Delaware Positive Behavior Support Targeted Training July 31st and August 1st, 2006 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Delaware Positive Behavior Support Targeted Training July 31st and August 1st, 2006 PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 784f0-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Delaware Positive Behavior Support Targeted Training July 31st and August 1st, 2006

Description:

Gravois and Rosenfield and Gickling, IC Lab. Emphasis on Prevention. Primary - Schoolwide ... YELLOW Targeted vs. RED Intensive Intervention. Targeted ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:24
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 125
Provided by: kle961
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Delaware Positive Behavior Support Targeted Training July 31st and August 1st, 2006


1
DelawarePositive Behavior SupportTargeted
TrainingJuly 31st and August 1st, 2006
  • Developed in part with material from Illinois
    PBIS Network

2
Training Objectives
  • Understand how to use School-wide data for
    determining targeted support needs
  • Identify the steps for creating targeted
    individual student support systems
  • Practice using data to develop targeted
    intervention plans
  • Define team process
  • Identify data collection plan for determining the
    effectiveness of targeted interventions

3
Designing School-Wide Support Systems for
Student Success
1-5
5-10
80-90
4
Similarities Across all Three Levels
  • Team-based decision-making
  • Consensus around proactive strategies
  • Ownership by those closest to kids practical,
    real
  • Use real data to guide interventions
  • Translate teacher/family/student stories into
    data
  • Who, what, when, why
  • Whats it going to take to get improvement we
    want?

5
What is the to most influential enabler of
Individual PBS?
  • Teachers and other school personnel are
    adequately trained in individualized PBS
  • School personnel value all students
  • Building level administrators provide leadership
    in promoting PBS values and practices to the
    school community
  • School has building-wide behavior management
    system (e.g. SW PBS)
  • Adequate time is scheduled during the school day
    for school personnel to meet and plan with others

6
Survey Says
  • School has building-wide behavior management
    system (e.g. SW PBS)
  • On a 4-point Likert scale indicating level of
    impact from not much/not at all to substantial
    this item was rated highest with a 3.58 Mean
    score

7
School-wide Positive Behavior Support A
philosophy/climate that promotes positive
behavior to support student learning in the
classroom.
Instructional Support Team A vehicle through
which teachers may request assistance to address
individual academic and/or behavioral concerns.
Intensive Individual Supports
8
Summary of PBS BIG IDEAS
  • 1. Systems (How things are done)
  • Team based problem solving
  • Data-based decision making
  • Long term sustainability
  • 2. Data (How decisions are made)
  • On going data collection use
  • ODRs ( per day per month, location, behavior,
    student)
  • Suspension/expulsion, attendance, tardies
  • 3. Practices (How staff interact with students)
  • Direct teaching of behavioral expectations
  • On-going reinforcement of expected behaviors
  • Functional behavioral assessment

9
Instructional Support Team Big Ideas
  • Collaborative Communication Skills
  • Systematic Problem-Solving Process
  • Curriculum Based Assessment
  • Functional Behavioral Assessment
  • Data Collection and Analysis
  • Classwide Strategies and Assessment
  • Team Building

Gravois and Rosenfield and Gickling, IC Lab
10
Emphasis on Prevention
  • Primary - Schoolwide
  • Reduce new cases of problem behavior
  • Secondary - Targeted
  • Reduce current cases of problem behavior
  • Tertiary - Intensive
  • Reduce complications, intensity, severity




    of current cases

11
YELLOW Targeted vs RED Intensive Intervention
  • Targeted Intervention
    Intensive Intervention

School-wide strategies are insufficient to
facilitate success School-based plans -
invite school stakeholders and family
Assessment and intervention strategies begin
simple Intervention across school and home
School-wide and targeted strategies are
insufficient to facilitate success
System-based plans - involve all life domain
stakeholders right from the beginning
Assessment and intervention strategies build
upon past Intervention across life domains
12
Targeted Interventions are based on 3 behavioral
concepts
  • At-risk students benefit from a) clearly defined
    expectations, b) frequent feedback, c)
    consistency and d) positive reinforcement that is
    contingent on meeting goals.
  • Problem behavior and academic success are often
    linked.
  • Behavior support begins with the development of
    effective adult-student relationships.

