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Technology Promoting Student Excellence: A preliminary analysis of the first year of New Hampshire

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Fall 2004 Teacher Survey Follow Up (n=32) ... 32 teachers across the six schools responded to an online follow up survey (n=32 in all cases) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Technology Promoting Student Excellence: A preliminary analysis of the first year of New Hampshire


1
Technology Promoting Student ExcellenceA
preliminary analysis of the first year of New
Hampshires 11 laptop program
  • Damian Bebell
  • Lynch School of Education
  • Boston College
  • bebell_at_bc.edu

2
Full evaluation report and PowerPoint slides will
be available for download at www.intasc.org
3
History of Educational Technology
  • Purported Benefits
  • Motivate and Engage students
  • Increase resources and information
  • Exposure to technology (21st century skills)
  • Improve teaching (lesson plans, communication)
  • Movement towards student centered classrooms
  • Streamline record keeping
  • Special Needs/Accommodations
  • Differentiate Instruction/learning

4
Trends in Educational Technology
  • In the late 80s a trend emerged that technology
    was good for students so that they will be
    prepared for the technology jobs/skills of the
    future
  • Current thinking is that technology is a vehicle
    for improved student learning of traditional
    curriculum

5
Student Computer Ratios
  • Standard Metric of technology access
  • National StudentComputer Ratios
  • 1251 1983
  • 91 1995
  • 61 1998
  • 41 2003
  • Source Market Data Retrieval, 1999 Education
    Week, 2004

Technology is shared
Use is sporadic (lots of research)
6
Movement towards 11 technology
  • Each teacher and student has full access to a
    computer (usually laptop)
  • Previous research suggests
  • Equity issues disappear
  • Technology becomes the relied upon tool students
    use for research, writing, and presentation
  • Classroom management is simplified
  • Students are more engaged enthusiastic

7
Current 11 laptop programs
  • Maine Learning Technology Initiative (2002)
  • All 7th and 8th grade students and teachers in
    239 middle schools
  • Apple iBooks, wireless classrooms,teacher
    training, support, and professional development
  • 1,000 flowers blossoming philosophy
  • Henrico County, VA (2002)
  • Apple iBooks in Grades 6th-12th
  • 20,000 students
  • No systemic research or evaluation
  • Massachusetts (3 Berkshire middle schools)
  • Andover, MA (Toshiba laptops--parent purchase)

8
Current 11 laptop programs (2)
  • Michigan
  • Cross platforms
  • Looking into less expensive technology (i.e.
    Palms)
  • Sedgwick, KS (2002)
  • Apple iBooks in middle school
  • Texas
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Vermont

9
New Hampshire Question
  • Would the initial positive findings from Maines
    11 laptop program generalize to six New
    Hampshire middle schools?

Photo taken from http//www.state.nh.us/governor/
(1/28/04)
10
History of TPSE
Fastest roll out of a 11 technology program
ever!!!
11
History of TPSE (2)
Bensons Philosophy
  • "Technology must be heavily leveraged in a way
    to enhance the classroom experience and excite
    the student's passion for learning,
  • In a perfect world, this would mean each of
    the participating student would be excited each
    morning in anticipation of coming to school and
    no student would ever want to leave after school
    ends.

Source http//www.state.nh.us/governor/
12
History of TPSE (3)
11 laptops would
  • Improve educational teaching, learning and
    achievement
  • Use an interactive instructional practice
  • Bridge the significant digital divide
  • Create a highly educated, technology-savvy
    workforce

Source Benson PowerPoint 9/2/03
13
TPSE Timeline (3)
  • 9/2/03 Program announced
  • 10/15/03 Competitive material submitted
  • 10/03 24 private organizations donate over
    1.2 million to fund the program (no
    public funds)
  • 11/3/03 Participating schools announced
  • 12/03 Installation of technology
  • Teachers receive laptops
  • Teacher training
  • January 5-6, 2004
  • iBooks distributed to 7th grade students

14
Participants
  • 6 New Hampshire middle schools selected from
    approximately 20 applications
  • Armand R. Dupont School (Allenstown, NH)
  • Indian River Middle School (Canaan, NH)
  • Haverhill Cooperative Middle School (N.
    Haverhill, NH)
  • Paul School (Sanbornville, NH)
  • Thornton Central School (Thornton, NH)
  • Winnisquam Regional Middle School (Tilton, NH)

400 students 40 teachers
15
Program Characteristics
  • Apple iBook laptops for teachers and students
  • Software
  • Digital cameras and digital video cameras
  • Wireless school wide networks
  • Printers
  • Teacher training
  • Technology support

16
Study Design/Methodology
  • Try and capture the initial impact/effect of the
    the laptop program (Jan. 04)
  • Convince stakeholders that research and
    evaluation was an important component of the
    initiative
  • PRE/POST Design

Pre Survey Post Survey Follow Up Web Survey
Teacher Survey Jan. 04 May/June 04 Oct. 05
Student Survey Jan. 04 May/June 04 ---
17
Study Design/Methodology
  • Spring 2004 Student Surveys (n862 both pre and
    post)
  • Measures of technology use in school
  • Technology use at home
  • Across subject area
  • Personal comfort level with technology
  • Spring 2004 Teacher Surveys (n47 both pre and
    post)
  • Measures of technology use in school
  • Measures of technology use beyond the classroom
  • Across subject area
  • Personal comfort level with technology
  • Demographic Information
  • Attitude toward technology

