre-post gains or comparison with matched pair
    cohort on dimensions like academic skills,
    critical thinking, values toward learning, etc.
  • Develop a plan of study
  • Develop a learning portfolio
  • Learning Environment Preferences Survey (Perry
    Scheme)

16
Do You Have
  • A philosophy of teaching and teaching excellence
  • Connected to a model of learning
  • Which acknowledges characteristics of the learner
  • and the learning environment
  • Which utilizes appropriate strategies, tools, and
    techniques
  • And which incorporates assessment and evaluation
    in order to maintain quality

17
Teaching for Retention
  • Teaching for Student Outcomes
  • Cognitive Outcomes
  • Content
  • Grades
  • Other Goals (Academic Nonacade3mic
  • Competency Testing
  • Placement Testing
  • Teaching with Support Services
  • Tutoring
  • Advising
  • Mentoring
  • Connection to Centers (Learning, Writing)
  • Academic Affairs Student Affairs
    Interface
  • Connection to Developmental Programs
  • Faculty Development (Incentives)

18
  • TEACHING GOALS INFLUENCE DECISIONS
  • ABOUT GRADING
  • TEACHING FOR
  • KNOWLEDGE OF COURSE CONTENT
  • LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES
  • COGNITIVE OR INTELLECTUAL OUTCOMES
  • CLASSROOM OUTCOMES (TEAMWORK, ETC.)
  • NONACADEMIC OUTCOMES (COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT)
  • SKILL COMPETENCIES (WRITING, READING, SPEAKING,
    ETC.)
  • UTILIZATION OF ACADEMIC SUPPORTS

19
  • HELPING STUDENTS TO ESTABLISH A POSITION ON
    INQUIRYGUIDED LEARNING (IGL)
  • MAP THE CHRONOLOGY OF LEARNING (STUDENT
  • ORIENTATION)
  • INVOLVE STUDENTS IN RECOGNIZING HOW THEY LEARN
  • PROVIDE EXAMPLES FROM UPPER LEVEL STUDENTS WHO
  • ARE SIMILAR TO YOUR CURRENT STUDENTS
  • INTEGRATE ASSESSMENT ALONG THE CONTINUUM OF
  • LEARNING
  • HOLD STUDENTS ACCOUNTABLE FOR THINKING ABOUT
    THEIR
  • OWN THINKING AND LEARNING
  • HAVE STUDENTS DISCUSS THEIR PROGRESS OVER TIME
  • TOWARD A DESIRED OUTCOME AND THEN ENGAGE IN
    SELF-
  • REFLECTION

20
  • COURSE FIELD BIOLOGY
  • COURSE THEMES
  • THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION AND ITS IMPORTANCE TO
    BIOLOGY
  • THE IDEA OF HIERARCHIAL STRUCTURE AND THE
  • INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN LEVEL OF COMPLEXITY
  • THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
  • THE IDEAS OF FEEDBACK MECHANISM AND CONTROL
  • THE IMPORTANCE OF THE QUESTIONING APROACH
  • - THE IDEA THAT SCIENCE IS A STATE-OF-THE-ART
    DISCIPLINE

21
Role of Prior Knowledge
  • When designing instruction in STEM disciplines
    the
  • following four questions should be considered
  • What breadth and depth of prior knowledge do your
    students have?
  • Do they understand where your discipline fits in
    with all the other disciplines which they are
    taking classes?
  • How much do they know about the other related
    disciplines?
  • What kind of connections do they have to make
    between what you are teaching and those other
    disciplines in order to succeed in learning in
    your class?

22
USING THE NEW YORK TIMES TO IMPACT COURSE GOALS
AND GRADING IN INTRODUCTORY AMERICAN
GOVERNMENT INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGY
THROUGHOUT THE SEMESTER STUDENTS RECEIVE
WORKSHEETS BASED ON CURRENT NYT ARTICLES AS SMALL
GROUP EXERCISES THAT GIVE THEM PRACTICE IN
APPLYING COURSE CONCEPTS AND KNOWLEDGE. THE
ARTICLES ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN LECTURES TO
PROVIDE EXAMPLES OF HOW CONCEPTS AND KNOWLEDGE
CAN BE APPLIED. OVER HALF OF THE FINAL
COURSE GRADE CONSISTS OF SCORES ON 10 SHORT
GRADED ESSAYS BASED ON THE NYT ARTICLES. STUDENTS
RECEIVE A COPY OF A CURRENT ARTICLE WITH ITS
PARAGRAPHS NUMBERED. EACH GRADED EXERCISE ASKS
THE SAME QUESTIONS
23
  • 1. WHAT GENERAL CONCEPTS AND SPECIFIC
    INFORMATION ABOUT POLITICS (COVERED IN CLASS
    AND/OR IN THE TEXTBOOK) CAN YOU USE TO UNDERSTAND
    WHAT IS DESCRIBED IN THE ARTICLE?
  • FOR EACH CONCEPT OR PIECE OF INFORMATION, DISCUSS
    BRIEFLY HOW IT APPLIES TO A SPECIFIC PARAGRAPH IN
    THE ARTICLE (REFER TO THE PARAGRAPH NUMBER). MAKE
    SURE THAT YOU CONFINE YOUR ANSWER TO A DISCUSSION
    OF HOW CONCEPTS AND INFORMATION CAN BE APPLIED.
  • Source James Eisenstein
  • Professor, Political Science
  • Pennsylvania State University

24
ALCOA ProjectCourse Introductory Physical
Chemistry (CH 331) Dr. Laura Sremaniak Ms.
Sheila Maness
  • Objectives
  • Cultivating the cognitive and affective domains
  • Creating an awareness of student responsibility
    to learning
  • Incorporating a historical context to course
    material
  • Bringing abstract ideas into an understanding
    format
  • Utilizing case studies to establish relevance to
    students disciplinary interests

25
Diversity Outcomes Global Outcomes Shared Curricular- Co-curricular Outcomes Classroom Climate
University/ College Goals/Objectives Outcomes
Department/ Program Goals/Objectives Outcomes
Student Learning And Development Outcomes
Evidence of Achieved Outcome
Target Population
26
Diversity as an Intellectual or Educational
Experience What Student Outcomes Do You Expect?
  • Deeper understanding of
  • Different cultures, people
  • Perspectives
  • Disciplines
  • Enhance analytical and decision-making skills
  • Comfortable with ambiguity and conflict
  • Openness to growth through dialogue in
    pluralistic communities (offshoot become global
    communicators)
  • Ability to analyze and understand persuasive
    arguments
  • Inclusion of voice of underrepresented students

27
Value the Richness of Diversity
  • Demonstrate willingness to learn from and enter
    into divergent viewpoints including culture,
    gender, lifestyle, religion, ethnicity
  • Restate issues from divergent points of view
  • Acknowledge the validity of others perspectives
  • Analyze events, issues or conflicts from
    different cultural perspectives
  • Interpret media from the perspective of its
    cultural context
  • Communicate from a perspective that acknowledges
    others contexts and experiences

28
Diversity and Critical Thinking
  • How do we help students to connect the
    intellectual/academic concept (diversity) to its
    social/political reality?
  • What aspect of the aforementioned discussion
    involves risk-taking for the student, and how
    does this inhibit critical thinking?
  • What is the students current way of knowing and
    what does the instructor do with this information?

29
Diversity and Critical Thinking (Cont)
  • What was taught in previous courses and what will
    be taught in later courses?
  • In classes where students are diverse, what
    ground rules should the instructor establish
    about
  • The nature of communication
  • The occurrence of conflict
  • The nature of small group interaction
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