Abstract%20Writing%20Workshop - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Abstract%20Writing%20Workshop

Description:

Some conferences ask for abstracts first. Workshops / poster ... Some conferences / workshops ask for 1-2 page abstracts first, and then full papers later ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:45
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 21
Provided by: jason203
Learn more at: http://www.cs.cmu.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Abstract%20Writing%20Workshop


1
Abstract Writing Workshop
Grady Gauthier Jason I. Hong EECS
Department University of California at Berkeley
2
Getting Your Research Out There
  • Posters
  • Workshops
  • Short papers
  • Tech reports
  • Conference papers
  • Journal articles
  • Web Sites and Web-Based Databases

3
What are Research Abstracts?
  • Abstracts are stand-alone summaries of a research
    project, giving an overview of the problem, what
    you did, what you learned
  • Abstracts are important because
  • Some conferences ask for abstracts first
  • Workshops / poster sessions ask for abstracts
  • They are the first thing people read in a paper
  • They are used in collections of papers
  • They are used in searchable databases
  • Is this research interesting to me?

4
Workshop Format
  • How to write abstracts
  • How to get your research out there
  • (And a little bit about how research is done)

5
(No Transcript)
6
Example Abstract
  • Through a study of web site design practice, we
    observed that web site designers design sites at
    different levels of refinementsite map,
    storyboard, and individual pageand that
    designers sketch at all levels during the early
    stages of design. However, existing web design
    tools do not support these tasks very well.
    Informed by these observations, we created DENIM,
    a system that helps web site designers in the
    early stages of design. DENIM supports sketching
    input, allows design at different refinement
    levels, and unifies the levels through zooming.
    We performed an informal evaluation with seven
    professional designers and found that they
    reacted positively to the concept and were
    interested in using such a system in their work.
  • (CHI2000)

7
Example Abstract
  • Through a study of web site design practice, we
    observed that web site designers design sites at
    different levels of refinementsite map,
    storyboard, and individual pageand that
    designers sketch at all levels during the early
    stages of design. However, existing web design
    tools do not support these tasks very well.
    Informed by these observations, we created DENIM,
    a system that helps web site designers in the
    early stages of design. DENIM supports sketching
    input, allows design at different refinement
    levels, and unifies the levels through zooming.
    We performed an informal evaluation with seven
    professional designers and found that they
    reacted positively to the concept and were
    interested in using such a system in their work.
  • (CHI2000)

8
What are Research Abstracts?
  • Abstracts should have
  • Objective the problem
  • Methods how you approached the problem
  • Results interesting results, the facts
  • Conclusions what we think the results mean

9
Example Abstract
  • Caspase 8 is a cysteine protease regulated in
    both a death-receptor-dependent and independent
    manner during apoptosis. Here, we report that the
    gene for caspase 8 is frequently inactivated in
    neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor of the
    peripheral nervous system. The gene is silenced
    through DNA methylation as well as through gene
    deletion. Complete inactivation of CASP8 occurred
    almost exclusively in neuroblastomas with
    amplification of the oncogene MYCN. Caspase
    8-null neuroblastoma cells were resistant to
    death receptor- and doxorubicin-mediated
    apoptosis, deficits that were corrected by
    programmed expression of the enzyme. Thus,
    caspase 8 acts as a tumor suppressor in
    neuroblastomas with amplification of MYCN.
  • (Nature, May 2000)

10
Example Abstract
  • Caspase 8 is a cysteine protease regulated in
    both a death-receptor-dependent and independent
    manner during apoptosis. Here, we report that the
    gene for caspase 8 is frequently inactivated in
    neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor of the
    peripheral nervous system. The gene is silenced
    through DNA methylation as well as through gene
    deletion. Complete inactivation of CASP8 occurred
    almost exclusively in neuroblastomas with
    amplification of the oncogene MYCN. Caspase
    8-null neuroblastoma cells were resistant to
    death receptor- and doxorubicin-mediated
    apoptosis, deficits that were corrected by
    programmed expression of the enzyme. Thus,
    caspase 8 acts as a tumor suppressor in
    neuroblastomas with amplification of MYCN.
  • (Nature, May 2000)

11
Structure of Research Papers
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Background and Related Work
  • Description of Your Work
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Future Work
  • Conclusion

12
Structure of Research Papers
  • Both present an overview of the research
  • Abstracts versus Introductions
  • Introduction is longer
  • Abstract describes specific problem, intro needs
    to have a stronger, broader problem motivation
  • Introduction provides some background info,
    describing the research area
  • Abstracts should not have
  • References
  • Background info
  • Information that is not in the paper itself

