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National Trend in Education For a Sustainable Future EFS

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Title: National Trend in Education For a Sustainable Future EFS


1
National Trend in Education For a Sustainable
Future (EFS)
  • By Debra Rowe, Ph.D.
  • Senior Fellow
  • Association of University Leaders for a
    Sustainable Future
  • Higher Education Co-chair
  • U.S. Partnership for Education for Sustainable
    Development
  • dgrowe_at_oaklandcc.edu
  • (Thanks to Anthony Cortese at Second Nature for
    some of the slides)

2
  • Part I EFS Why and What?
  • Part II Accomplishments
  • Part III National Trends and Resources
  • Part IV Next Steps

3
Sustainable Development is often defined as
  • meeting the needs of the present
  • without compromising the ability of
  • future generations to
  • meet their own needs
  • Brundtland Commission (1987).
  • Our Common Future. England Oxford University
    Press.
  •  

4
What is Sustainability? Sustainability is
achieved when all people on Earth can live well
without compromising the quality of life for
future generations.
  • Rolf Jucker, 2003. UNESCOs Teaching and
    Learning for a Sustainable Future A critical
    Evaluation in the Trumpeter Volume 19 Number 2

5
The components ofA Sustainable Future The
Triple Bottom Line
6
 
What is Sustainable Development? While
sustainable development may require different
actions in every region of the world, the efforts
to build a truly sustainable way of life require
the integration of action in three key
areas From World Summit on Sustainable
Development brochure, 2002

7
What is sustainable development?
  • 1. Conserving Natural Resources and the
    Environment  
  • for future generations, reduce resource
    consumption, stop pollution and conserve natural
    habitats.

8
What is sustainable development?
  • 2. Economic Growth and Equity
  • foster responsible long-term growth while
    ensuring that no nation or community is left
    behind.

9
What is sustainable development?
  • 3. Social Development
  • Throughout the world, people need jobs, food,
    education, energy, health care, water and
    sanitation also ensure that cultural and social
    diversity, and the rights of workers are
    respected, and that all members of society play a
    role in determining their futures.

10
The United Nations has declared a Decade of
Education for Sustainable Development2005-2014
11
Key Action Themes
  • Overcoming Poverty 
  • Gender Equality 
  • Health Promotion 
  • Environment 
  • Rural Development 
  • Cultural Diversity 
  • Peace Human Security 
  • Sustainable Urbanization

12
A National Trend in Business The Triple Bottom
Line
  • Employers want sustainability literate and
    engaged graduates
  • Business schools increasingly infusing
    sustainability into their curricula
    (www.beyondgreypinstripes.org )
  • World Business Council for Sustainable
    Development (www.wbcsd.org )

13
Education for a Sustainable Society enables
people to develop the knowledge, values and
skills to participate in decisions , that will
improve the quality of life now without damaging
the planet for the future. 
14
Ecosystem
Ecosystem
Sustainable Communities
Public Choices and Behaviors-Laws
Applied Knowledge/ Technological Skills
Private Choices and Behaviors-Habits
Sustainable Economies
Ecosystem
Ecosystem
15
Why Sustainability Now?
  • We are the first generation capable of
    determining the habitability of the planet for
    humans and other species.  

16
Why Sustainability Why Now?
  • Human presence on a global scale
  • All living systems in long term decline at
    unprecedented and accelerating rate
  • Unprecedented growth in population and
    consumption
  • Gap between rich and poor accelerating
  • Global Warming/Climate Change

17
Global Perspective
life supporting resources declining
consumption of life supporting resources rising
18
Why is ESD such a high priority in the U.S.?
  • Much of the U.S. public doesnt know that we are
    exceeding the carrying capacity of the planet.
    (www.myfootprint.org)
  • All of the life supporting ecosystems are
    degrading (http//www.worldwatch.org/topics/nature
    )
  • The U.S. has approximately 5 of the worlds
    population and is consuming 25 of the worlds
    resources. (Jucker, Our Common Illiteracy
    Education as If the Earth and People Mattered,
    Peter Lang Publishers)
  • Public doesnt know we can reduce human
    suffering, environmental degradation and social
    injustice now while building stronger economies
  • A rapid shift in mindset is needed and education
    is the key.

