Improving Achievement and Closing Gaps Between Groups: Data Resources and Hints - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Improving Achievement and Closing Gaps Between Groups: Data Resources and Hints PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 6bb83-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Improving Achievement and Closing Gaps Between Groups: Data Resources and Hints

Description:

School and district assessment data; Classroom 'value-added' analyses ... Time, Staffing and Professional Development. New ... Lexington Herald Leader ' ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:70
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 98
Provided by: staf48
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Improving Achievement and Closing Gaps Between Groups: Data Resources and Hints


1
Improving Achievement and Closing Gaps Between
Groups Data Resources and Hints
2
Eight Categories (for today, anyway)
  • School and district assessment data
  • Classroom value-added analyses
  • Teacher and Student Work
  • Student Views
  • Whos Teaching Whom?

3
  • Time for Instruction
  • Time, Staffing and Professional Development
  • New Web-Based Resources

4
And before were done, a few words about NCLB
5
1. Assessment
  • SOURCES
  • State Depts of Education
  • Greatschools.net
  • Just 4 the Kids

6
  • What do the school and district data tell us
    about who is achieving and who isnt?
  • And about who is improving and who isnt?
  • If you were superintendent/principal, how would
    you summarize these results to your staff or
    community?

7
  • What more can test data tell you?
  • Will item analyses help? If so, where do you get
    them?

8
2. Classroom Value-Added Analyses
9
How This Research Got Started
10
Boston Students With Effective Teachers Showed
Greater Gains In Reading and Math
Average Student Growth Over One Year
Math
Reading
Source Boston Public Schools, High School
Restructuring, March 9, 1998.
11
Effects On Students Math Scores In Dallas (Grades
3-5)
Beginning 3rd Grade
Change in Average Score on Math Assessment Over 3
years
Source Heather Jordan, Robert Mendro, Dash
Weerasinghe, " Teacher Effects On Longitudinal
Student Achievement" 1997.
12
Teacher A
13
Teacher B
14
Teacher C
15
In High Schools, Can Also Generate Predicted
vs. Actual Performance, by Classroom
  • See Tennesee

16
Another Option 9-week Assessments
  • Lancaster, PA

17
Value-Added Resources
  • William Sanders, SAS in the Schools
  • Ysleta and Dallas, TX districts

18
3.Teacher and Student Work
  • grades/score analyses
  • Standards in Practice
  • Calibration

19
A Students in High Poverty Schools Score at
About the Same Level as C and D Students in
Affluent Schools
Source US Department of Education, Office of
Educational Research and Improvement. What Do
Student Grades Mean? Difference Across Schools.
Educational Research Report (p. 3) January 1995.
20
Source Accountability Targets Summary, San
Diego, Spring, 1998 2000 by The Education Trust,
Inc.
21
Standards in Practice A Quality
Control/Instructional Improvement Tool
  • Developed in El Paso, Pueblo, Philly
  • now in broad use
  • teams of teachers, 2 hours a week
  • is work meeting standards?

22
Grade 10 Writing Assignment
A frequent theme in literature is the conflict
between the individual and society. From
literature you have read, select a character who
struggled with society. In a well-developed
essay, identify the character and explain why
this characters conflict with society is
important.
23
Grade 10 Writing Assignment
Write a composition of at least 4 paragraphs on
Martin Luther Kings most important contribution
to this society. Illustrate your work with a
neat cover page. Neatness counts.
24
Calibration Are Assignments at Standard?
  • 2 week method
  • crate method

25
Useful Resource DataWorks
26
14 SC Schools Calibrated
27
4. Student Views
  • Surveys
  • Focus Groups
  • Shadowing
  • Writing/Drama
  • Data Analysis

28
What Teenagers Say About School Rigor
  • Fewer Than 3 in 10 Think Their School is Very
    Academically Rigorous

Source 1998 Annual Survey from Whos Who Among
American High School Students 2000 by The
Education Trust, Inc.
29
Focus Groups eg. San Jose Unified
30
Shadowing (make sure ALL types of students)
31
Writing, Drama, Oral Presentations
  • Note Bring your graduates BACK to talk with
    their teachers

32
Or How About a Little Real-World Application of
Mathematics Skills?
33
At Luke Moore, There are 17 Times More Sections
of Job Training
Than There are of Math
40
30
20
Number of Sections
10
0
Math
Job Training
Source Luke Moore Master Schedule 2000-2001
2001 Calculations by YOUTHink
34
At Luke Moore, There are 12 Times as Many
Students Enrolled
in Job Training as in Algebra, Geometry, Algebra
II, Pre-Calculus and
Calculus Combined
120
100
80
percent of
60
Percent of Students
students
enrolled
40
20
0
Math
Job Training
Source Luke Moore Master Schedule 2000-2001
Calculations by YOUTHink, 2001
35
(No Transcript)
36
(No Transcript)
37
(No Transcript)
38
(No Transcript)
39
(No Transcript)
40
(No Transcript)
41
(No Transcript)
42
By the way, its not just students who ought to
be looking at whos in what courses...
43
High-performing minority students often excluded
from higher-rigor courses
Source The Achievement Council and the Education
Trust West analysis of unpublished CA district
data, 2001.
44
5. Whos Teaching Whom?
  • collect data on teacher and student
    characteristics--what are the patterns?
  • Analyzing master schedules--time AND talent