(Crone, Horner, Hawken, 2004)
13
Targeted Interventions are
  • Designed for students who are at risk for
    developing serious or chronic problem behavior
  • Provide a system for monitoring student progress
  • Increase opportunity for positive reinforcement
    for following expectations
  • Can be accessed quickly

(Crone, Horner, Hawken, 2004)
14
Research on the BEP program
  • The BEP is likely to be effective with 60-75 of
    at-risk students
  • Students who do not find adult attention
    reinforcing are less likely to improve
  • If not successful, using FBA information to
    modify the BEP support can be effective

15
Targeted Intervention Process
  • Why Establish a Team?
  • To provide a building-based system that will
    ensure supports are provided to students for whom
    school-wide practices have not facilitated
    success.
  • To provide a structured problem-solving process
    that will ensure effective intervention practices
    are implemented for each student or issue
    brought to the team.

16
Defining Targeted Intervention
  • What is it For?
  • For those students who exhibit difficulties
    despite proactive school-wide prevention efforts
    students needing intervention.
  • Without school-wide prevention, we cannot
    reliably identify targeted-level students.
  • Likely to be students with both academic and
    behavioral difficulties.
  • Typically approximately 10 of school population.

17
Defining Targeted Interventions
  • When Should it Happen?
  • When school-wide data documents academic or
    behavioral problems that consistently distinguish
    a student from his or her peers.
  • When teacher reports indicate that a student is
    on the verge of failures, despite school-wide or
    classroom-wide strategies and procedures.
  • When existing interventions need revisions to
    increase effectiveness.

18
Targeted Intervention Process
  • How Does it Happen?
  • Through a commitment to supporting all students
    in a building, including those with problem
    behaviors.
  • Through a building-based intervention team
    representative of the faculty and support staff.
  • Through the use of an effective problem solving
    process - assessment.
  • Through the design of interventions that
    emphasize the creation of environments where
    this child can taste success and progress can
    be built from there.

19
Practical use of scarce resources
  • School-wide team
  • Efficient system of identification
  • If (a) small number of students, or (b) students
    with intense needs then use individual student
    supports (FBA/BSP or wraparound).
  • If many students (gt10) without intense needs then
    Targeted Group Intervention.
  • Technical competence needed
  • Functional assessment, support plan design
  • Information collection and use

20
Why do Targeted Group Interventions Work?
  • Improved structure through Team
  • Identifying Function of Behavior
  • Quick assessment of needs and motivation
  • Use of Data
  • Rapid access to interventions
  • Increased opportunities for recognition and
    reinforcement

21
(No Transcript)
22
Team TimeWhere are we now?
  • Delaware Implementation Self-Assessment (ISA)

23
Determine who will be on the Targeted Team
24
Targeted Intervention Process
  • Standing Members
  • Administrative personnel (principal, assistant
    principal, deans, etc)
  • Person with knowledge about instruction (strong
    regular education teacher may be rotating
    member)
  • Person with behavioral training (special
    education teacher or representative)
  • Clinical personnel (school psychologist, school
    social worker, counselor, nurse, local mental
    health rep)
  • Additional support staff (school resource
    officer, parent liaison etc.)

25
Does a problem solving team currently exist?
Does it need restructuring?
  • What current team(s) is/are in place?
  • How do our teams work together?
  • Who is on the team currently?
  • Who could be added/taken off the team?
  • How do kids come to the team?
  • Is there an efficient, predictable referral
    system?
  • What is the role or goal of the current team?
  • Does the team systematically develop and monitor
    interventions for each referred child?

26
Team Activity
  • Organizing our Teams

27
System for student selection for targeted
interventions
28
Targeted Intervention Process
  • How are students identified?
  • -Referrals come to the team through multiple
    avenues
  • PBS School-wide Team
  • Grade Level Problem Solving Teams
  • Teacher Assistance Teams
  • Classroom teachers - general and special
    education
  • Non-classroom staff
  • Parents
  • -Referrals are made to the team regarding
    academic, behavioral, social-emotional, or
    basic needs.