19
Global Transition
  • From
  • Fossil powered
  • Take, make, waste
  • Living off natures capital
  • Market as master
  • Loss of cultural biological diversity
  • Materialism as goal
  • To
  • Sustainable Energies
  • Cyclical production
  • Living off natures income
  • Market as servant
  • Increased cultural biological diversity
  • Human satisfaction goal

20
Dominant Human Beliefs
  • Humans dominant species separate from environment
  • Resources free and inexhaustible
  • Technology the answer
  • Earth can assimilate all wastes
  • All human needs can be met by human means
  • Individual success independent of health of
    communities, cultures and ecosystems

21
Why is efs so important?
  •  
  • Higher education institutions bear a profound
    moral and social responsibility/opportunity to
    increase the awareness, knowledge, skills and
    values needed to create
  • a more just and sustainable society.  

22
Potential is enormous
  • 4,096 U.S. Colleges and Universities (1)
  • 14.8 million students (1)
  • 277 billion annual expenditures 2.8 of the
    GDP(1)
  • HE expenditures gt the GDP of all but 25 countries
    in the world(2)
  • 1 From 2001 Digest of Education Statistics,
    US Dept. of Education.
  • From 2001 CIA World Factbook and Dowling, Mike.,
    "Interactive Table of World Nations," available
    from http//www.mrdowling.com/800nations.html
    Internet updated Friday, June 29, 2001

23
Questions
  • 1. What is the content, context and process of
    education that will result in all students having
    knowledge, skills and values to lead society down
    a more sustainable path?
  • 2. How can higher education model sustainability
    in all its operations and practices and connect
    it to student learning, student life and student
    behavior?

24
Part II
  • Accomplishments within higher education -
    Education for a Sustainable Future (ESF)

25
For education, Sustainable Development integrated
into
Curricula
Research
Mission and Planning
Operations
Purchasing
CommunityOutreach and Partnerships
Professional Development
Student Life
26
The campus as a living lab for sustainability
practices and skill building.
  • A community of learners. A community of global
    citizens. A community of change agents.

27
Academics, Student Life, Facilities and
Purchasing Sustainability as the Campus
Context Providing the models and opportunities
for practicing the changing of behaviorsBuilding
values, behaviors, and identities
28
Key places to institutionalize EFS
  • OrientationCurricula Review First Year
    Experience Student Life
  • Gen Ed Core
  • Workforce Development
  • Sustainable Living Campaigns

29
Making sustainability an integral part of
planning, operations, facility design,
purchasing, investments, and student life, and
tie all of these efforts to the formal
curriculum.
30
HE Sustainability Examples
  • Systemic integration
  • Lane Community College
  • University of Florida
  • Georgia Tech
  • Transportation
  • UC Boulder
  • Cornell
  • Energy Climate Change
  • Maui Comm. College
  • Wisconsin Technical Colleges
  • SUNY Buffalo
  • University of California System
  • Western Washington University
  • Pennsylvania - Wind

31
HE Sustainability Examples
  • Food
  • University of Montana
  • Yale
  • Green Building
  • Los Angeles Comm. College District
  • University of Washington
  • South Carolina universities
  • University of North Carolina

32
Example of Student Led Projects
  • Sustainability audits
  • Sustainable purchasing
  • Greenhouse gas reductions (www.energyaction.net
    and www.hecap.org)
  • Film and speaker series and futures fairs
  • Green building designs and sustainable living
    campaigns
  • Info on sustainability in career office,
    orientation, first year experience
  • Many more possibilities in all disciplines
    project website!

