Using the CIDOC CRM: RLG - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Using the CIDOC CRM: RLG PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 79cb4-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Using the CIDOC CRM: RLG

Description:

Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine. Indiana University, Bloomington ... AMICO Data Dictionary. CDWA. CIDOC RM & CRM. CIMI DTD & Profile ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:44
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 37
Provided by: tony47
Learn more at: http://www.chin.gc.ca
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Using the CIDOC CRM: RLG


1
Using the CIDOC CRMRLGs Cultural Materials
Initiative
  • Tony Gill
  • Research Libraries Group, Inc.

2
Overview
  • 1. Brief introduction to RLG
  • 2. RLGs Cultural Materials Alliance
  • 3. CMA and the CIDOC CRM
  • 4. Our experiences with the CRM

3
  • 1. Brief introduction to RLG
  • 2. RLGs Cultural Materials Alliance
  • 3. CMA and the CIDOC CRM
  • 4. Our experiences with the CRM

4
RLG in brief
  • Research Libraries Group, Inc. (RLG) is a
    non-profit corporation founded in 1974
  • 160 members in 12 countries
  • World HQ in Mountain View, California
  • UK agent Nancy Elkington based in London
  • Networked information services
  • Online access to gt100 million items
  • Collaboration
  • Member Programs Initiatives

5
RLGs mission
  • Through collaborative action, improve access
    to information that supports research and
    learning

6
  • 1. Brief introduction to RLG
  • 2. RLGs Cultural Materials Alliance
  • 3. CMA and the CIDOC CRM
  • 4. Our experiences with the CRM

7
The problem space...
  • World-class collections of cultural materials
    held by RLG member institutions
  • Primary, often unique works and artifacts that
    document shared global culture
  • Increasingly used to support research and
    learning by RLG members and their clients
  • Traditionally found in the collections of
    museums, library special collections, archives
    historical societies
  • E.g. illuminated medieval manuscripts, Soviet
    political posters, Charlie Chaplin movies, oral
    histories, lunar landers

8
  • stuff really is important. Scholars use it to
    separate fact from fiction and to interpret the
    human record.
  • John W. HaegerRLG Vice President EmeritusRLG
    News Issue 49, Fall 1999

9
The problem space
  • Providing access to collections is central to the
    mission of most memory institutions
  • Access to physical collections constrained by
    physical factors (space, location, resources,
    preservation etc.)
  • Increasing demand for access to digital
    collections for
  • Research, teaching, personal use, commercial use
  • Access to digital collections constrained by
    factors such as fragmented access, lack of
    consensus on standards, rapid technological
    change etc.

10
The problem space
  • Complex issues in delivering coherent, integrated
    access to digital collections
  • Diverse descriptive practices
  • Meaningful integration across collections
  • Digital representation of materials
    (surrogates)
  • Reliable, distributed infrastructure
  • Institutional rights and responsibilities
  • Ongoing content development

11
  • We believe that the best and perhaps the only
    way to accomplish these goals is through a
    focused and sustained collaboration with selected
    museums, historical societies, and industry
    partners. Research universities share with
    museums and historical societies a common and
    fundamental commitment to building great
    collectionsand to advancing learning and
    scholarship through the study and interpretation
    of these collections.
  • Max MarmorYale University Art Libraryhttp//www.
    library.edu/art/about.htmlNovember 1999

12
Cultural Materials Initiative - goals
  • Develop a solution to address user demands,
    institutional needs and complex issues that is
  • Collaborative
  • Multi-institutional
  • International
  • Standards-based
  • Sustainable

13
Cultural Materials Alliance
  • An Alliance of RLG members committed to
  • Providing integrated access to cultural content
    through the development of a collective digital
    resource
  • Enhancing the value of content through rich
    cross-collection links
  • Establishing appropriate rights management
    framework
  • Developing powerful, user-friendly web-based
    discovery and retrieval tools
  • Identifying and promoting best practice
  • Developing sustainable business models that will
    support long-term development of the service

14
Alliance members (1 of 2)
  • American Antiquarian Society
  • Bayerische Staatsbibliothek
  • British Library
  • Brooklyn Museum of Art
  • Chicago Historical Society
  • Columbia University
  • Cornell University
  • Duke University
  • Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of
    Religion
  • Huntington Library, Art Collections, and
    Botanical Gardens
  • Imperial College of Science, Technology, and
    Medicine
  • Indiana University, Bloomington
  • International Institute of Social History
  • Library of Congress
  • Linda Hall Library
  • London School of Economics
  • National Library of Australia
  • National Library of Scotland
  • National Library of Wales
  • Natural History Museum

15
Alliance members (2 of 2)
  • New York State Archives and Records
    Administration
  • Pennsylvania State University
  • Smithsonian Institution
  • State Historical Society of Wisconsin
  • Syracuse University
  • Temple University
  • Trinity College Dublin
  • University of California, Berkeley
  • University of Cambridge
  • University of Edinburgh
  • University of Florida
  • University of Glasgow
  • University of London Library
  • University of Minnesota
  • University of Oxford
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • Yale University
  • 39 members at 23 August 2000
  • http//www.rlg.org/culturalres/allies.html

16
Content characteristics
  • Digital representations or surrogates of
    cultural materials, e.g.
  • Images
  • Audio files
  • Video clips
  • Animations
  • 3-D models
  • Supporting/contextual materials
  • Structured textual descriptions...

17
  • 1. Brief introduction to RLG
  • 2. RLGs Cultural Materials Alliance
  • 3. CMA and the CIDOC CRM
  • 4. Our experiences with the CRM

18
Different (descriptive) strokes...
  • Different curatorial approaches
  • Museums
  • Libraries
  • Archives
  • Visual Resources
  • Historical Societies
  • Different subject disciplines
  • Arts humanities
  • Natural sciences
  • Social sciences etc...