29
Data-Driven Dialogue Activity
  • Adapted from Organizing Data-Driven Dialogue by
    Laura Lipton Bruce Wellman, MiraVia LLC, 2001

30
Phase 1 - Prediction
  • What are your assumptions?
  • What are some predictions you would make?
  • What do you wonder?
  • What might you expect to see?

31
  • Go
  • Visual

32
Phase 2 Observations about School-wide Data
  • What important points seem to pop out?
  • What patterns or trends are emerging?
  • What seems to be surprising or unexpected?
  • What are some things we have not explored?
  • What questions do we have now?
  • How can we find out?

33
Phase 2 Observations about Grade and Classroom
Data
  • What important points seem to pop out?
  • What patterns or trends are emerging?
  • What seems to be surprising or unexpected?
  • What are some things we have not explored?
  • What questions do we have now?
  • How can we find out?

34
Phase 3 - Inference
  • What inferences and explanations can we draw?
  • What questions are we asking?
  • What additional data might we explore to verify
    our explanations?
  • What are some initial strategies we might try
    based on this data?

35
Define system for the referral/ interview process
36
Define system for referral/ interview process and
graduation
  • Develop referral form
  • Determine process for who will contact the
    referring teacher(s) for interview and select
    interview form
  • Process for interviewing the student
  • Criteria for graduation

37
Develop Referral Form
  • Options
  • Brief referral form and more comprehensive
    interview
  • Comprehensive referral form and brief interview

38
Selecting an Interview Form/Process
  • Existing tools for gathering information
  • Interviews
  • FA Interview
  • Student guided FA interview
  • Checklists
  • Problem Behavior Questionnaire
  • Records Review
  • Academic, behavioral, evaluations
  • Observation
  • ABC Assessment
  • Scatter Plots
  • The interview is the most powerful part of the
    process remember to find out the conditions for
    both problem behaviors and strengths

39
Team Activity
  • Referral Form

40
Now that you have referral information how do you
use it to determine what interventions to try?
41
Conjunction Junction Whats your Function?
42

Understanding Function
The most common problem behaviors in school
(and all behaviors) serve to either
  • 1. To Get Something (Obtain)
  • - attention, objects, power, self-stimulation
  • 2. To Get Away From Something (Escape)- tasks,
    embarrassment, situations, persons

Adapted from T. Scott, 1988
43
Examples of Function in Schools
(not necessarily conscious decisions by student)
  • Get/Access Reinforcers
  • I yell because others look at me.
  • I fight because others obey me.
  • I wander because people talk to me.
  • Get Away From/Escape/Avoid Aversives
  • I cry when work gets hard because someone will
    help me.
  • I throw a book during math class because the
    teacher will remove me from class.
  • I stand out of the way during PE because the
    other game participants will avoid throwing me
    the ball.

44
Functional Assessment of Behavior
  • Process of a Functional Behavioral Assessment can
    include
  • Interviews
  • Review of Incidents
  • Direct Observation

45
Functional Assessment Pathway
Maintaining Consequence THE FUNCTION Get
something Get away from Something
Problem Behavior
Setting Event
Triggering Event or Antecedent
46
Examples of Behavioral Pathways
  • When given math worksheets other assignments,
    Caesar does not do his work, he uses profanity
    disrupts lessons, especially, when he has worked
    alone for 30 minutes without peer contact. His
    work does not get completed, he avoids teachers
    requests.
  • Setting Event Trigger Behavior
    Consequence
  • Alone for Given Math Profanity
    Gets out of
  • 30 minutes or other task disruption
    completing work

47
For your team to use a function-based, problem
solving process
  • Identify interventions that serve the same
    function as the problem behaviors.
  • Plan for systematic teaching of skills as
    necessary.
  • Design environment to facilitate success by
    prompting/reinforcing expected behaviors.