33
Part III
  • National Trend and Resources

34
For education, Sustainable Development integrated
into
Curricula
Research
Mission and Planning
Operations
Purchasing
CommunityOutreach and Partnerships
Professional Development
Student Life
35
GREAT NEWS!!!Growing National TrendOver
seventeen national HE associations have
initiatives on Education for Sustainable
Development
36
Engaged National Associations
  • ACEAm. Council on Ed.Presidency Mag.
  • AACU Ass. of American Colleges and Universities
  • AACC Am. Ass. of Community Colleges
  • AASCU State Colleges and Universities
  • ACUI Student Unions
  • NACAS Aux. Officers
  • NAEB Educational Buyers
  • 8. APPA Facilities
  • 9. NACUBO Business
  • 10. SCUP College and University Planners
  • 11. ACUHO Housing
  • 12. ACPA Student Life
  • 13. NACUFS Food
  • 14. ACEED-I Events and Conference Directors
  • 15. NACS Campus Stores
  • AND MORE

37
HEASC - Higher Education Associations
Sustainability Consortium
38
HEASC members
ACUI student life AASCU state colleges and
universities APPA - facilities directors SCUP -
planners NACUBO - business officers NAEB -
buyers AASHE - sustainability leaders ACPA -
freshman experience, orientation, summer reading
39
Accomplishments
  • 1. Feature articles
  • 2. EFS at conferences
  • 3. Web pages for EFS, including stories,
    templates, resources and more
  • 4. Higher Education Climate Action Partnership
    (www.hecap.org) to reduce climate change
  • 5. Professional development offerings

40
More Exciting News!!
Association for the Advancement of
Sustainability in Higher Education AASHE (A
Y-shee) www.aashe.org
41
AASHEs Mission
  • Catalyze sustainability in all sectors of higher
    ed - from governance and operations to curriculum
    and research
  • Vision campuses modeling sustainability in all
    learning, operations, and outreach

42
AASHE Resources
  • Case Studies of curricula, planning,
    operations
  • Tools (e.g.sustainability assessments/indicators
    ,
  • greenhouse gas calculators)
  • Conferences and professional development
  • Web resources syllabi, institutional profiles
  • Listservs (for faculty, business officers,
    purchasing agents,
    facilities managers, students)
  • Inform local, state national policy
  • Encourage facilitate collaboration
  • Awards and recognition

43
More National Organizations to assist you
  • Association of University Leaders for a
    Sustainable Future www.ulsf.org Tailloires
    Declaration
  • Second Nature www.secondnature.org
  • Fellowships through National Wildlife
    Federations Campus Ecology
  • Grey Pinstripes for business schools through the
    World Resources Institute

44
National Discipline Associations
  • May 2006
  • AACU, AASHE, ULSF
  • Political Science, Philosophy, Religion,
    Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, Biology,
    Engineering, Chemistry, Economics, Mass
    Communication and Journalism, Geography
  • American Association for the Advancement of
    Science (AAAS), National Academies of Science
  • Next step - journal editors (2007)

45
U.S. Partnership for the Decade of Education for
Sustainable Development
  • Non-partisan
  • Multiple Sector Teams Business, Higher Ed.,
    Youth, Faith
  • Convene, Catalyze, Communicate
  • www.uspartnership.org

46
www.uspartnership.orgJoin for free Participate
in a sector or action team
47
Helpful simulation tool
  • We Can Afford to Solve the Worlds Problems -
    TheWorld Game Institute - 18 strategies for
    confronting the major systemic problems
    confronting humanity
  • http//www.unesco.org/education/tlsf/theme_a/mod02
    /www.worldgame.org/wwwproject/index.shtml

48
StudentsBeyond Armchair pontification!
  • Provide academic and student life opportunities
    to build CHANGE AGENT identities, skills and
    behaviors
  • Campus Ecology
  • www.nwf.org/campusecology/
  • U.S. Fair Trade 
  • www.transfairusa.org
  • Climate Challenge Campaign - http//www.energyacti
    on.net and www.hecap.org
  • Global Exchangewww.globalexchange.org

