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Improving High Schools Performance Goals and Characteristics of High-performing High Schools

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Title: Improving High Schools Performance Goals and Characteristics of High-performing High Schools


1
Improving High Schools Performance Goals and
Characteristics of High-performing High Schools
2
High-performing High Schools Are About
  • Rigor/Focus
  • Relevance/Engaging Assignments
  • Relationships/Support
  • Improved Transitions
  • Leadership

3
1. High-performing SchoolsHave Functional High
School Performance Goals
  • High school graduates are ready for postsecondary
    studies and a career college and career
    readiness
  • 90 of students entering grade nine graduate four
    years later with a real diploma high school
    graduation
  • Entering ninth-graders are performing at the
    basic level and above in reading, mathematics and
    science on NAEP-like exams middle to high
    school transition

4
College and Career ReadinessACT Gains in SREB
States 1994-2004
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
5
College and Career Readiness
Percent of Public High Schools With Students
Taking Advanced Placement Exams 2003
Fewer than 60
60 to 74
75 or more
United States 66 SREB 78 Louisiana 22
Source The College Board
6
College and Career Readiness
AP Exams per 1,000 Juniors and Seniors 2003
Includes students at public and private schools
Source The College Board
7
College and Career Readiness Louisiana
Percent of Career/Technical Students Scoring At
or Above the Basic Level on the High Schools
That Work Reading Assessment by Completion of
English Curriculum, 2004
Source Special Analyses of 2004 High Schools
That Work Assessment Data
8
College and Career Readiness Louisiana
Percent of Career/Technical Students Scoring At
or Above the Basic Level on the High Schools
That Work Mathematics Assessment by Completion of
Mathematics Curriculum, 2004
Source Special Analyses of 2004 High Schools
That Work Assessment Data
9
College and Career Readiness Louisiana
Percent of Career/Technical Students Scoring At
or Above the Basic Level on the High Schools
That Work Science Assessment by Completion of
Science Curriculum, 2004
Source Special Analyses of 2004 High Schools
That Work Assessment Data
10
High School GraduationPercentage of Ninth
Graders Who Do Not Graduate - 1990 and 2001 for
SREB States
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
11
High School Graduation Comparison of Two
Different Methods
SREB States
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
12
High School Graduation Ninth Grade Bulge in
SREB States 1990-2000
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
13
High School GraduationPercentage of 12th-Grade
Enrollment and Diplomas Awarded in Spring/Summer
1996 2001
Louisiana 87 91
Highest SREB state -- MD 97 97
Lowest SREB state -- SC 87 87
14
High School Graduation9th-Grade and 8th- Grade
Bulge in Louisiana
9th- Grade Bulge 8th-Grade Bulge
1998 115 92
2002 95 104
Drop by20 Increase by 12
15
High School Graduation Number of Low-promotion
Schools
State State
Texas (243) Mississippi (60)
Florida (163) Kentucky (39)
Georgia (156) Virginia (26)
North Carolina (107) Maryland (17)
South Carolina (100) Oklahoma (15)
Louisiana (73) Delaware (8)
Alabama (71) West Virginia (6)
Tennessee (63) Arkansas (5)
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
16
75 High- and Low-performing Schools with
Comparative Students
High Sites Low Sites
African-American 28 27
White 57 59
Other 15 14
Parent-No college 35 37
17
2. High Performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Completing Recommended Academic Core
Rigor
  • Four credits in college-prep/honors English
  • Four mathematics credits Algebra I, geometry,
    Algebra II and above
  • Three science credits at the college-prep level
    four credits with a block schedule
  • Three years of social studies
  • Mathematics in the senior year

18
High-performing SchoolsComparison of High- and
Low-performing Schools by Recommended Curriculum
Areas Rigor
19
3. High-performing SchoolsStudents Complete a
Concentration Focus
  • Mathematics and science concentration four
    credits in each field, with at least one at the
    Advanced Placement level
  • Humanities concentration four credits each in
    college-prep-level language arts and social
    studies, with at least one at the Advanced
    Placement level and four additional credits from
    foreign language, fine arts, journalism, debate,
    etc.
  • Career/technical concentration four credits in
    a planned sequence of courses within a broad
    career field pre-engineering, health/medical
    science, etc.