18
Study Design/Methodology
  • Fall 2004 Teacher Survey Follow Up (n32)
  • Capture teachers perceptions about the specific
    impacts of the 11 program on students, teaching
    and learning
  • Collected Online
  • http//corvus.bc.edu/nhteacherfollowup/NH_teacher_
    followup.cfm
  • Survey items adapted from teacher survey measures
    created for use in Maine
  • Specific focus on how technology has impacted
    different groups of students
  • Traditional students
  • High Achieving Students
  • At-Risk or Low Achieving Students

19
Study Design/Methodology
  • No systematic examination of achievementyet
  • First need to measure impact and level of us
  • No shared assessment in NH at the 7th grade
  • Need previous measures of student achievement
  • Individual student data
  • Difficulty in getting comparison groups to
    participate
  • Teachers perception of technology impact on
    achievement

Todays presentation focuses on the immediate
(1st six months) impact of the laptop program
20
Student Level Results/Findings
Student survey response rate
Estimated of 7th grade Students Pre (1/04) Responses Post (5/04) Responses
Dupont 63 61 58
Haverhill 71 73 47
Indian River 118 100 96
Paul 80 64 61
Thornton 28 27 28
Winnisquam 175 114 134
21
Students used technology in school substantially
more across all six 11 settings
15 min or less
15 -60 min
Never
1-2 hrs
2 hrs
22
Students used technology in school substantially
more in English/Language Arts
23
Students used technology in school substantially
more in Social Studies
15 min or less
Never
2 hrs
15 -60 min
1-2 hrs
24
Students used technology in school substantially
more in Math
15 min or less
Never
2 hrs
15 -60 min
1-2 hrs
25
Students used technology in school substantially
more in Science
15 min or less
Never
2 hrs
15 -60 min
1-2 hrs
26
Students used technology for wide variety of tasks
15 min or less
15 -60 min
Never
1-2 hrs
2 hrs
27
Teachers use of technology as reported by the
students
15 min or less
15 -60 min
Never
1-2 hrs
2 hrs
R
28
Students use of technology at home
15 min or less
15 -60 min
Never
1-2 hrs
2 hrs
29
Students reported technology skills
Not Well
Very Well
30
Pre/Post SY (03/04) Teacher Results
Teacher survey response rate less sure than
student survey
Typically Math, Science, English/language Arts,
or Social Studies teachers completed the survey,
however around 10 of respondents were not
primary classroom teachers
31
Teacher Pre/Post Beliefs and Confidence Measures
1Very Important 2Somewhat Important 3Not
Very Important
1 Very Confident 2Somewhat Confident 3Not Very
Confident
32
Teachers Use of Technology
Once or twice a year
Several times per year
Several times per month
Several times per week
Never
R
33
How often do teachers assign students to create
the following products using technology?
Once or twice a year
Several times per year
Several times per month
Several times per week
Never
34
Also observed changes in teachers beliefs towards
learning and technology?
Overwhelming agreement among participating
teachers that
Students work harder when using computers
Technology allows students to create better
looking finished products
Students are more willing to write second drafts
when using a computer
Students develop a deeper understanding of the
material when using technology
Increase in the belief that students interact
with each other more while working with computers
35
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
32 teachers across the six schools responded to
an online follow up survey (n32 in all cases)
36
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
37
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
38
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
39
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
40
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
41
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
42
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
43
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
44
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
45
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
46
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
47
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
48
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
49
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
50
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
51
Teacher Survey Follow Ups (Oct. 04)
52
The Rise and Fall of 11 Computing
  • The cost of going 11 is great
  • 40 million in Maine,
  • 1.2 million in NH
  • Over 25 million in VA
  • There is a climate of great pressure on schools
    to demonstrate that money spent is directly and
    positively impacting students
  • Current definition of impacting students is
    increased performance as measured by a
    standardized test (accountability at all levels,
    AYP, etc)

53
The Rise and Fall of 11 Computing (2)
It is estimated that the measurable impact of
educational technology investments can take 4
years Stakeholders expect to see measurable
differences in student scores given their
investments (typically not very patient)
54
Rise and Fall of 11 Computing
Research/Evaluation is costly (time and
money) Methodological Challenges Good accurate
measures of technology use (STEP 1) Valid
measurement of student achievement Issues with
paper based tests for high-tech
students (Russell, 1999 2001 2002) Measures
of prior achievement IDEAL QUESTION What kind
of technology use leads to what kind of
achievement gains (for x kind of student)?
55
Laptop flop Maine results should give pause to
NH MAINE'S two-year-old experiment with laptop
computers in the classroom has flopped as
measured by student test scores. Now maybe this
nonsensical trend will fizzle out and we can get
back to spending time and money on educating
students instead of buying them expensive tools
that don't help them learn the basics. Maine has
laid out 37.2 million on a four-year experiment
that provides laptop computers to all students in
grades 7 and 8
Manchester Union Leader August 12, 2004 Page A16
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