45
Classes in High Poverty High Schools More Often
Taught by Underqualified Teachers
Teachers who lack a major or minor in the
field Source National Commission on Teaching and
Americas Future, What Matters Most Teaching for
Americas Future (p.16) 1996.
46
Math and Science Classes of Mostly Minority
Students Are More Often Taught by Underqualified
Teachers
Source Jeannie Oakes. Multiplying Inequalities
The Effects of Race, Social Class, and Tracking
on Opportunities to Learn Mathematics and
Science (Rand 1990)
47
Analyzing Master Schedules
  • the most experienced and best educated teachers
    who are they teaching
  • student loads AP vs. Remedial courses

48
Regular Team Sample
49
Pre-IB Team Sample
50
Vocational Teacher Sample
51
11-12 IB/AP Teacher Sample
52
6. What About the Matter of Time for
Instruction?
53
Most of us think of semester- or year-long
increments to teach kids what they need to learn,
but...
54
Analysis of of School Calendars Tells a
Different Story About Available Time
55
The Full Year Calendar
56
Less Summer Vacation
57
Less Weekends, Holidays, Summer Vacation
58
Less Professional Development Days Early
Dismissal/Parent Conferences
59
Less Class Picnic, Class Trip, Thanksgiving
Feast, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Hannukkah, Awards,
Assembles, Concerts
60
Less State and District Testing
61
Bottom Line
  • Roughly 13-15 Eight-Hour Days Per Subject Per
    Year

62
Kids Who are Behind Need Extra Instruction
63
PSSA - Reading Performance Level, Lincoln Middle
School, Lancaster, PA
64
7. What About Staffing and Time for
Professional Development?
65
Staffing Decisions and Class Size Impacts Core
Subject Teachers Only
66
Staffing Decisions and Class Size
Impacts Including SPED Specialists
67
Staffing Decisions and Class Size
Impacts Including Title I and ELL Specialists
68
Staffing Decisions and Class Size
Impacts Including Enrichment Teachers
69
Staffing Decisions and Class Size
Impacts Including Other Certified FTEs
70
Staffing Decisions and Class Size Impacts Optimal
71
Reynolds Middle School More Effective Use of
Time Means Increased Instructional Opportunities
72
8. Some New Web-Based Data Resources for YOU!
73
(No Transcript)
74
(No Transcript)
75
(No Transcript)
76
New Dispelling the Myth Online
77
Dispelling the Myth
78
Dispelling the Myth
79
Dispelling the Myth
80
(No Transcript)
81
FINALLY, A FEW WORDS ABOUT HOW WE TALK ABOUT
GAP-CLOSING AND NCLB
82
Statement of Purpose
Closing the achievement gap between high- and
low-performing children, especially the
achievement gaps between minority and nonminority
students, and between disadvantaged children and
their more advantaged peers. 20 U.S.C. 6301
83
Some leaders are talking about the challenges in
the new law one way……
84
The federal government has put us in a bind . .
. Were never going to be able to meet the 100
mark. -Kerry Mazzoni, Californias secretary of
education Los Angeles Times September 25, 2002
85
  • Requiring every group of students in every
    school to be proficient within 12 years, is like
    asking every kid to jump the Grand Canyon.
  • educator, Connecticut
  • June 10, 2002
  • Associated Press

86
"It is so inflexible. If any group of kids fails
to meet the standard, the whole school is labeled
as failing. suburban superintendent (used to
doing extremely well under old system of
averages)
87
These are what statisticians call
outliersunexplained exceptions in any field
that do not provide models that can be
successfully emulated. Michael Jordan, for
example, is an outlier that he can play at such
a level does not mean that any basketball player
with good training can do so. -Richard
Rothstein The New York Times April 10, 2002
88
  • "I have difficulty with the standards because
    they're so unattainable for so many of our
    students . . . We just don't have the same kids
    they have on Long Island or Orchard Park.
  • Superintendent, New York October 21, 2002, The
    Buffalo News

89
They may as well have decreed that pigs can fly
. . . I think the State Board of Education is
dealing with reality, not myth. Some of these
politicians just have their heads in the
sand. -Wayne Johnson, CTA President Los Angeles
Times August 6, 2002
90
Think about the messages in what they say…
  • To parents…about whose kids matter
  • To students…about how much educators think they
    can learn and,
  • To teachers…about whether they even have to try.

91
Other leaders are talking about the challenge in
very different ways….
92
  • "We know the bar will always be raised. I call it
    a forklift, not a cart, because it's going
    forward and going up. But we are here to educate
    children, and we should have our standards
    raised."
  • Martha Stone, assistant superintendent of
    curriculum and instruction, Irving School
    District, TX

93
"Neither poverty nor race is an excuse. All
children can rise to the standards and there are
many schools in the data that you have to prove
it. Rick Mills, Commissioner of Education,
New York. March 28, 2002, New York Times
94
With proper instruction, students here can blow
other kids away in the humanities. The more you
challenge them, the better they'll do.
Dolores Edwards Sullivan, an English teacher
in the predominantly African American Roosevelt
school district, whose 11th graders are starting
to earn higher marks on state Regents exams.
95
Yes, parents may have the greatest impact on how
their children come to us. But we have the
greatest impact on how they leave
us. Superintendent, North Carolina
96
  • "If you love children, you can't say this law is
    a waste. . . It has to come down to someone
    making sure these kids are getting an education.
  • Denise Allen, Kentucky
  • November 13, 2002, Lexington Herald Leader

97
"At the end of the day, we are responsible for
every child. Will we do it? Certainly. Will we
look good early on? I doubt it." Superintendent
, Wake County June 2, 2002 News and Observer (NC)
98
Yes, this is going to be hard. But how we
communicate will play a large role in whether
people will even try.
99
The Education Trust
  • For More Information . . .
  • www.edtrust.org
  • DC 202-293-1217
  • Oakland 510-465-6444
About PowerShow.com