13
Abstract Lengths
  • Length of abstracts vary
  • 1 paragraph (4-7 sentences) for posters, tech
    reports, short papers, conference papers
  • Some have strict word lengths, many do not
  • 1-2 paragraphs for journal articles
  • Some conferences / workshops ask for 1-2 page
    abstracts first, and then full papers later
  • These kinds of abstract are different, as they
    explain what you want to do, why it's an
    important problem, and any early results

14
Writing Research Abstracts
  • Typically written after rest of paper is done
  • Writing Tips
  • Skim thru paper for the main points, including
    objectives, methods, results, and conclusions
  • Remove any background info
  • Remove info that is not in the paper itself
  • Iterate
  • Goals
  • Make sure the abstract can be read by itself
    without the paper (People often read abstract,
    intro, and conclusions first, rest of paper last)
  • Clear for your specific audience

15
Example Abstract
  • Algorithmic Issues in Large Scale Dynamic
    Networks
  • We propose to develop a theoretically
    well-founded framework for the design and
    analysis of algorithms for large scale dynamic
    networks. In particular, for the Web and related
    dynamic networks, such as the underlying Internet
    topology and Internet-based peer to peer ad hoc
    networks. We plan to develop rigorous
    mathematical models that capture key
    characteristics and can make reliable predictions
    about features such as connectivity, information
    content, and dynamic of these networks. We plan
    to apply this framework to test existing
    algorithms and construct improved new algorithms.
  • The main benefits of developing the mathematical
    models of the Web structure and dynamics will be
    the improved theoretical foundation for the
    design, analysis, and testing of algorithms that
    operate in the web environment. The tangible
    results of this work will therefore be models
    that can be subjected to experimental
    verification, analyses of algorithms based upon
    these models, new
  • algorithms that benefit from these analyses, and,
    finally, proof-of-concept demonstrations and
    experimental evaluations of such
    algorithms. (NSF ITR 2001)

16
Exercise
  • 15 minute exercise
  • Get in groups of 2-3
  • Write a 1 paragraph abstract on research you are
    doing now (or a class project you are working on
    now or did in the past)
  • Do either the "This is what I did" abstract or
    the "This is what I will do" abstract
  • After you are done, pass your abstract to others
    in your group and get feedback

17
Example Abstract
  • Software support for making effective pen-based
    applications is currently rudimentary. To
    facilitate the creation of such applications, we
    have developed SATIN, a Java-based toolkit
    designed to support the creation of applications
    that leverage the informal nature of pens. This
    support includes a scenegraph for manipulating
    and rendering objects support for zooming and
    rotating objects, switching between multiple
    views of an object, integration of pen input with
    interpreters, libraries for manipulating ink
    strokes, widgets optimized for pens, and
    compatibility with Javas Swing toolkit. SATIN
    includes a generalized architecture for handling
    pen input, consisting of recognizers,
    interpreters, and multi-interpreters. In this
    paper, we describe the functionality and
    architecture of SATIN, using two applications
    built with SATIN as examples.
  • (UIST2000)

18
Example Abstract
  • Software support for making effective pen-based
    applications is currently rudimentary. To
    facilitate the creation of such applications, we
    have developed SATIN, a toolkit designed to
    support the creation of applications that
    leverage the informal nature of pens. SATIN
    introduces a generalized architecture for
    handling pen input, consisting of recognizers,
    interpreters, and multi-interpreters. It also
    includes libraries for manipulating ink strokes,
    GUI widgets optimized for pens, and compatibility
    with Javas Swing toolkit. In this paper, we
    describe the functionality and architecture of
    SATIN, using two applications built with SATIN as
    examples.

19
  • Questions?

20
Example Abstract
  • Software support for making effective pen-based
    applications is currently rudimentary. To
    facilitate the creation of such applications, we
    have developed SATIN, a Java-based toolkit
    designed to support the creation of applications
    that leverage the informal nature of pens. This
    support includes a scenegraph for manipulating
    and rendering objects support for zooming and
    rotating objects, switching between multiple
    views of an object, integration of pen input with
    interpreters, libraries for manipulating ink
    strokes, widgets optimized for pens, and
    compatibility with Javas Swing toolkit. SATIN
    includes a generalized architecture for handling
    pen input, consisting of recognizers,
    interpreters, and multi-interpreters. In this
    paper, we describe the functionality and
    architecture of SATIN, using two applications
    built with SATIN as examples.
  • (UIST2000)
About PowerShow.com