48
Student Directed Problem Solving - 70/20/10
  • 70 work done by student
  • 20 work done by forms
  • 10 work done by helper
  • Stan Davis, www.stopbullyingnow.com

49
70/20/10
  • Reflection helping students develop empathy and
    find other ways to meet their needs (function).
  • Stan Davis, www.stopbullyingnow.com

50
70/20/10
  • 1. What did you do? Start with I.
  • 2. What was wrong with that?
  • 3. What's the consequence for this action?
  • 4. What problem were you trying to solve?
    What goals were you trying to reach?
  • 5. Next time you have that problem or goal how
    will you solve it?
  • Stan Davis, www.stopbullyingnow.com

51
FBA Forms
  • Behavior Pathways
  • Functional Assessment Interview Form
  • FACTS
  • Student Interview
  • Parent Interview
  • Parent Checklist

52
Team Activity Functional Assessment Interviews
  • Find someone who has a white paper if you
  • have a colored paper
  • White paper - interviewer/case manager
  • Colored paper teacher
  • Case manager interviews teacher and records
  • on white form

53
Targeted Group Interventions
54
Define targeted group intervention options
  • Identify existing interventions available
  • Develop new interventions to address needs of a
    group of targeted students
  • Discuss process for matching student to the
    intervention based on the referral and interview
    information
  • Identify a process for providing peer support to
    staff as needed

55
Activity Identify existing resources for
Targeted Students
  • Use the worksheet to think of resources already
    in place or accessible in your school
  • Social Workers
  • Family Crisis Therapist
  • School Psychologist
  • School Counselor
  • Other Counselor
  • School Nurse
  • Wellness Center Staff Mental health provider
  • Behavior Interventionists

56
Intervention Strategies
  • Preventive make the behavior irrelevant
  • Change the environment so its not necessary
  • Teaching make the behavior inefficient
  • Teach a replacement skill that works better
  • Function/Consequence make the behavior
    ineffective. Remove reinforcement of the problem
    behavior. Maximize reinforcement of the
    replacement behavior

57
Targeted Group Interventions
  • Group Based Programming Elements
  • Approximately 7 of the school population.
  • Small group interventions based on descriptive
    functional assessment information.
  • Intervention strategies include
  • Targeted social skills instruction (e.g., problem
    solving and conflict management),
  • Behavioral programming and contracting,
  • Self-management programming, and
  • Specifically structured opportunities for high
    rates of academic success.

58
Targeted Group Interventions
  • Group Based Programming Elements
  • Regular and frequent opportunities for positive
    reinforcement.
  • Home-school strengths-based connection/partnership
    .
  • Connection to school-wide expectations/rules.
  • Efficient, consistent data collection system.

59
Examples of Targeted Interventions
60
Daily Progress Report Example Name_________ Da
te_________
Goal ______ Score_______ Student Signature
____________________
61
Adult Supports
  • Workshops/Groups
  • Organizational Strategies
  • Social Skills
  • Anger Management
  • Focus Groups
  • General Supports
  • Check-in and Check-out
  • Homebase w/ teaching
  • Breakfast/Lunch Clubs
  • Mentoring
  • Think Tank in Classroom

62
Student Supports
  • Tutoring with peers
  • Mentoring program with older students
  • Targeted students becoming mentors to younger
    students
  • Student leadership opportunities

63
Targeted Intervention
Example Behavior Education Program
(BEP) (March Horner, 1998)
  • BEP Daily Cycle
  • Check in office at arrival to school
  • reminder binder
  • precorrections
  • turn in previous days signed form
  • pick-up new form
  • review daily goals

64
Behavior Education Program (BEP) (March
Horner, 1998)
  • BEP Daily Cycle
  • At each class
  • teacher completes card, or
  • student completes self-monitoring card/teacher
    checks and initials card
  • Check out at end of day
  • review days points goals
  • receive reinforcer if goal met
  • take successful card home
  • precorrections

65
Behavior Education Program (BEP) (March
Horner, 1998)
  • BEP Daily Cycle
  • Give successful day card to parent
  • receive reinforcer from parent
  • have parent sign card
  • Return signed card next day
  • Weekly BEP meeting with data graphing

66
Elements of the BEP
  • Organization/Structure
  • Identification/Referral
  • Contract
  • Basic BEP Cycle
  • Functional Assessment
  • Design of Support
  • Data Collection and Decision Making

67
Organization and Structure
  • BEP Coordinator
  • Chair BEP meetings, faculty contact, improvement
  • BEP Specialist
  • Check-in, check-out, meeting, data entry, graphs
  • Together (Coordinator Specialist) 10 hours/wk
  • BEP meeting 40 min per week
  • Coordinator, Specialist, Sped faculty, Related
    Services
  • All staff commitment and training
  • Simple data collection and reporting system.