20
High-performing SchoolsCompletion of
Concentrations at High- and Low-performing
Schools Focus
21
4. High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Experience High Expectations
Specific Practices High Low
State amount and quality of work for an A or a B (often) 53 41
Teachers availability for extra help (frequently) 67 53
One or more hours of homework (daily) 32 20
Revise written work (often) 44 32
Work hard to meet high standards (often) 52 40
22
5. High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Literacy Experiences
Engaging Instruction
Literacy practices High Low
Revise written work for quality (often) 44 32
Write in-depth explanations (sometimes/often) 63 51
Complete short writings in English (monthly) 82 68
in science (monthly) 38 28
in social studies (monthly) 50 38

23
High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Literacy Experiences
Engaging Instruction
Literacy practices High Low
Use word processor (often) 60 43
Discuss topics with other students (monthly) 58 44
Read books outside of class (monthly) 48 31
Read technical materials in class (monthly) 48 37
Read non-school materials outside of school (two hours weekly) 23 20

24
6. High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Numeracy Experiences
Relevance/Engaging
Numeracy Practices High Low
4 courses, Algebra I and higher 63 41
Mathematics the senior year 79 73
4 or more mathematics courses 77 65

25
High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Numeracy Experiences
Relevance/Engaging
Numeracy Practices High Low
Teachers link mathematics to real-life problems (sometimes) 75 67
Work-related mathematics problems (monthly) 35 27
Use of mathematics in career/technical assignments (monthly) 52 41
Solve problems outside textbook (monthly) 74 59
26
High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Numeracy Experiences
Relevance/Engaging
Numeracy Practices High Low
Orally explain processes. (monthly) 36 27
Work with others on assignments. (monthly) 54 38
Groups brainstorm to solve problems. (monthly) 63 46
Solve open-ended problems. (monthly) 76 61
Use graphing calculator. (weekly) 67 50
27
7. High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Science Experiences
Relevance/Engaging
High Low
Completed at least 3 of the following CP physical science, CP biology, Biology II, anatomy, CP chemistry, Physics, AP science 50 23
Took science the senior year 70 57
Take 4 or more science courses 58 36
28
High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Science Experiences
Relevance/Engaging
High Low
Use science equipment to do science activities (weekly) 39 26
Use science equipment to do science activities in the classroom (monthly) 77 63
Shown how scientific concepts are used in real-life situations (often) 39 28
29
High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Science Experiences
Relevance/Engaging
High Low
Worked with one or more students in class on science work (monthly) 74 58
Prepared a written report on science project (monthly) 55 42
Read an assigned book or article dealing with science (monthly) 46 35
30
8. High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage
Have Intensive Extra Help Relevance/Relationship
High Low
Can get extra help from teachers when needed (often) 48 36
Teachers available (frequently) 67 53
Helps me to understand material (often) 49 39
Extra help often helps to get a better grade 44 33
31
High-performing SchoolsExtra-help Strategies
Support/Relationship
  • Offer before/after school teacher-led extra-help
    sessions
  • Tutorial classes during the school day
  • Peer tutoring
  • Computer-based instruction
  • Immediate retake opportunities for failed courses
    after school, summer Web-based instruction.

32
9. High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Guidance Experiences
Focus/Support/Relationship
Guidance Practices High Low
Planned program by end of grade 9 53 47
Talked with parents about high school plans (semester) 72 62
Spoke with someone in an aspired career field 73 62
33
High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Students Have Intensive Guidance Experiences
Focus/Support/Relationship
Guidance Practices High Low
Talked with teachers about plans after high school 85 78
Annual meeting to review program of study 71 62
Assigned adult adviser for all 4 years 44 38
Talked to college representative 87 79
Parents and I received information and assistance for college 70 57
34
10. High-performing Schools Higher Percentage
of Students See Importance of High School
Relevance/Focus/Relationship/Rigor
High Low
Courses are exciting and challenging (often) 23 15
I tried to do my best (often) 61 52
Failed to turn in assignment (sometimes/often) 26 32
Teacher encouraged me to do well (often) 58 45
Teachers would not let me get by without doing the work (often) 36 27
35
High-performing Schools Higher Percentage of
Students See Importance of High School
Relevance/Focus/Relationship/Rigor
High Low
It is very important to get good grades 77 68
It is very important to participate in class 66 57
It is very important to attend all classes 85 79
It is very important to take college-preparatory classes 54 46
36
11. High-performing SchoolsProvide More
Students Access to High-quality Career/Technical
Studies Relevance
  • Industry-certified teachers and programs
  • Students working for college credit and/or
    employer certification exam
  • Active advisory committees
  • Access to off-campus career/technical courses
    Web-based, etc.
  • Offer youth apprenticeship opportunities
  • Integrate academic studies

37
12. High-performing SchoolsHave Developed
Middle Grades to Ninth Grade Transition Program
Transition
  • Getting students ready for CP English a ninth
    grade catch up course
  • Getting students ready for real Algebra a ninth
    grade catch-up course
  • Summer Program
  • Curriculum alignment with middle grades schools
  • Orientation of students and parents to the
    demands of high school

38
13. High-performing SchoolsHave Developed a
High School to College and Career Transition
Program Transition
  • Use the senior year to
  • Allow students who are ready to earn college
    credit
  • Get unprepared students ready for college
  • Prepare those not planning for college to earn a
    certificate or pass an employer certification
    exam
  • Save the seniors

39
14. High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage
of Teachers Report Intensive School Improvement
Efforts LeadershipDestrehan High School, LA
Continuous Improvement Practices Continuous Improvement Practices
Goals are clear. 65
Teachers maintain a demanding and supportive environment. 63
Principals meet with teachers toexamine student work. (monthly) 69
40
High-performing SchoolsHigher Percentage of
Teachers Report Intensive School Improvement
Efforts -- LeadershipDestrehan High School, LA
Continuous Improvement Practices
Teachers continue to learn and seek out new ideas 78
Teachers/administrators work as a team 55
Teachers use data to evaluate school and classroom practices 93
41
High-performing Schools
  • What can states do to increase graduation rates
    and achievement?