49
  • Help students understand the consequences of
    their choices as consumers and investors
  • The Natural Step - www.naturalstep.org
  • Smart Consumers Website - http//ibuydifferent.or
  • Consumer and Investor Power for Social Change -
    http//www.coopamerica.org/
  • Ecological Footprint Calculator -
    http//www.rprogress.org  
  • Center for a New American Dream
  • http//www.newdream.org/

50
Utilize outside stakeholders and powerful cross
sector collaboration
  • STUDENTS AND..
  • Businesses
  • City and county government
  • Non-profit organizations
  • Alumni

51
KEY THRUST
  • Change norms so all students become
  • environmentally responsible
  • socially responsible
  • active citizens in a global economy

52
Part V
  • Next Steps

53
Key strategies to build the perceived critical
mass
  • Framing Bring together college constituencies
    to create a critical mass.
  • Possible allies people focusing on
  • diversity, global learning, international ed,
    service learning, economic development,
    facilities, student life groups, social and
    natural science faculty, and environmental
    expertise

54
Key EFS Strategies
  • Making invisible impacts visible
  • Practicing sustainability on campus and in
    external communities connected to student
    learning

55
  • What are your next steps in making
    education for and practice of sustainability a
    major goal of your institution?

56
Possibilities for Next Steps
  • Explicitly recognize and include ESD in the next
    round of mission definition and strategic
    planning (e.g. Lane CC)
  • Encourage your strategic planners, purchasing
    agent, facilities director, student life
    coordinators, faculty and students to join the
    national online learning communities dedicated to
    education for sustainable development. (go to
    www.aashe.org and click on Email lists)
  • Include sustainable development core competencies
    in the next revision of General Education outcome
    requirements (examples at www.ncseonline.org/EFS/D
    ebraRowe.pdf )

57
Possibilities for Next Steps
  • 4. Commit to
  • a. Build and renovate facilities using socially
    and environmentally responsible practices (e.g.
    LEED building at Los Angeles CC)
  • b. Purchase socially and environmentally
    responsible products (e.g. no sweatshop products
    in the bookstore) (e.g. national initiative from
    NACS)
  • c. Infuse sustainability throughout the
    disciplines via staff development offerings and
    faculty engagement strategies (e.g. Broward CC,
    Emory)
  • d. Develop college-community partnerships for
    sustainable development and using those
    partnerships for service learning opportunities
    for students (e.g. Grand Rapids, Grand Valley
    State)

58
Possibilities for Next Steps
  • 4. Commit to
  • e. Engage in the Campus Climate Challenge to
    reduce greenhouse gas emissions
    (www.energyaction.net )
  • f. Help to create economic policies that support
    stronger economies via the building of healthier
    ecosystems and social systems (e.g.
    http//www.paconsortium.state.pa.us/ )
  • Utilize the media to publicize the positive steps
    your institution takes to both teach and model
    sustainable development.

59
In summary, commit to the triple bottom line of
economically, socially and environmentally
responsible principles in all of the colleges
decision-making. Infuse into
Curricula
Research
Mission and Planning
Operations
Purchasing
CommunityOutreach and Partnerships
Professional Development
Student Life
60
Emphasize the benefits - Embracing esd can
  • Improved teaching and learning
  • Students prepared for citizenship and career
  • Attraction of students, faculty and funding
  • Save and other resources for the institution
    and society
  • Improve the institutions reputation
  • Cooperation and satisfaction across institution
  • Help improve town/gown relationships
  • Fulfill moral and social responsibility
  • Improve strategic positioning

61
Conclusions
  • The U.S. public is not educated enough about
    sustainability issues and solutions.
  • We need sustainability literacy and engagement
    for ALL.
  • There is a national trend in ESF with too many
    developments to report, but much more needs to be
    done.
  • There are many resources and strategies to help
    you infuse sustainability into your institution.
    We can assist you.
  • Document all you do and share through the U.S.
    Partnership AASHE

62
Let our enthusiasm show!For more information,
contact Debra Rowe at dgrowe_at_oaklandcc.edu
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