68
Identification and Referral
  • Multiple office referrals
  • Recommendation by teacher
  • Recommendation by parent
  • Time to action
  • 30 min to 7 days

69
Contract
  • Agreement to succeed
  • Student
  • Parent
  • BEP coordinator
  • Teachers
  • Contract may be written or verbal
  • Better if written

70
Basic BEP Cycle
  • Morning check-in (Get BEP Form)
  • Give BEP form to each teacher prior to each
    period.
  • End of day check-out
  • Points tallied
  • Reward
  • BEP form copy taken home and signed.
  • Return signed copy next morning.

71
What each student experiences at start of their
school day
  • greeted (positive, personal, glad to see you)
  • scanned (ready to go to class?)
  • readiness check (books, pencils, etc?)
  • gets piece of paper(prompt for positive
    interaction)

72
Modifications for Escape-Motivated Behavior
  • Student can pick up Daily card from a designated
    box and return it there each day
  • Points earned can be used towards student
    selected reinforces
  • Select an adult the student is close with to the
    contact person
  • If function is to escape an academically
    challenging task then the student would require
    academic intervention as well

(Crone, Horner, Hawken, 2004)
73
BEP Cycle
74
Next Steps
  • Is the BEP system appropriate for you?
  • Are there more than 10 students with chronic
    patterns of problem behavior?
  • Is a school-wide system in place
  • Is there faculty commitment to work with tougher
    kids?
  • Are in-school resources available to implement?
  • Are district resources available to support
    start-up?
  • Build Action Plan
  • Review and present current data
  • Administration/Faculty commitment
  • Action steps within a doable timeline.

75
DelawarePositive Behavior SupportTargeted
TrainingJuly 31st and August 1st, 2006
  • Developed in part with material from Illinois
    PBIS Network

76
Team Resume
  • Team Activity Using each individual team
    members strengths, talents, abilities,
    experience, and interests develop a team resume.
  • Extra points are awarded for creativity and
    graphics.

77
DAY 2
  • What did we talk about yesterday?

78
Targeted Intervention
Example Behavior Education Program
(BEP) (March Horner, 1998)
  • BEP Daily Cycle
  • Check in office at arrival to school
  • reminder binder
  • precorrections
  • turn in previous days signed form
  • pick-up new form
  • review daily goals

79
Behavior Education Program (BEP) (March
Horner, 1998)
  • BEP Daily Cycle
  • At each class
  • teacher completes card, or
  • student completes self-monitoring card/teacher
    checks and initials card
  • Check out at end of day
  • review days points goals
  • receive reinforcer if goal met
  • take successful card home
  • precorrections

80
Behavior Education Program (BEP) (March
Horner, 1998)
  • BEP Daily Cycle
  • Give successful day card to parent
  • receive reinforcer from parent
  • have parent sign card
  • Return signed card next day
  • Weekly BEP meeting with data graphing

81
Elements of the BEP
  • Organization/Structure
  • Identification/Referral
  • Contract
  • Basic BEP Cycle
  • Functional Assessment
  • Design of Support
  • Data Collection and Decision Making

82
Organization and Structure
  • BEP Coordinator
  • Chair BEP meetings, faculty contact, improvement
  • BEP Specialist
  • Check-in, check-out, meeting, data entry, graphs
  • Together (Coordinator Specialist) 10 hours/wk
  • BEP meeting 40 min per week
  • Coordinator, Specialist, Sped faculty, Related
    Services
  • All staff commitment and training
  • Simple data collection and reporting system.

83
Identification and Referral
  • Multiple office referrals
  • Recommendation by teacher
  • Recommendation by parent
  • Time to action
  • 30 min to 7 days

84
Contract
  • Agreement to succeed
  • Student
  • Parent
  • BEP coordinator
  • Teachers
  • Contract may be written or verbal
  • Better if written

85
Basic BEP Cycle
  • Morning check-in (Get BEP Form)
  • Give BEP form to each teacher prior to each
    period.
  • End of day check-out
  • Points tallied
  • Reward
  • BEP form copy taken home and signed.
  • Return signed copy next morning.