42
High-performing Schools
  1. Hold schools accountable to increase annually the
    percentage of graduates completing the
    recommended academic core and who complete a
    mathematics and science, humanities or career
    concentration.
  2. Require schools to have an effective transition
    program from middle grades to high school.

43
High-performing Schools
  • 3. Require schools to develop an extra-help
    system aimed to assist students to recover when
    they fail a grade or a course and to pass
    high-stakes exams.

44
High-performing Schools
  • 4. Require that every student develop a five-year
    program of study that covers four years of high
    school and one year beyond.

45
High-performing Schools
  • 5. Provide students access to quality
    career/technical studies in high-demand,
    high-paying career fields.

46
High-performing Schools
  • 6. Require every high school teacher academic,
    technical, fine arts and other to be trained in
    how to use content-literacy skills and study
    skills to help students become independent
    learners in the teachers subject matter.

47
High-performing Schools
  • 7. Require every high school to develop a
    formalized initiative for the transition from
    high school to college and careers.

48
High-performing Schools
  1. Expand the use of technology in high school to
    improve achievement in core academic courses to
    help students recover when they fail a course and
    to meet standards on exit exams.

49
High School Graduation
  • 9. Examine state policies and their impact on
    improving graduation rates.

50
High School Graduation
  • Does allowing 16 and 17 year-old students to take
    the GED encourage dropping out?

51
High School Graduation
Facts to Consider
  • Less than one in five 16 and 17 year-olds who
    drop out get a high school equivalency.
  • GED recipients with no additional education earn
    only 1 more than dropouts.
  • 12 of male GED holders complete one year of
    college 2 four years of college 3 an
    associates degree 18 on-the-job training.
  • Allowing teenagers to leave school for a GED
    lowers completion rates by 5.

52
High School Graduation
Drivers Licenses and High School Completion Rates
  • Does linking drivers licenses to school
    attendance work?

53
High School Graduation
Drivers Licenses and Student Dropout Rates
West Virginia West Virginia West Virginia
Year Student Licenses Suspended Dropout Rate (1)
1999 856 3.4
2000 733 2.9
2001 791 2.5
2002 570 2.5
2003 490 NA
(1) Dropout rate is calculated by dividing the number of dropouts for the year by the second months enrollment grade nine to 12. Source West Virginias Department of Education (1) Dropout rate is calculated by dividing the number of dropouts for the year by the second months enrollment grade nine to 12. Source West Virginias Department of Education (1) Dropout rate is calculated by dividing the number of dropouts for the year by the second months enrollment grade nine to 12. Source West Virginias Department of Education
54
High School Graduation
Drivers Licenses and Student Dropout Rates
North Carolina North Carolina North Carolina
Year Student Licenses Suspended Dropout Rate (1)
1998 2,558 6.78
1999 5,255 6.43
2000 5,845 5.72
2001 6,327 5.25
(1) Dropout rate is calculated by dividing the number of dropouts for the year by the average enrollment of the current year grade nine to 12 and previous year.Source NC Department of Public Instruction Web site. (1) Dropout rate is calculated by dividing the number of dropouts for the year by the average enrollment of the current year grade nine to 12 and previous year.Source NC Department of Public Instruction Web site. (1) Dropout rate is calculated by dividing the number of dropouts for the year by the average enrollment of the current year grade nine to 12 and previous year.Source NC Department of Public Instruction Web site.
55
High School Graduation
Examine State Policies and Their Impact on
Improving Graduation Rates
  • Do we need to adopt flexibility in our assessment
    for high school graduation?
  • Giving students easy access to retaking exam
  • Using national employer certification as a way to
    demonstrate performance and

56
Examine State Policies and Their Impact on
Improving Graduation Rates
  • Does your state accountability policy give equal
    emphasis to raising achievement and holding
    students in school?

57
10. Develop a special emphasis on the
lowest-performing high schools?
  • Require schools to adopt a research-based
    school improvement design.
  • High Schools That Work
  • Talent Development
  • First Things First

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
58
High School Graduation Improvement at
Low-performing Schools Adapting HSTW with a
Comprehensive School Reform Grant
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
All gains are significant at the .01
level. Source 2004 HSTW Assessment Data
59
Develop a special emphasis on the
lowest-performing high schools.
  • Organize large, impersonal schools into Small
    Learning Communities.

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
60
Create a state leadership academy focused on
developing a TEAM of district and school leaders.
Develop a special emphasis on the
lowest-performing high schools.
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
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