19
Different (descriptive) strokes...
  • Different levels of granularity
  • Collection level
  • Group level
  • Item level
  • Different levels of detail
  • Simple inventory
  • Collections management documentation
  • Authority reference files
  • Associated contextual research materials

20
Different (descriptive) strokes...
  • Different data structures
  • Flatfile
  • Hierarchical
  • Tagged text
  • Relational
  • Object-oriented
  • Different data value standards
  • AAT, ULAN, TGN
  • LCSH, NAF, DDC, UDC
  • MeSH, SHIC etc...

21
Descriptive standards
  • AMICO Data Dictionary
  • CDWA
  • CIDOC RM CRM
  • CIMI DTD Profile
  • Dublin Core
  • EAD
  • MARC
  • MESL
  • Object ID
  • SPECTRUM
  • VRA Core Categories
  • Other, superceded descriptive standards...

22
Descriptive standards
  • AMICO Data Dictionary
  • CDWA
  • CIDOC RM CRM
  • CIMI DTD Profile
  • Dublin Core
  • EAD
  • MARC
  • MESL
  • Object ID
  • SPECTRUM
  • VRA Core Categories
  • Other, superceded descriptive standards
  • 1,001 home cooked flavours...

23
CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model
  • Based on ICOM/CIDOC International Guidelines for
    Museum Object Information The CIDOC Information
    Categories
  • Object-oriented domain ontology
  • Formalises the semantics needed to describe
    objects and relationships in the cultural
    heritage context
  • Mappings to existing standards
  • ISO reviewing for possible publication

24
Benefits of CRM
  • Elegant and simple compared to comparable
    Entity-Relation model
  • Coherently integrates information at varying
    degrees of detail
  • Readily extensible through O-O class typing and
    specializations
  • Richer semantic content allows inferences to be
    made from fuzzy data
  • Designed for mediation of heterogeneous cultural
    heritage information...

25
  • The primary role of the CRM is to serve as a
    basis for mediation of cultural heritage
    information and thereby provide the semantic
    'glue' needed to transform today's disparate,
    localised information sources into a coherent and
    valuable global resource.
  • Nick Croftshttp//www.ville-ge.ch/musinfo/cidoc/o
    omodel/

26
CIDOC CRM Overview
  • 62 classes
  • Classes have properties, which are often links to
    other classes
  • Classes inherit properties from their parents or
    superclasses
  • Classes have some similarities with relational
    tables
  • CIDOC Entity
  • Temporal entity
  • Physical entity
  • Conceptual object
  • Actor
  • Appellation
  • Contact point
  • Place
  • Dimension
  • Type
  • Primitive value

27
User access points
  • Keyword search
  • Who
  • What
  • When
  • Where
  • How
  • CIDOC Entity
  • Temporal entity
  • Physical entity
  • Conceptual object
  • Actor
  • Appellation
  • Contact point
  • Place
  • Dimension
  • Type
  • Primitive value

28
  • 1. Brief introduction to RLG
  • 2. RLGs Cultural Materials Alliance
  • 3. CMA and the CIDOC CRM
  • 4. Our experiences with the CRM

29
CRM learning curve
  • Model necessarily complex in order to model the
    broad domain of cultural heritage information
  • O-O modeling paradigm unfamiliar compared to
    entity-relation modeling
  • Just similar enough to be confusing!
  • Notation problems
  • Difficult to express mappings textually
  • UML Universal Modeling Language

30
Object production information
31
CRM learning curve
  • Mappings entail deconstruction of original
    records
  • Artifact-centric nature of descriptions discarded
  • Implicit entities made explicit in mapping
    process
  • SPECTRUM mapping
  • Dublin Core mapping
  • Others to follow...

32
CRM learning curve
  • Implementation details
  • O-O models can be implemented with relational
    database systems relatively easily
  • Initially hard to avoid thinking about physical
    database implementations when working with the
    model...
  • But (initially at least) this is confusing and
    unhelpful!

33
User access
  • Bias towards collections management information
    (as opposed to information for access and
    research) inherited from CIDOC Information
    Categories
  • RLG developing use cases for typical user
    access based on
  • NMS Catechism report
  • Getty Points of View workshop report
  • CIMI access points in Janney Sledge, A User
    Model for CIMI Z39.50 Application Profile, CIMI
    1995http//www.cimi.org/documents/Z3950_app_profi
    le_0995.html

34
User access example
  • A search for an actor should yield descriptions
    of
  • Artifacts for which the actor is the creator
    (general or specific role)
  • Artifacts for which the actor is the owner (past
    or present)
  • Artifacts in which the actor is depicted
  • Artifacts for which the actor is the user (past
    or present)
  • Biographical information about the actor

35
Further developments
  • RLG attended June 2000 stakeholders meeting in
    Aghios Pavlos, Crete
  • CRM needs further refinement, particularly to
    enhance support for research access
  • Needs more introductory outreach material
  • RLG enthusiastic about
  • Raising awareness of the model
  • Soliciting feedback from the community
  • Testing and validating with real data and real
    users to help finalize the model

36
RLG the CRM
  • RLG believes the model holds great promise as a
    tool for mediating between heterogeneous cultural
    descriptions
  • More information
  • Touring the RLG Information Landscape the CIDOC
    Conceptual Reference ModelRLG Focus 45, August
    2000http//www.rlg.org/r-focus/i45tour.html

37
www.rlg.org
About PowerShow.com