86
What each student experiences at start of their
school day
  • greeted (positive, personal, glad to see you)
  • scanned (ready to go to class?)
  • readiness check (books, pencils, etc?)
  • gets piece of paper(prompt for positive
    interaction)

87
Modifications for Escape-Motivated Behavior
  • Student can pick up Daily card from a designated
    box and return it there each day
  • Points earned can be used towards student
    selected reinforces
  • Select an adult the student is close with to the
    contact person
  • If function is to escape an academically
    challenging task then the student would require
    academic intervention as well

(Crone, Horner, Hawken, 2004)
88
BEP Cycle
89
Next Steps
  • Is the BEP system appropriate for you?
  • Are there more than 10 students with chronic
    patterns of problem behavior?
  • Is a school-wide system in place
  • Is there faculty commitment to work with tougher
    kids?
  • Are in-school resources available to implement?
  • Are district resources available to support
    start-up?
  • Build Action Plan
  • Review and present current data
  • Administration/Faculty commitment
  • Action steps within a doable timeline.

90
Share
  • Other Targeted Strategies
  • IST/Targeted Match

91
Just in Time
92
Additional Data Sources
  • Nutritional data
  • Nurses data
  • Attendance
  • DSTP scores
  • Grades
  • Number of SW reinforcers earned
  • Anything else identified as being useful for
    planning for a particular student

93
Team Activity
  • Developing Targeted Interventions using Function

94
Team Meeting Process
95
Define individual team process
  • Standing team members / Process to invite others
    as needed
  • Meeting procedures
  • How often to meet?
  • Who facilitates?
  • Other meeting roles?
  • When to review individual student data who
    brings it to the team?

96
Targeted Intervention Process
  • When does the Team meet?
  • -Team Meetings
  • Regularly scheduled meetings - weekly or
    bi-weekly depending on building needs.
  • If no new referrals, the team meets briefly to
    review progress on current interventions, to
    self-evaluate, and to action plan.

97
Problem-Identification and Analysis
  • Create a shared understanding of the concern
  • Define concerns in specific, observable terms
  • Define concerns in specific, observable and
    DESIRED terms
  • Conduct Instructional Assessment to ensure a
    MATCH
  • Discuss possible relationships between concerns
  • Decide if more behavioral information is needed,
    if yes, conduct Functional Behavioral Assessment
  • Prioritize
  • Baseline
  • Goals

Instructional Consultative Lab, U Md. Gravois,
Rosenfield, Gickling
98
Meeting Roles
  • Facilitator guides the meeting process
    remains objective 
  • Time Keeper keeps track of time spent on issue
    prompts group when time allotted for an item is
    up helps to ensure equal floor time for
    everyone
  • Scribe/Decision Taker- takes notes, and just keep
    track of decisions made-minutes can be a record
    of topics and decisions made as opposed to trying
    to keep track of what everyone says 
  • Doorkeeper sits near door and fills in late
    comers with current status of meeting and what
    they missed
  • Temperature Taker monitors how group is
    responding to each other- process and reflect the
    group dynamics

99
Communication Skills
  • Active Listening
  • Paraphrasing
  • Perception Checking
  • Asking Clarifying Questions
  • Summarizing
  • Asking Relevant Questions
  • Offering Information
  • Adapted from
    Instructional Consultative Lab

100
Team Meeting Activity
  • Role play targeted team meeting
  • Case manager present a student using information
    from interview and case study handout
  • Use your school-wide data, and student data to
    problem solve
  • Select intervention strategies
  • How can you intervene with the environment?
  • How can you intervene with the student?

101
Additional Classroom Information
  • Class 1B This is this teachers first year of
    teaching.
  • Class 5C The teacher of this class has been on
    extended medical leave for the majority of the
    school year, and has been replaced in the interim
    by several different long-term substitute
    teachers. The various substitutes have different
    teaching styles and expectations of the class.
  • Class 8A This teacher chose not to participate
    in the school-wide PBS program this year. She
    feels that the 8th grade students should know how
    to behave at this point in their educational
    experience, and that they do not need to be
    rewarded for doing things that they are already
    supposed to be doing.

102
DSTP Scores
  • Gr. 1 Keisha
  • No scores available
  • Gr. 5 Deonte
  • 4th Rdg Below Math Meets Writing Below
  • 3rd Rdg Meets Math Meets Writing Below
  • 2nd Rdg Below Math Meets Writing Below
  • Gr. 8 Jerry
  • 7th Rdg Below Math Below Writing Below
  • 7th Rdg Meets Math Meets Writing Below
  • 6th Rdg Meets Math Below Writing Below
  • 5th Rdg Meets Math Meets Writing Meets

103
Data for Decision-making
104
Develop and use data systems for decision-making
  • Existing behavior data
  • Develop, as needed, additional data tracking
    tools and determine who is responsible for
    keeping the data

105
Daily Progress Report
106
Daily Data Used for Decision Making
107
Daily Data Used for Decision Making
108
Importance of Functional Assessment in BEP
109
Sample Point Card Data
110
Data Collection for Decision-Making
  • Monitor BEP points earned each day
  • Office Discipline Referrals
  • Regular use of data by BEP team
  • Outcome Data

111
Determine criteria for graduation from program
  • Average daily point criteria over time
  • Sampling of data points
  • Reduction in number of referrals
  • Completion of program (anger management, skills
    workshops, etc.)
  • Reach level of Self-monitoring

112
One of Four Decisions
  • Student is ready to be phased out of targeted
    intervention
  • Things are going fine, but student needs to stay
    in program
  • Student is having some problems, what simple
    additions can be made (Who is responsible?
    Timeline?)
  • Student is having bigger problems, refer for full
    FBA/BSP (Who is responsible? Timeline?)

(Crone, Horner, Hawken, 2004)
113
Self-monitoring
  • Use the same or similar card for self-monitoring
  • Start with teacher and student both rating the
    behavior simultaneously
  • Compare ratings at the end of the class
  • Student can earn small reinforcer for rating the
    same as the teacher
  • Return to reinforcing the appropriate behavior
    once students self rating is reliable

114
Self-monitoring
  • Fade teacher rating
  • Continue data collection during the
    self-monitoring process
  • Make sure the discussion with the student about
    self-monitoring is positive and emphasizes
    accomplishments, not removal of support
  • If the student wants to continue, then stop the
    data collection, but the student can continue to
    check in and self-monitor

115
Student Data Plans
  • What data do we currently have?
  • What data do we need?
  • How are we going to involve students in the
    process? (interviews, data collection,
    self-monitoring, goal setting, etc.)

116
Sharing Information with Staff
117
Provide information to all staff regarding
procedures and outcomes
  • Inform staff about how to refer students and
    interview processes
  • Staffs role in providing feedback regarding
    targeted student behavior
  • Provide regular updates to School-wide PBS team
    and the whole staff

118
Staff Updates and PBS Team Updates
  • PBS Team Updates
  • Share data back and forth regarding the students
    in the Yellow Zone
  • Keep communication open between teams dual
    members is great, but consider a standing agenda
    item to prompt quick updates/questions/
  • discussions
  • Staff Updates
  • Keep everyone up to date about the work of the
    Targeted Team
  • Share general data and progress with staff
  • Gives opportunity for questions or discussion

119
Staff Update Example
  • Current enrollment in Targeted Interventions 23
  • Number of students that graduated this month 7!
  • Staff must fill out a referral form to begin a
    student in the targeted process. See Mrs. Klein
    if you have any questions about the form.
  • Thanks to the following staff who have been
    active with the Hug program so far this year.
    To join us see Ms. Siegel. Wed love to have
    you!
  • Check out our current data. If you have data
    questions please see Mr. Rozumalski.

120
Behavioral Referral Data
121
Weekly Progress on Individual Goals
122
Information Sharing with all staff
  • Team Activity
  • Create a one minute commercial to announce
    Targeted Team concept to the staff. Creativity is
    encouraged!

123
Team Activity
  • Targeted Team Implementation Checklist and
  • Action Planning

124
Evaluation and Reflection Time
www.delawarepbs.org
About PowerShow.com